Tag Archives: women writers

Are We Really Surprised That James Franco Has No Space On His Bookshelf For Women Writers?

What Your Bookshelf Says
Ever wondered what your bookshelf says about you? Read More »

James Franco, in addition to being an actor, performance artist, director and avid Instagrammer, is a writer of both fiction and poetry. He’s a big reader too — he’s currently starring on Broadway in “Of Mice and Men” — and one of his many upcoming projects includes a film adaptation of William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. In a recent interview with Shelf Awareness, Franco discussed some of the writers from contemporary literature who’ve influenced and had an impact on him, both as a writer and as a person. David Foster Wallace! Cormac McCarthy! Great writers indeed. But of the writers discussed in the interview — including Franco’s Top 11 list of all time faves — not a single one was a woman. (Wait, I lied. Asked to name a book he bought based on the cover alone, Franco offered up Madonna’s Sex. So yeah, let’s not count that one.)

I would sigh, but I am not the slightest bit surprised. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Yes, Women Writers Without Kids “Understand Human Emotions”

Defending Chick Lit
Why Jennifer Egan was wrong to diss the genre. Read More »
Friends With Kids
Oh look, an ensemble cast that does not look godawful. Read More »
Broken Biological Clock
Some biological clocks just don't tick. Read More »

The death of Irish novelist Maeve Binchy earlier this week has inspired a lot of articles, most of them warm tributes to her kind heart, quick wit, and writing ability.

British novelist Amanda Craig took a different tack.

In a piece published today by The Telegraph, she wonders whether Binchy might have been a better writer if she had been a mother. The subtitle is even more blunt, asking: “Does a female novelist need to have experienced motherhood to truly understand human emotions?” Keep reading »

Salon Ends Broadsheet Blog, Announces Tracy Clark-Flory’s New Role

For many Frisky staffers, and Frisky readers, we’re sure, Salon’s Broadsheet blog is a daily must-read. A so-called “feminist” blog, Broadsheet has always been more than that — a blog about politics, sex, and cultural trends that just so happens to look at those subjects through the female lens. Now, Salon has announced Broadsheet will be no more. Which is sad. But we’re thrilled to hear that one of our favorite lady writers, Tracy Clark-Flory, who has been at the helm of Broadsheet for the last year, will still be writing for Salon but focusing on long-form original reporting on sex, relationships, and, we’d imagine, feminism. We’re looking forward to more of her insightful, thoughtful, and balanced work that never ceases to make us think. BTW, if you’d like to share your earliest sex memories with Tracy for an upcoming story, she’s looking for interviewees. [Salon] Keep reading »

Ex-Gawker Editor Emily Gould On Women Writers

I feel bad for Emily Gould. Next week, the former editor of gossip blog Gawker.com will publish her first book, a collection of personal essays called And The Heart Says Whatever. And when I think about what’s going to happen to her, I just want to shield my eyes.

You see, almost two years ago exactly, Emily Gould landed on the cover of The New York Times Magazine for an article published in it, “Exposed: Blog Post Confidential.” If people hated her article (several thousand words about how her sometimes nasty blogging for Gawker complicated or ruined her personal relationships), they hated her cover photo even more: Gould lying on her bed in a tank top, staring up at the camera. The types of internet comments her piece provoked included cyberbullying-ish put-downs like “narcissists,” “narcissistic pipsqueak,” “immature,” “intellectual midget,” “navel-gazing,” “idiots with big mouths,” “undiagnosed psych disorder,” and “Now I understand the timeless appeal of public stoning.” Yeesh.

As another young female writer, watching this scared the crap out of me. I should probably be old enough to know better than to get rattled by all that haterade, but I worry about the young female writers in high schools across the country who see that and then learn, “This is what will happen if I write about myself.” Keep reading »

Advice For Women Who Aspire To Be Writers

We’d imagine that among you voracious readers of The Frisky, there are writers and aspiring writers. No doubt, writing is one of the trickiest arts around, and yet we here at the site count ourselves as lucky that we get to do it every day. Across the pond, the Guardian has rounded up “Ten Rules for Writing Fiction,” with advice from some of the best writers at work today. While these tips are geared towards fiction writers, many of them are equally relevant whether you’re thinking about writing a novel, running a blog, or write for a living. After the jump, a few of our favorite tidbits of writing advice. Keep reading »

What Are Women Fighting About? Ask Emily Gould

Emily Gould should know about women writers and criticism. In the spring of 2008, the former editor at Gawker published an article in the prestigious New York Times Magazine about nastiness in the blogosphere—to a certain extent, it was her own nastiness towards Gawker’s victims that she was referencing. Plenty of other writers responded in kind, mostly critical, and some of the critics were women annoyed with both Gould’s gossip-blog past as well as her sexily-reclining-on-her-back cover photo, saying: Emily Gould does not represent us.

Recently in an article called “What Are Women Fighting About?” for More Intelligent Life, Gould tackles the issue of how “women are often the cruelest critics of other female writers” for not accurately portraying women’s lives. Gendered critiques of women writers are a problem that’s dragged on for a long time (Anna Clark wrote about their “ambition condition” for Bitch magazine over a year ago). But Gould’s analysis is at least refreshing because, by her essay’s end, she has pledged to be more aware of her overly-critical-towards-women ways. Keep reading »

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