Tag Archives: woman

What Was Your “Holy Crap, I’m An Adult” Moment?

Adulthood — what is it and what does it mean to you? For some, the transition to grown-ass woman status can seem murky and ephemeral. But for others, it’s easy to locate a turning point, a shift, a change in perspective from “girl” to “woman.”

I thought about this as I perused the chef’s knives at Williams-Sonoma one day last week: buying fancy knives to replace my crappy Ikea set seemed very smart and adult. Weirdly, it represented a shift in focus — a few years ago, I’d have probably blown that $150 on drinks and take-out or an unnecessary dress, and instead I was buying crazy expensive knives! To cook with!

But adulthood is different for everyone. When did you most feel like an adult? After the jump: some of our silly and scary adult moments. Keep reading »

The Secret To French Marriages?

Infidelity. I can’t decide if I’m totally shocked or wholly unsurprised by the U.K.’s Daily Mail claim that French women get married knowing (and expecting) their husbands will cheat. When Brit Lucy Wadham married her French boyfriend she had no idea he would keep on keeping on in the bedroom with all of his ex-lovers. She details a night she unknowingly attended what’s called a partouze, subtle French for “group trysts”—only figuring it out after stumbling in on three dinner party guests in a guest bedroom. Infidelity was (and is) a way of life, she explains—and not without her own propositions, either!

This all just brings us back to the universal relationship question—are we or aren’t we built for monogamy? Is marital bliss something to work for or shall we think like the French and embrace our genetic need for multiple partners? [Daily Mail U.K.] Keep reading »

Can A Homemaker Be A Feminist?

I was raised by a working, single mother. She went to Stanford, majored in economics, became a public school teacher, wrote a book, and now works as a journalist. She didn’t give up her job when she had my sister or me, and she certainly didn’t give it up after she and my father divorced. I consider her the ultimate feminist — she’s worked her butt off, made a living on her own, and raised two perfect daughters (just kidding). She’s my hero. But if she had quit her job when I was born, retiring at age 31, would she still be my #1 role model? It’s hard to say.
Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular