Tag Archives: travel

Would You Pay Extra For A “Child-Free” Flight?

I’ve said it a million times, but I’ll say it again: I love kids. But being stuck on a six-hour flight with a squalling toddler right behind me, killing my enjoyment of my millionth bag of peanuts and whatever crap movie is on, totally sucks. But is a screaming infant so annoying that I might pay extra for a seat on a child-free flight? Apparently, I might have the option, as some fliers are calling upon airlines to offer kid-free flights — or “family only” sections — so that their travel experience can be temper tantrum-free. Keep reading »

Dear Wendy: “Can A Vacation Fling Turn Into The Real Thing?”

A couple of months ago I went on a foreign vacation and met a great guy. For a few days we connected, laughed, talked, and had great sex. I left him with a hug and “it was wonderful,” and thought that would be it. I wasn’t going to let myself fall into any “How Stella Got Her Groove Back” unrealistic romance. But once I got home, everything seemed dull without him. The life we’d jokingly talked about having together sounded good. We started emailing a little. Without saying anything about it, I’ve started learning his language and saving money to go back. But I’ve found myself afraid to say anything very serious to my friend … I don’t know what he’s thinking we are. The email flirting is fun, but I don’t know how to bring up the subject of anything more serious without sounding like I’m chasing him or prying (I don’t even know whether he’s started seeing someone else). After all, I was the one who made it clear nothing serious was happening when I left. What do you think I should do? Or am I totally crazy for trying to make a vacation romance into a real one? — In Love, Maybe

Keep reading »

A Carryall That Promotes Peace And Harmony

The holidays are fast-approaching, and that means it’s time for you to get out of town. The Sak Artist Circle Convertible Weekender will hold enough clothes and toiletries for a quick getaway, and the soothing prints, created by artists who share the Sak’s philosophy of spreading peace and harmony, will hopefully calm you when dealing with annoying relatives. You won’t be able to carry this weekender to the dining table, but looking at it will remind you that you do get to go back to your place eventually.

[$89.00 The Sak]

Radical Read

We suppose it’s a little weird to be writing about wanting a book — but if you’ve read even a tiny excerpt of Rachel Shukert’s impossibly funny travel memoir, Everything Is Going to Be Great, you’ll understand. We started reading a copy of Shukert’s second book over the weekend at a friend’s house, but only made it halfway through — and now we can’t wait to finish it. Shukert’s hilarious tales of bungled travels abroad feature odd places, weird delicacies and even stranger men. It’s basically Eat, Pray, Love‘s younger, more fun sister (with a probable alcohol problem).

[$10.07 Amazon.com]

Istanbul Cab Drivers Are Also Belly Dancers And Stunt Men


My boyfriend and I are trying to plan a romantic getaway over Thanksgiving, so we spent our Saturday internet-researching possible destinations and hotels. Near the top of our list was Istanbul, so to get a better feeling for the city, we checked out some videos from the Lonely Planet travel guides. Here’s what we found: a crazy Istanbul cabbie who belly dances while driving (and outside your window while in traffic) and performs insane stunts. Check it out for a good Monday morning chuckle. (And for the record: we’ve whittled it down to Prague and Lisbon—the dancing cabbie had nothing to do with crossing Istanbul off the list.) [YouTube] Keep reading »

How Far Would You Go For Fashion?

A few weeks ago, my boyfriend and I took a day trip from Portland to Seattle. We stopped at the army surplus store downtown and acted like predictable tourists: trying on sailor hats and taking pictures and debating whether or not the Tommy gun will ever come back in style.

“Tomorrow we are going to Seattle so I can buy that rucksack.”

”I tried it on, shrieked with delight, and strutted around the store. It was super comfy and I imagined all the things I could carry in it, the stylish ruggedness it would bring to all my outfits.

But it was 30 dollars, and I hadn’t budgeted for that. “Besides,” I said. “Do I really need a rucksack?” I put it back on the shelf, we went out to dinner, and headed back to Portland.

The next couple weeks played out like a montage of events that necessitated owning a German rucksack. My laptop bag broke. I went for a hike with my brothers. I spent the night at a friend’s house and needed to lug a change of clothes around. I literally had dreams about this rucksack on at least three separate nights, one of which involved us (meaning the rucksack and myself) frolicking in a field of daisies, laughing and smiling, without a care in the world.

“Tomorrow we are going to Seattle so I can buy that rucksack.”

And we did. It was a six-hour drive round trip (I’d like to take this opportunity to publicly apologize to Al Gore and the ozone layer), but it was worth it. The other day I loaded up my rucksack with overdue books and rode my bike to the library, and I was truly happy. I also avoided subsequent overdue charges.


Victory is mine!

So here’s my question for you, dear readers: From standing in line overnight for an H&M opening to bribing a friend in London to send you a limited-edition lipstick to driving 300 miles to buy a rucksack, what’s the farthest you’ve gone for fashion? What’s the farthest you would go?

A Guide To Where The Cool Kids Are

When you jet to a hipster haven like San Francisco or Seattle, you don’t just want to visit the tourist traps. But how to find the best thrift shops and indie stores on unfamiliar terrain? GrassRoutes Travel has published five Urban Eco travel guides to point you in the thriftiest and most eco-friendly directions. These are your resources for finding the fair trade cafes, the cheapest indie music clubs, and the best vegan and organic foods. Bonus? Special maps to help you get around by foot and public transportation.

[$15.00 Buy Olympia]

Go Bookless With Wallpaper’s City Guides For iPhone

It’s obvious enough that “old-fashioned” guidebooks won’t help if you’re trying to pack light. No matter what your destination is, there are about a million travel iPhone apps out there for you to choose from, but we prefer Wallpaper’s City Guides. Why? For starters, we prefer to cut down on costs by not depleting our data allowance while abroad. These guides are all packed in there, so you don’t need a 3G network to access the info. And it’s only $3.99, which is less than you’d spend on any book.

[$3.99 iTunes]

10 Tips For The Savvy Traveler

We’re by no means “Up in the Air”-George-Clooney-type travelers, but we have learned a thing or two from our jaunts around the globe. Since it’s End of Summer Escapes Week here at The Frisky, it’s the perfect time to share them. After the jump, check out our tips on finding the best websites for local culture, how to deal with your money, benefit from airline mileage, and book cute hotels for cute prices. And feel free to share your own suggestions in the comments below! Keep reading »

Kiehl’s Mini-Products A La Carte

Kiehl’s addicts a) don’t travel without their Kiehl’s, and b) never want to waste a drop of it. We often find that while those generic mini-containers you can get to transfer shampoo into are a good idea, we end up wasting the product in the process (it spills over the sides and there’s residue left in the bottle). That’s why we figure that stocking up on Kiehl’s mini-sized goods is actually more resourceful in the long run. Rejoice! You can get all your favorite of the brand’s basics—Amino Acid Shampoo, Creme de Corps, Olive Fruit Oil Nourishing Conditioner—in perfectly portioned 2.5 oz. bottles or tubes.

[$721.00 Kiehl's]
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