Tag Archives: skin cancer

Irina Shayk Poses Naked For Marc Jacobs

Now you can have a gorgeous naked woman on you anytime you want: a naked Irina Shayk is on a T-shirt. The Sports Illustrated‘s swimsuit cover girl posed nude for Marc Jacobs’ “Protect The Skin You’re In” campaign with her hands over her breasts and the copy across her bum. Proceeds from the naked Irina Shayk tees will go towards the NYU Cancer Institute. Model Bar Refaeli will also appear pose nude on shirts for the cause and tweeted pics of her T — naked butt! — on Thursday. You can snag a T at any of the Marc Jacobs stores nationwide. [NY Daily News] Keep reading »

Gisele Thinks Sunscreen Is Poison

“I cannot put this poison on my skin. I do not use anything synthetic.”

– Gisele Bundchen says she refuses to use an SPF when she’s out in the sun because she believes the chemicals that block out the sun’s UV rays are toxic. Instead, she only spends time in the sun before 8 a.m. when its too weak to do any damage. The National Cancer Institute of Brazil was quick to correct the supermodel on her misinformation, by releasing a statement saying, “Sunscreen prevents damage to the skin and is of fundamental importance for the prevention of cancer. This is not any poison, when a public person makes a statement like this, it creates confusion.” I dunno about you, but I’ll continue to take my health advice from experts, not catwalkers. [Daily Mail U.K.] Keep reading »

I Have Melanoma

A couple months ago, after returning from a vacation in Puerto Rico, I noticed a little mole on my left ankle. I didn’t even realize it was a mole at first, because I don’t really have any others—I thought it was a shaving cut. But when it didn’t go away after a week or so, I took a closer look and realized it was a mole that was different colors and had irregular edges. Keep reading »

The Internet Wants To Help Save Your Skin

We know the rules: wear sunscreen, get regular checkups from the dermatologist, and watch your skin for signs of oddly shaped moles. But let’s be honest. There are days you go without sunscreen, having no insurance can make regular visits to the derm difficult, and sometimes distinguishing the difference between the shape of a mole one day versus a month later is impossible. SkinOfMine.com is here to save you from those very skin woes. Simply upload a picture of yourself or specific moles to the website, track their changes over time by uploading newer images, and — should you need it — forward the pictures to a dermatologist for further advice. You’ll be able to easily view the difference in shape and size without wondering, Did that mole grow? or Was that there before? Keep reading »

Why You Should Be Using European Sunscreen

Oh, Europe: Land of health care, sexy accents, and skinny people. Another thing they’ve got going for them that we don’t? Superior sunscreen. Apparently, many sun protection products sold in the United States only guard the skin from ultraviolet B rays (UVB). When you’re browsing lotions for a high SPF, do you actually know what that means? Here in the States, it stands for sun protection factor, which gauges a product’s effectiveness only against these UVB rays (which can be responsible for skin cancer and wrinkles), but might not tell you how well it protects the skin from UVA rays, reports The New York Times. In Europe, many sunscreens contain a UVA-blocking ingredient called Tinosorb M, which is unapproved in America. Keep reading »

The New Catch-22: Can Sunscreen Give You Skin Cancer?

Great. Just as we had stocked up on all the necessary sun protection supplies for the season, we hear this incredibly disturbing news. An environmental organization claims that “almost half of the 500 most popular sunscreen products may actually increase the speed at which malignant cells develop and spread skin cancer because they contain vitamin A or its derivatives.” The same group also concluded in a study that several of the well-known sunscreen brands out there contain “oxybenzone, a chemical shown in laboratory studies to release a reactive form of oxygen that can actually be skin-cancer contributing.”

Um, who are we supposed to believe now? If this is true, then our options are none too appealing: 1) Skip sunscreen, get burned, risk cancer, 2) Slap on the SPF 70, avoid burn, still get cancer, or 3) Become a vampire. [Vanity Fair] Keep reading »

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