Huh? Good Men Project Founder Calls NY Times Piece On The Benefits Of Paternity Leave An “Attack On Dads-At-Large”

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Feminist & SAHM?
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Last week, The New York Times published a fairly straight forward news piece on the bountiful array of studies conducted here and in other parts of the world that suggest that offering paternity leave to new fathers could actually help stimulate the U.S. economy while also supporting women in their quest for work/life balance. The piece starts off with a brief anecdote from writer Catherine Rampell’s personal experience, about having two relationships come to an end because the men she was dating expressed a desire to see her eventually put aside her career, at least temporarily, should their relationship become so serious that they get married and have children. She writes:

I don’t pretend to know how common this situation is, and how many other young women have found themselves in it. But it clarified not only the choices that future mothers must make about their careers, but also how early in their careers they must begin to think about them. And while fairness and feminism may urge us to find better ways for women to balance work and life — Sheryl Sandberg and Anne-Marie Slaughter have certainly made impassioned cries — the most convincing argument seems to be an economic one.

The rest Rampell’s piece focuses on how women who hope to have children someday have a better shot at being successful at “leaning in” at work if their male partners are “leaning in” more at home, and are being given the support to do so via things like paternity leave.  And, more importantly, should the United States follow in the footsteps of countries like Sweden and Norway and offer paternity leave, it would not only benefit those straight couples who chose to partake in more balanced work-life accommodations, but the economy as a whole. Men would be given the flexibility to spend those precious early weeks with their children, women wouldn’t find putting their careers on the backburner the more financially feasible option, and, by keeping more women in the workforce, the economy would grow. Rampell offers a whole bunch of supporting evidence and, all in all, it is one of the least objectionable pieces I’ve read on the benefits of  our society striving towards equality for men and women at work and in the home.

But lo and behold, one person managed to be deeply offended by Rampell’s article: Tom Matlack, the founding editor of The Good Men Project, who published a response called “What’s A Guy To Do?”, which, among other things, calls Rampell’s piece an “attack on dads-at-large.” Say what? Continue reading

Frisky Rant: I Really Don’t Care To Know What Men Think About Makeup Because They’re Not Being Truthful Anyway

Makeup At The Gym
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Argan oil. Primer. BB Cream. Foundation. Maybe a little concealer. Pressed powder. Bronzer. Blush. Eyeshadow. Another color eye shadow. Eyeliner. Eyebrow pencil. Mascara. Lip gloss.

That’s 14 products. I use 14 products to achieve my usual daily makeup look, which most would describe as “natural.” Fourteen products go into making me look like I’m not wearing 14 products. Strangely enough, I probably use a few less products when I’m going for something bolder or less “natural.” The point being, it actually takes as many if not more makeup to achieve the “natural” look.

I am pretty sure many men don’t realize this, however. Take, for example, Tom Matlack, founder of the Good Men Project, who contributes his thoughts to The New York Times‘ “Room For Debate” discussion about women and makeup today. Continue reading

Today’s Lady News: UVM Frat Closed Indefinitely, Plus Controversy At The Good Men Project

  • The national body of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity has decided to close their UVM chapter indefinitely following that “Who would you rape?” survey scandal. [Burlington Free Press]
  • Has the women’s rights movement screwed over poor women? [Jezebel]
  • Sigh. Sarah Palin continues to tease that she may still run for President, saying, “It’s not too late…” Shit or get off the pot, Palin! Make a decision! [Huffington Post]
  • Feministing has launched a new column about feminism and academia. Check it out and tell us what you think! [Feministing]
    Continue reading