Tag Archives: supreme court

8 Craft Stores To Shop At Instead Of Hobby Lobby

hobby lobby boycott

I learned about sweatshops towards the end of junior high and I remember being deeply troubled. A burgeoning activist, I decided to boycott all clothing stores that sold products made in sweatshops. A quick AOL internet search (#old) revealed that my boycott would actually be incredibly difficult — if not impossible — given that I did not have my own money, transportation or sewing skills. The boycott was abandoned. With the exception of the fair trade purchasing when I do when it’s convenient, it hasn’t reared its head since.

Boycotting Hobby Lobby, however, is easy. The first reason is that I’ve never actually laid eyes on one. Frankly, I didn’t know it existed before they took it upon themselves to save all the unborn fetuses of crafty shift-workers of America. There is only one Hobby Lobby in my hometown San Diego, and it’s about an hour’s drive from my family home. The same is true in Boston, the other American city in which I’ve dwelled. In my current home of Melbourne, Australia, there is literally not a Hobby Lobby in the hemisphere. So you see, my boycott is a bit ridiculous but also VERY MEANINGFUL, you know?

I say this because I know that a boycott can be inconvenient. As the tidal wave of shit that is the recent Supreme Court decision drifts further into the past, it will seem less important to drive an extra 10 minutes to buy your yarn. Keep reading »

How To Ignore The Relentless Flow Of Sexist BS So You Don’t Live In Constant Rage

How to Ignore the Relentless Flow of Sexist BS So You Don't Live in Constant Rage

As you all know, the Supreme Court of what is apparently a democratic republic founded on the principle of individual liberty and respect for the diversity of humanity decided this week that women aren’t included in that vision because $$$ > women OBVIOUSLY. Thanks, capitalism!

I’ve noticed that a lot of you guys are upset about it. That’s unfortunate! I, on the other hand, have done everything I can to stem my anger, because having to truly acknowledge the fact that we’re regressing toward politics pre-1912 on top of living with daily catcalling, normalized sexual harassment, misogynist murder sprees, and an arts culture that’s exclusive and derisive to women might actually make me have an aneurysm. Instead, I’ve developed a list of best practices going forward for dealing with with misogyny, sexism, and the systematic oppression of women. Onward! Keep reading »

Guy Makes Justice Ginsberg’s Hobby Lobby Statement Into A Song

today's lady news
ginsberg song
"Oh, The Court, I Fear, Has Ventured Into A Minefield"
  • Well, that’s one way to react to the Supreme Court’s ruling today.
  • In case musical tributes to Supreme Court documents aren’t your jam, here’s a much quieter roundup of the eight best lines from Justice Ginsberg’s dissent. [Mother Jones]
  • Or there’s this one-act play inspired by the ruling, called “The Taming of the Slut.” [Happy Nice Time People]
  • Arm yourself with knowledge: 10 right-wing media myths about the Hobby Lobby case. [Media Matters For America]
  • The town of Latta, South Carolina has reinstated police chief Crystal Moore, who was fired by the town’s mayor because she is a lesbian. (Yeah, apparently that’s legal.) [Wonkette] Keep reading »

Supreme Court Rules Employers With Religious Objections Don’t Have To Cover Contraception

birth controll pills

The Supreme Court ruled today [PDF] that employers with religious objections to birth control are not required to cover contraception in health insurance plans for women under the Affordable Care Act. The court ruled 5-4 in favor of Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft stores owned by evangelical Christians who oppose birth control. The Obama administration had made a variety of concessions for religious employers like churches and religious non-profits, but this ruling affects for-profit businesses. (According to Amy Howe at SCOTUSblog, this ruling will not apply to publicly held corporations, just family-owned businesses when the owners in question are clearly religious.)

Update: Keep reading »

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Anti-Abortion Protesters In Clinic Buffer Zones Case

abortion protester

Today, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of anti-abortion protesters in a case regarding the First Amendment as it pertains to buffer zones around abortion clinics.

The state of Massachusetts had a 2007 law that forbids anti-abortion protesters from entering a 35-foot radius around the entrances of clinics, marked in yellow around the sidewalks. The law is meant to contain the intimidation, harassment and threats lobbed against staff, patients and escorts at the clinics.  McCullen vs. Coakley challenged the law, arguing that it was a violation of protesters’ free speech because the speech of those allowed inside the buffer zone was being privileged over that of those allowed outside the buffer zone.

The Supreme Court unanimously agreed, stating that in previous rulings they have not curbed speech on public sidewalks. Keep reading »

6 Things To Know About The Supreme Court’s Abortion Clinic Buffer Zone Case

abortion protester

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court is set to begin hearing arguments on the subject of abortion. But it’s not reproductive rights, per se, that the Court will be hearing about: this time it’s a matter of clinic safety.

McCullen vs. Coakley is a lawsuit against a 2007 Massachusetts law that forbids anti-abortion protesters from entering a buffer zone of 35 feet in front of the entrances and exits of clinics. Under the law, anti-abortion protesters — known for their intimidating and harassing behavior — must do all their prosthelytizing and praying from outside of a yellow line painted on the side walk, allowing clinic patients and their escorts to pass freely into and out of the facility. Protesters say this is a violation of the First Amendment.

Find out more about what the Supreme Court will be determining in McCullen vs. Coakley, after the jump: Keep reading »

Supreme Court To Take Up Hobby Lobby Birth Control Case

todays lady news
  • The case filed by Hobby Lobby, a craft store owned by Christians who don’t believe in birth control and refuses to cover it under the Affordable Care Act, is headed to the Supreme Court. In March 2014, the highest court in the land will take up the question of whether a company can refuse to cover contraception for its employees due to the religious objections of its owners. Presently, only churches and other religious non-profits can refuse to cover BC. [Huffington Post] Keep reading »

Scenes From The Supreme Courts Ruling On The Defense Of Marriage Act & Prop 8

On Wednesday morning the Supreme Court ruled to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s anti-gay marriage Prop 8. After months of waiting for a decision, gay marriage supporters can breathe a sigh of relief.

Photos from around the Supreme Court and in San Francisco’s City Hall capture the ebullient mood of gay rights supporters on hearing the decision. Click through to see how gay marriage advocates are celebrating the win.

Prop 8
All of The Frisky's Prop 8 coverage. Read More »
DOMA & Prop 8 Struck down
Supreme Court Rules Defense of Marriage Act Unconstitutional
The Supreme Court rules on gay marriage. Read More »
Chris Kluwe On Gay Rights
chris kluwe
Read the NFL player's letter in support of marriage equality! Read More »

Supreme Court Rules Defense Of Marriage Act & Prop 8 Are Unconstitutional

Gay Marriage Wins
"TIME" magazine declares that gay marriage has already won. Read More »
DOMA Struck Down
In the appeals court. Read More »
Waiting out DOMA ruling
DOMA protest
Gay marriage supporters wait out a ruling on the Supreme Court steps. Read More »
Supreme Court Rules Defense of Marriage Act Unconstitutional

In a huge victory for gay marriage supporters, the Supreme Court ruled 5-to-4 on Wednesday that the Defense of Marriage Act and Prop 8 are both unconstitutional.

According to the SCOTUS blog the judges ruled in the following fashion:

Roberts dissents. Scalia dissents. DOMA is unconstitutional as a deprivation of the equal liberty of persons that is protected by the Fifth Amendment.

According to the ruling, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito, were all in the minority.

The statute was ruled invalid, according to the Supreme Court’s blog, because:

“DOMA singles out a class of persons deemed by a State entitled ot recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty. The federal statute is invalid, for no legitimate purpose overcomes the purpose and effect to disparage and injure those whom the State, by its marriage laws, sought to protect in personhood and dignity. By seeking to displace this protection and treating those persons as living in marriages less respected than others.”;

Keep reading »

Supreme Court Takes Ax To Voting Rights Act

Supreme Court Takes Ax To Voting Rights Act

he Supreme Court dealt what looks like a mortal wound to the Voting Rights Act today, striking down the law’s key enforcement metric. The court did not, as some had expected, strike down Section 5, which gives the federal government oversight over states and localities with a history of voter discrimination. Instead, in a 5-4 decision, the court’s conservative justices ruled that the formula used to determine which places require oversight is out of date, CNN explains. (The Washington Post has a quick primer on the law’s specifics.) Read more on Newser…

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