Tag Archives: words

This Linguistic Map Of The U.S. Fails To Take Into Account The Full Range Of “You” Expressions

you vs yinz linguistic map

I’m totally fascinated by the way people talk. Accents, vocabulary and emphasis varies so much, depending on where in the country you live. I lived in the Midwest (land of “pop,” not “soda”) until I was 9, which is probably why my speaking accent is generally pretty flat and indistinct. But I also happened to move with my family to the South and the Northeast, so I’ve heard a wide range of accents and ways of speaking. My flat accent is probably why I won my fifth grade declamation contest when I lived in Fort Worth, Texas. (It was with a poem creepily titled “Touch of the Master’s Hand,” ahem.)

Joshua Katz, a Ph.D. student in statistics at North Carolina State University, created a series of 22 maps exploring the varied and wonderful language and pronunciations around the country. Katz looked at everything from the way people pronounce the word “lawyer,” to the various and sundry terms for traffic circles (roundabouts, rotaries, etc.). The data is really fun to look at, but I must take exception with his discussion of how people around the country address a group. Yes, there’s “y’all” in the South, “you guys” in the West and “you all” in a small pocket of Kentucky. But there’s also “youse” in Philadelphia and “yinz” in Baltimore and Pittsburgh!

Take a look at Katz’s map, and some of the other ones at the link and tell us about the little phrases and words people say where you live!

Words We Hate
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"Twerk" in the dictionary
Twerk Has Been Added To The Oxford Dictionary
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Douchebags, Sluts & Boners: The Origins Of Some Of The Most Well-Known Slang Words & Insults

Boner. It hasn’t always referred to a penis, you know. In fact, in the early ’80s, there was a sitcom character named Boner, that had absolutely nothing to do with erections. But for those of us born in the ’90s, the term will likely be linked to hard-ons.

There are quite a few words like this — words that may have started out innocently enough but are now “not-ready-for-prime-time” terms. We thought it’d be interesting to explore where words like douchebag, twat and cunt came from. It’s not always where you’d think!

Words We Hate
We want to retire these words and phrases forever. Read More »
New Scrabble Words
G-R-R-L, did you hear about the new word allowed in Scrabble? Read More »
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"Make water," "smallclothes," and other words and phrases from the series. Read More »

6 Made Up Nerd Words That Made It To Common Usage, Plus 8 That Should

Let me let you in on a little secret: writers like words. We like them so much. And so where you might wrinkle your nose and wonder why on earth someone might used the word “pulchritudinous” instead of “pretty,” we’re sitting at our desks and cackling with delight.

We got to use “pulchritudinous” today. And it alliterated.

But as a geek or nerd, you get introduced to new words all the time! Science fiction and fantasy are practically in the business; not just of creating new place names, which is a given; but also of making new nouns in general, new verbs, and new adjectives. And while some of those concepts might not be particularly useful outside of their fictional setting, others have, over time, been accepted wholly by the English of reality. With some of these, we’ve forgotten that they were ever words in fiction to begin with.

And so we present six made up words that have since become inextricable from their meaning outside of their fictional origin (runners up include the very mimsy word “vorpal”), and, because we love words, eight words that we would like to say all the time and not get weird looks for (runners up include twip, shwey, slag, and every other silly, silly curse word from Batman Beyond). Read more…

No, That’s Not ADORKable: Words That Need to Be Retired–Now

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Annoying Tech Talk
Geeky terms that drive us crazy. Read More »

I blame Zooey Deschanel. Not just because I blame Zooey Deschanel for most of my problems — why men in my demographic seem to all want some unattainable manic pixie dream girl, why my bangs will never be perfect — but I specifically blame her for the rise of the word “Adorkable.” Deschanel used it on her new TV show “The New Girl” and somehow, inexplicably, it has taken hold. And it is a terrible word.

But “adorkable”–which we assume means something or someone that’s both dorky and adorable–is hardly the only newish term that’s made a creeping rise into our vocabularies and the general consciousness. We’ve come to cringe at a variety of oft-heard terms. Below, the words, phrases and annoying sayings that we’re hoping we won’t hear in 2012. And please, feel free to add your own “adorkables” in the comments. Keep reading »

Outrage! “Cassette Tape” Removed From The Oxford English Dictionary

Do you want to feel old? Really old? While words like sexting, jeggings and mankini have found their way into the collective consciousness, one term has been exorcised forever from the official record of English language — “cassette tape.” According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “cassette tape” will no longer appear in future editions of the publication, having been replaced by tons of text speak, such as LOL, OMG, and <3. Yes, the text sign for “love” is the OED, but cassette tape is not. And this, my friends, is just WRONG. Keep reading »

“LOL,” “OMG,” “♥” And “Muffin Top” Added To The Oxford English Dictionary

OMFG, I am LMAO. Apparently, the Oxford English Dictionary announced some new additions to its iconic pages this week. A few of the words being taken into the fold: “LOL,” “OMG,” and “♥.” And yes, they are fully aware of the fact that these are not actually words. The OED calls them “initialisms” and explains “there often seems to be a bit more than simple abbreviation going on.” They say the expressions can be an “informal, gossipy mode of expression” or can “parody the level of unreflective enthusiasm or overstatement that can sometimes appear in online discourse.” So highbrow for text talk, no?

Also interesting: apparently, the first use of OMG appeared in a letter in 1917. And LOL goes back to 1960, only then it meant “little old lady.” Keep reading »

What Do The Words “Spillcam,” “Vuvuzela,” And “Refudiate” All Have In Common?

“Spillcam,” “vuvuzela,” and “refudiate” are three of the most important words of 2010. Yup! The Global Language Monitor has just announced its all-important list of the top ten words of the year. Oooh, this is fun. It feels strangely scholastic, doesn’t it? Oh well, let’s go with it. The full list of the most important words of 2010 after the jump. Please note: your pop quiz on all the words and definitions will be held tomorrow at 10 a.m. Extra credit will be given to Friskians who can use all ten words in a sentence. Uh oh, my former teacher is showing. Keep reading »

The Strange Evolution Of The Word “Dude”

Maybe two years ago, a strange word came out of my mouth: “dude.” I don’t know why it came to mind or what inspired me to use it exactly. But next thing I knew, the word was back in full force and, oh, pretty much everyone was saying it. So I was very excited to see a piece titled “History of the ‘Dude’” on a website called Good today. The piece charts the different uses of the word, and shows that it has gone through quite an evolution in the years. It started off in the 1800s being a word to describe a man who went slightly overboard with his penchant for fashion, kind of like the word “dandy.” Then in the American West, it took on the new connotation of a city dweller visiting a ranch. Keep reading »

25 Words And Phrases We Want To Retire

There are some words and phrases that we here at The Frisky are so over hearing that whenever one of us utters one, someone else says, “Can we retire that word yet?” So far we haven’t been successful in coaxing any of the words into a condo in Boca Raton to live out their Golden Years in relative silence. But maybe if we all work together, we can limit their appearance in everyday speech. After the jump, words and phrases we’re ready to see retire! Keep reading »

20 Words That Gross Us Out More Than “Moist”

Moist is a word a lot of people seem to hate. In an article on GOOD, the writer resurrects a word-aversion discussion about that and other words.

Back in 2007, Salon covered the “moist” debate, pointing out that women might not like it because it reminds us of yeast infections or sexual arousal, rather than cakes baked to perfection. For whatever reason, there are certain words that people love to hate. They just don’t sound right, or they bring about bad memories.

Moist doesn’t bother us so much, but there are a few other words that get our panties in a twist, including panty (singular is worse than plural). Keep reading »

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