Tag Archives: women in hollywood

Where Are All The Women Directors At Cannes? An Infographic Shows Just How Bad It Is

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The Cannes Film Festival begins today in France. Movie stars along the French Riviera sounds lovely, of course. But Cannes, and every other film festival, is always a reminder of women director’s underrepresentation in the movie business. In the past decade at Cannes, there have been several years when ZERO female directors have had a feature film screened — and that’s in pools of, like, 22 competing films. Keep reading »

Women Didn’t Fare Well In “Star Wars VII” Casting Announcements

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  • The casting announcement for “Star Wars VII” came out today and while that’s very exciting news indeed, let’s not forget that only one new female actress (Daisy Ridley) has been added to the cast. Don’t women and girls deserve better geeky representation? [io9]
  • Lux Alptraum on why we don’t need fewer rape story lines on TV, we need smarter ones. [Nerve]
  • A new group called the 30% club is pushing to add more women to senior leadership management. [New York Times]
  • Tennessee’s governor is still unsure on whether he will veto a law punishing drug-addicted pregnant women. [Nashville Public Radio] Keep reading »

Aaron Sorkin Man-Splains The Lack Of Good Roles For Women In Hollywood

Kirsten Dunst Implies That Actresses Ask To Be Sexually Harassed

Sofia Coppola: I feel like you and I are so on the same page about how to approach things. Have you ever worked with a director you didn’t agree with? And if so, what did you do?

Kirsten Dunst: I have, and it takes all the fun out of what you do. You just get through it instead of having a meaningful experience.

SC: What if a director pounces on you while working? Has that ever happened?

KD: No [laughs]. I don’t give off that vibe. I think that you court that stuff, and to me it’s crossing a boundary that would hinder the trust in your working relationship.

Kirsten Dunst is a real dingaling, isn’t she? First, in an interview with Harper’s Bazaar last month, she professed her love for traditional gender roles, telling the mag, “You need a man to be a man and a woman to be a woman.” And now, in an interview with her “Marie Antoinette” director, Sofia Coppola, for W, Kirsten rather smugly says that she hasn’t ever been sexually harassed by a director because she doesn’t give of “that vibe” or “court that stuff.” In other words, if you’re an actress that has been sexually harassed by someone with power in the industry, you must have asked for it. It’s almost like she’s conflating sexual harassment with a consensual affair, as if the two things are the same and/or cross the same boundary. But they aren’t the same. At all. Seriously, Kirsten, hush. [Defamer]

The Soapbox: Why Will Ferrell’s New Female-Focused Production Department Isn’t Cause For Celebration

The Soapbox: Why Will Ferrell's New Female-Focused Production Department Isn't Cause For Celebration

Yesterday, Will Ferrell’s company, Gary Sanchez Productions, announced that it is launching a female-focused film and television department called Gloria Sanchez Productions. The idea came from Jessica Elbaum, an exec at Gary Sanchez, who will head the division.

This is exciting news, but I think they missed a major point. I believe people are at their funniest, smartest, most moral and most complete when they exist together. Gary Sanchez Productions is like an apartment with no living room. Yes, it’s vital and sanity-saving to have your own room, but all the best stuff happens in the living room, where people congregate and everyone feels like they belong. While I love the new Girls Room of Gary Sanchez Productions, it doesn’t improve what has been going on in the Boys Room at all. Keep reading »

So Not Fetch: The MPAA Tried To Give “Mean Girls” An R Rating

“We had lots of battles with the ratings board on the movie. There was the line, ‘Amber D’Alessio gave a blow job to a hot dog,’ which eventually became ‘Amber D’Alessio made out with a hot dog.’ Which is somehow weirder! That’s the thing we found: When you’re trying to make a joke obey the rules and not use any bad words, it can actually become seamier, even. … The line in the sand that I drew was the joke about the wide-set vagina. The ratings board said, ‘We can’t give you a PG-13 unless you cut that line.’ We ended up playing the card that the ratings board was sexist, because ‘Anchorma’n had just come out, and Ron Burgundy had an erection in one scene, and that was PG-13. We told them, ‘You’re only saying this because it’s a girl, and she’s talking about a part of her anatomy. There’s no sexual context whatsoever, and to say this is restrictive to an audience of girls is demeaning to all women.’ And they eventually had to back down.”

In honor of the 10th anniversary of “Mean Girls” (gah, I’m old), director Mark Waters shared 10 juicy behind-the-scenes tales from Tina Fey’s best movie ever. In addition to sharing that Rachel McAdams was almost cast as Cady Heron, Amanda Seyfried was almost cast as Regina George, and Amy Poehler was almost not cast at all, Waters shared a particularly sexist struggle that the filmmakers had with the MPAA board. The movie ratings organization is notoriously more condemnatory when it’s female sexual pleasure onscreen (rather than male) as well as slang words about female anatomy. (Watch the documentary “This Film Is Not Yet Rated” for so much appalling shit about the MPAA.) Not surprisingly, the latter was absolutely true in the case of “Mean Girls,” where the filmmakers had to fight valiantly to keep in the phrase “wide-set vagina.” Oh, Tina Fey. Keep on fighting the good fight. [NYMag.com]

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