Tag Archives: weight issues

What I’ve Learned About Size And Body Image By Dating A Fat Man

What I’ve Learned About Size And Body Image By Dating A Fat Man

I thought I’d dealt with most of my body image issues before I started dating my current boyfriend. But during the three years we’ve been together, he’s taught me a lot about size, fatness and self-care. How? By being fat and unapologetic.

My boyfriend weighs over 300 pounds, and one of the things I appreciated right away is that he didn’t hesitate to call himself “fat.” Why would he? For him it’s a description, not an epithet. That alone was startling to me, having dated my share of men and women who were far from accepting of their bodies. Keep reading »

My Friends Deserve Better Than Fat Talk

My Friends Deserve Better Than Fat Talk

If you’ve read Tiny Beautiful Things, the collection of responses by The Rumpus’ self-help columnist “Sugar,” aka Wild author Cheryl Strayed, you’ll probably recognize this quote:

“Stop worrying about whether you’re fat. You’re not fat. Or rather, you’re sometimes a little bit fat, but who gives a shit? There is nothing more boring and fruitless than a woman lamenting the fact that her stomach is round.”

Well, damn. Keep reading »

Mindy Kaling To Vogue: “I Don’t Want To Be Skinny”

“There’s a whole list of things I would probably change about myself. For example, I’m always trying to lose fifteen pounds. But I never need to be skinny. I don’t want to be skinny. I’m constantly in a state of self-improvement, but I don’t beat myself up over it. … It’s really tempting not to take chances [with fashion]. But I don’t want to be fearful. I don’t want my tombstone to say, she hid her imperfections well on the red carpet.”

Mindy Kaling dared to tell Vogue that she has no interest in being skinny and, amazingly, the world did not explode. I love how honest Kaling is about, yes, trying to lose weight, but also acknowledging that the pursuit of skinniness — being and looking skinny – is not the most important thing in the world. Love her. [Vogue]

Into The Archives: 1957′s The Scientific & Easy Way To Gain Weight Is The Weirdest Diet Book Of All Time

Into The Archives: 1957's The Scientific & Easy Way To Gain Weight Is The Most Shocking Diet Book Of All Time

My mom gave me treasure: a small pile of small paperback books produced by someone named Jose Bonomo who may or may not be a real person, from the 1950s-1960’s on various womanly things, like how to have flawless hair, makeup, figures, diets, and even parties. I feel like I am a 1960’s housewife in the modern world, despite not being married. I want to write the feminists’ guide to being a single 1960’s housewife, which I realize makes no sense and is contradictory, but I’m just so curious about how women lived in the ‘50s and ‘60s (thanks, “Mad Men”). I want to know how they did their hair, makeup, and maintained their figures.

So when I saw this one diet book in particular, I thought I misread the title. But no, I hadn’t, it’s actually a book titled The Scientific & Easy Way to Gain Wight. The cover shows an illustration of a thin woman measuring her thighs. “SHOWS YOU HOW TO ADD POUNDS AND INCHES” the book assures, while proclaiming, “SENSIBLE! SURE!” Keep reading »

“Breaking Bad” Actress Explains Weight Gain

Anna Gunn plays wife Skyler Grey to Bryan Cranston’s Walter White on one of the most beloved shows (“Breaking Bad”) to ever be on television, and she just won an Emmy, and yet she feels she has to explain herself for gaining weight. Read more at Evil Beet Gossip…

Worst Grandma In The World Complains About Fat 6-Month-Old

worst grandma in the world complains about fat baby

This weekend in the New York Times Social Q’s column, a woman wrote in to inquire about how to handle a ruthless grandma who is obsessed with her six-month-old granddaughter’s weight:

My husband and I have a beautiful 6-month-old daughter. She is chubby but not overweight by any means. My mother-in-law, who obviously has a weight obsession and is quite thin, has started making comments about my daughter’s size: “I can’t believe her legs are so big when she kicks all the time.” Or: “She’ll thin out when she starts to crawl.” My husband knows that these comments bother me, but he will not address them with her. I want to protect my daughter from her grandmother’s damaging and unhealthy fixation with weight. What should I do?

Okay, what kind of sick person body snarks a six-month-old baby? I don’t have kids, so I might be wrong about this, but aren’t babies supposed to be fat? I did not know that having a fat six-month-old was a problem you could have. Keep reading »

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