Posts tagged "writing"

What It Takes … To Write A Novel (Part 3!)

Presenting the best advice on writing a novel, from novelists James Tadd Adcox, Susan Breen, and Kathleen Rooney! Plus, enter to win an amazing prize, including a 10-week fiction writing course!

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / July 8, 2015

What It Takes … To Write A Novel (Part 2!)

Presenting the best advice on writing a novel, from novelists James Tadd Adcox, Susan Breen, and Kathleen Rooney! Plus, enter to win an amazing prize, including a 10-week fiction writing course!

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / July 7, 2015

Yes, Please, Let E.L. James Write (And Tank) The Next “Fifty Shades” Movies

So apparently, on top of the fact that conflicts with Fifty Shades of Grey author E.L. James pushed director Sam Taylor-Johnson to the point that she felt like she never wanted to make another movie again, James now also wants to write the script for the next movie.

Oh, hallelujah!

Here’…

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / February 20, 2015

Where Writers Get Their Money: A Brief History Of The Privileges I Have And Have Not Enjoyed Over The Course Of My Career

“Here’s my life,” writes Ann Bauer on Salon. “My husband and I get up each morning at 7 o’clock and he showers while I make coffee. By the time he’s dressed I’m already sitting at my desk writing. He kisses me goodbye then leaves for the job where he makes good money, draws excellent benefits and…

By: Amelia McDonell-Parry / January 26, 2015

Of Course Art Can Change The World, If Only The Art World Wanted It To

VICE wrote up a cool panel discussion at Bard on the subject of politically engaged art today, but it was lacking an answer to the question it posed: Can art be a form of political activism?
The obvious answer is, well, yes, of course. I mean, look at Jacques-Louis David’s “The Death of Marat,”

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / January 12, 2015

How Did Dr. Seuss Create Green Eggs And Ham?

Ever wondered what corner of Ted “Dr. Seuss” Geisel’s brain Green Eggs and Ham came from? As it turns out, it came from the part that takes dares. The iconic book was conceived after a dare to write a book containing 50 words or less (it comes in at 50 exactly).
In this video,…

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / January 8, 2015

My New Year’s Resolution: Choose Oultrage Over Outrage

I find it edifying to look up the definitions and etymology of words that represent abstractions. Today it’s “outrage.” It’s being talked about a lot, not least of all because of Slate’s recent collection of articles on the subject, specifically how it has been proliferated by social media.
The English definition for “outrage” i…

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / December 22, 2014

Read The Cringe-Worthy Passage That Won The Bad Sex In Fiction Award

I am by no means a prude, but I’m more than happy to admit that reading sex scenes in fiction (or nonfiction, for that matter) skeeves me out a little. OK, a lot. I’m more on the “exhibitionist” end of the spectrum than the “voyeur” end, I guess.
Anyway, if you’re like me, get…

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / December 5, 2014

Life After Dating: Writing While Coupled

Over the weekend, my boyfriend Michael visited his mom and his sister, who was home from school for the weekend, out in the burbs. He told them he was going to propose to me soon, and his sister said she already knew that because she reads my work. Whoops! I’m so glad I don’t talk…

By: Rebecca Vipond Brink / November 3, 2014

Would You Buy A Typewriter With A Modern Twist?

Would you like to own a twee ’90s-style word processor that looks analogue enough to impress your hipster friends but still has a computer in it so you don’t get the shakes from glowing screen withdrawal? Would you like to sit in your local coffee shop with thick glasses and a furrowed brow, pounding away…

By: Claire Hannum / October 30, 2014

The Future Library Project Plants A Special Forest For Printing Books In 2114

A thousand trees have been planted in a forest outside Oslo, Norway to provide paper for a special anthology of 100 books to be published in 2114. Future Library, the ultimate public art project, was launched by Scottish artist Katie Paterson. Each year between now and 2114, a writer will contribute a book to be held…

By: Claire Hannum / August 24, 2014

True Story: My Memoir Pissed Off A Male Book Reviewer

When I started writing my memoir, Good Chinese Wife: A Love Affair With China Gone Wrong, I began networking with authors who wrote books set in Asia. I imagined developing solid friendships with a group of supportive authors. There’s a Chinese saying, huxiang bangzhu. It means “mutually helping one another.” That’s what I pictured.

By: Susan Blumberg-Kason / July 12, 2014

Jot It Down: 10 Statement Journals With A Message

You’re an adult now. It’s time to stop jotting things down on receipts and scraps of paper you found in your junk drawer. Whether you’re a writer who always needs a notebook handy, a dreamer who finds inspiration in everyday life or just your average on-the-move guy or gal, your daily musings and messages deserve…

By: Katie Oldenburg / June 5, 2014

Chipotle Now Serving Great Writing As A Free Side Dish

Have you ever run out to grab lunch alone, only to realize you didn’t bring your phone or a book or a magazine or anything to read while you eat? It’s super awkward and boring, right? Author Jonathan Safran Foer thought so too, while eating a burrito at Chipotle one day. “I really just wanted…

By: Winona Dimeo-Ediger / May 16, 2014

Life Dream Status: Amtrak Is Offering Writers’ Residencies

No more trying to find a coffee shop with reliable WiFi and clean bathrooms. No more praying your roommate can refrain from talking for half a day while you peck away on the keyboard. It’s still in the “test-run” phase, but it’s OK to get your hopes up because Amtrak has confirmed that it will…

By: Ami Angelowicz / February 24, 2014

The Exceptional Rise Of “I” And “Me”

According to a study published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, in an analysis of literature published between 1960 and 2008, the use of first person singular pronouns (I, me) increased by a staggering 42 percent. An article published in The Atlantic Wire looks at this exceptional rise in first person pronouns and writer Eric Levenso…

By: Ami Angelowicz / August 16, 2013

My Top 3 Favorite Female Essayists

Good non-fiction is hard to find. After about 3 years of working on turning my blog into a book, I amazingly and bafflingly have an e-book coming out (I Forgot To Be Famous) of essays . In writing it, I realized a few things. 1. A blog is not a book. 2. I will never be as good as these…

By: Almie Rose / July 1, 2013

5 Lessons I’ve Learned From Writing About My Relationships On The Frisky

For the last five years (longer, if you include the six months I worked on the site before we actually launched), I’ve been editing The Frisky. But I’ve also done quite a bit of writing for the site, particularly about sex and relationships. In addition to humorously, I hope, commenting on the state of dating…

By: Amelia McDonell-Parry / March 19, 2013

A Note About Being A Female Blogger — And The Sexual Harassment That Comes With It

This is not directed at any one person. This is something I feel I have to say on behalf of myself and possibly many other female bloggers out there.
It makes my freaking day when people email me or comment or come up to me in public and tell me that they like my…

By: Almie Rose / February 19, 2013

Pen, Pencil Or Sloth? Now You Can Draw With All Of ‘Em

Regular writing utensils are so boring. That’s why we’re super into this new app that let’s you draw with sloths. Yes, that’s right, sloths. The Sloths.AreRad.com gives you the sloth option (the app’s eraser is a moonraser, of course). I’ve drawn a note for Amelia in sloth, because she hates them and they make her…

By: Julie Gerstein / December 30, 2012
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