Tag Archives: women of color

True Story: A Photoshopping Site Stole My Selfie Off Instagram And Gave Me A “Makeover” [UPDATE]

UPDATE, 5:40p.m.: @photoshop_fantasy has issued an apology on their Instagram page, although it appears all the same images are still up :

Hello lovely followers! We want to apologize for the inconveniences this account has caused with the unadvised photoshops. We deleted them and promise to not do these again without permission. What we did was wrong and we are sorry, and we certainly didn’t intend to hurt anyone. Thank you for your comprehension!

UPDATE, 5p.m.: @photoshop_fantasy has finally removed Carrie Nelson’s photo from their Instagram page. 

Last week, the Internet exploded in a debate about women and selfies. Are they feminist? Are they empowering? Are they a “cry for help”? For anyone not up-to-date, Amelia has written a solid summation of the dialogue thusfar.

I feel indifferent toward selfies. I have no problem when friends, acquaintances, or strangers post them, but I rarely share them myself. I’m not much of a photographer, and when I do take photos, I rarely position myself as the subject. But sometimes, I take selfies. Sometimes, when I think I look pretty or silly, or when I just want to express a feeling through my face, I take a selfie and share it online. It’s not part of my everyday life, but it’s an occasional fun indulgence for which I feel no guilt.

This past Sunday was one such day when I felt like taking a selfie. For the past few months, I have been struggling with depression, anxiety, and overcoming trauma, so it is often difficult for me to force myself out of bed, particularly on a cold weekend morning when my bed is so warm and comfy. Without thinking much about it, I snapped a selfie with my iPad. I took a photo of myself in bed, still disheveled from a restless night of sleep. More than anything, I was curious to know what I looked like in that particular moment. What I saw was a face that captured so much of what I have been feeling recently: exhaustion, sadness, and determination. Somehow, I managed to make all of those emotions visible and beautiful, in one snapshot of my face. Plus, the wisps of hair across my forehead added a casual charm that made me feel just a little bit sexy. I opened the photo in Instagram, added the Earlybird filter (perfect for early morning selfies), and captioned the photo “Good morning #bedselfie #sundaymorning #stillsleepy #nomakeup.” I posted the photo to Instagram, without sharing it on any other social networks, and went on with my day. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: On #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen; Feminism Is Not Black And White

On Hugo Schwyzer
The Soapbox: On Hugo Schwyzer, Personal Essay Writing & Redemption
Schwyzer's fall and what it says about redemption narratives. Read More »
Schwyzer's Meltdown
Hugo Schwyzer Has What Appears To Be Major Manic Episode On Twitter
Manic episode or more manipulative bullshit? Read More »
Soapbox: Colorstruck
Is Hollywood still colorstruck? Read More »
The Soapbox: On #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, Race & Feminism

The Internet exploded in feminist calamity yesterday over the racist, sexist, patriarchal, abuse-laden behavior of Hugo Schwyzer, an allegedly a self-described* mentally ill (former) professor of women’s studies at Pasadena City College. Schwyzer divulged information that is classically tucked away behind the buttressed walls of systemic white privilege. Anecdotally, it’s akin to the ENRON scandal, the ACORN scandal and the unprecedented shit show that was the financial collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008. Thematically each of these exposed, in an exceptional way, the clandestine systemic privileges that sustain long-term oppression: economic, racial, civic or otherwise.

Schwyzer, a self-identified male feminist made his claim to Internet fame by reworking and packaging up modern male feminism and selling  it to online publications like The Atlantic and Jezebel, for whom he was a paid contributor, and Feministe, which featured an interview with him. Two of these three are notorious for their insensitivity and, on more than one occasion, outright disregard for the importance of intersectional feminism – that is the focal point where feminism and another powerful system meet, say for instance, race. These cyber tropes, which have staked claim as the premier source for all things feminist, prioritize clicks over everything else, as beautifully explained by blogger Flavia Dzodan. In matters of the heart, their feminist ideology dematerializes – often at the expense of women of color and other marginalized women.

Keep reading »

Kickstarter Campaign To Raise Money For “Miss Zee” Coloring Book Depicting Black Girls

Racist Cartoon
Kevin Hart's cartoon msg to black women is offensive and not funny. Read More »
Tantrum Arrest
Salecia Johnson photo
A six-year-old girl was arrested for a temper tantrum. Read More »
WIC Report
Today's Lady News photo
An analysis was released on the status of women of color in the U.S. Read More »
Miss Zee coloring book
  • Designer Miss Gee of Louisville, Kentucky, is trying to raise $5,000 via Kickstarter for a line of coloring books for young black girls. Also a mama, she wanted to find coloring books for her daughter, Zee, and was unable to find ones that depicted characters that looked like her daughter. It’s a worthy project and certainly one I hope Frisky readers will support! [Clutch Magazine]
  • Gregory Peterson, a Republican fundraiser who co-chaired an event for Mitt Romney, has been arrested for kidnapping and raping multiple women. Peterson, of Utah, was charged with nine counts of forcible sexual abuse, seven counts of rape, three counts of aggravated rape, two counts of aggravated kidnapping, forcible sodomy, assault, burglary and sexual battery. Peterson harmed at least four women, whom he met both at church and via an online dating website. [Raw Story]
  • The Creole art gallery in Lansing, Michigan, is looking for vagina-themed artwork for an exhibit called “The Vagina Show,” coordinated in response to the recent foolishness over the word “vagina” being used in the state’s House of Representatives. [Detroit News] Keep reading »

Analysis Released On Status Of Women Of Color In The U.S.

Today's Lady News photo
  • The Center For American Progress has released an analysis on the status of women of color in the United States, which had some disconcerting findings, such as that WOC are more likely to occupy lower-paying jobs than women of other races, which leads to $434,000 in lost wages over a lifetime. Also, WOC make up 53 percent of the medically uninsured. [Madame Noire]
  • Female troops who were sexually assaulted at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, have taken the stand this week. [Washington Post]
  • The Mississippi Department of Health has inspected the state’s lone operating abortion clinic. It now has 10 days to issue findings that will determine if the clinic is allowed to stay open. [CBS News] Keep reading »

Michelle Obama Is The First Lady Of The World

While Americans have been focused on Michelle Obama’s wardrobe choices and how she’s advancing the careers of younger designers, women in other countries are more concerned with how she’s boosting their lives and self-worth. In India, one woman says Michelle “shows women that it’s OK to have dark skin and to not have a son,” which are normally looked down upon in her country. In Vietnam, women marvel that Michelle walks beside her husband, rather than behind him. Thu Nguyen says women in her country “are not human beings,” but Michelle shows women can do anything. Keep reading »

Vogue Italia’s “Black Issue” Doesn’t Address The Real Issue

I can’t remember the last time I picked up a lady mag and saw an African-American woman on the cover that wasn’t Halle Berry. The beauty and hair advice doled out in these magazines is targeted at white women unless otherwise noted and the major runway shows are pitifully powder white (Eastern-European is very in). It’s sucky, to say the least. Vogue Italia decided to do something about it, declaring their July issue “The Black Issue” — all of the featured models would be Black and all the featured content would address Black women. This is all fine and dandy on a purely surface level I suppose, except that by making this issue “special” they’ve defined all other, white-centric issues as the usual and the norm. Rather than having more women of color in every issue, targeting a single issue at one ethnic group doesn’t really do anything to increase diversity, now does it? That’s weak. [NY Times] Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular