Tag Archives: sexual violence

Princeton Mom Calls Rape A “Learning Experience,” Says Victims Should Just Ask Their Rapists To Leave

Princeton Mom Calls Rape A "Learning Experience," Says Victims Should Just Ask Their Rapists To Leave
Warning: This Will Make You Want To Throw Things

I’m generally in a happy mood on most Fridays, but I am on the verge of throwing my laptop at the wall this morning after watching Princeton Mom‘s latest bullshit-spewing interview about her thoughts on acquaintance rape.

Susan Patton, dubbed Princeton Mom for her degree from the esteemed University and, quite frankly, weird obsession with it, has become infamous for her “alternative” views on gender and relationship issues, including her idea that date rape isn’t real. So when CNN did a segment on campus rape yesterday, they, for some reason unbeknownst to every human in America, chose to bring on Princeton Mom as their guest. The interview was held for 10 minutes and 32 seconds, and it was 10 minutes and 32 seconds of some of the most ignorant, generalized statements I’ve ever heard in my life. Amidst her claims that she is a “sympathetic ear,” Patton managed to have this mind-numbing conversation with CNN host Carol Costello about rape on campus. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Rape Doesn’t Have To Meet The Legal Standard To Have Happened

I’m on the advice panel for I Believe You, It’s Not Your Fault, a blog where adult victims of sexual assault share their stories in the hope of helping younger girls. I do believe people, automatically, when they tell me they’ve been raped. Why wouldn’t I? When I give advice, I try to focus on what the victims can do to validate themselves, to get some stability back in their lives, to show their bodies respect, to get some perspective on the psychological effects of trauma — just like everyone else on the panel does. We don’t jump to “BURN YOUR RAPIST TO THE GROUND! DESTROY HIM!” The fate of the accused is not the point of the blog; it’s the fate of the victim that matters to us. Keep reading »

RIP Society: Study Finds That Young Girls See Sexual Violence As Normal

RIP Society: Study Finds That Young Girls See Sexual Violence As Normal

Today in Egregious Discoveries About Humanity, a study has found that a big reason women rarely report sexual violence is because they view it as “normal.” The study, which will be published in Gender & Society, reviewed forensic interviews with 100 kids who may have been sexually assaulted. The interviews were conducted by the Children’s Advocacy Center, and the subjects’ ages ranged from 3-17.

The research team found that young women and girls often saw objectification, sexual harassment and abuse to be a normal part of life. Male privilege and a sense of female powerlessness, it seems, was seen by many interviewees as typical. One 13-year-old interview subject justified the fact that boys tried to inappropriately touch her at school because “they do it to everyone.” Keep reading »

Pay Attention: #RapeCultureIsWhen…

Earlier today, Zerlina Maxwell, a feminist writer and political analyst, was inspired to start the Twitter hashtag #RapeCultureIsWhen in response to both TIME magazine and RAINN (the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network) claiming that feminists have overhyped the existence and impact of rape culture.

Last week, RAINN made their recommendations to the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault and for some reason decided to make a point of deemphasizing the impact of rape culture, writing:

In the last few years, there has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming “rape culture” for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campus. While it is helpful to point out the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important not to lose sight of a simple fact: Rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions, of a small percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime.

Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Replacing Sexism With Racism Is Not a Proper Hollaback

street harassment

This post is reprinted from The Huffington Post with the permission of its authors.

What’s the biggest myth about street harassment? That men of color comprise the majority of offenders.

It’s a myth as old as this nation: the idea that Black men are more likely to be sexual predators — especially of white women. Consider D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth Of A Nation,” that builds an entire narrative on the idea of the black brute. From the Scottsboro boys to Emmitt Till, history as well as popular culture, the justice system and virtually all other facets of American society still hold the deeply entrenched notion of Black men as people to be feared.

But the myth doesn’t stop with history. In a recent New York Times article, a White woman living in a mostly Caribbean community (Crown Heights, Brooklyn) gets physically assaulted by a Latino man and wonders if it’s her fault, as if moving into a mostly Caribbean community was the city-dwellers equivalent to “asking for it.” A few years ago, a woman, also writing for The New York Times, reported on her experience doing aid work in the Congo and hearing repeatedly from other European aid workers that sexual harassment, violence, and rape in those areas “is cultural,” instead of, as she duly notes, “a tool of war.” The myth that Black and Latino men are innately sexually aggressive is one that extends beyond our national borders. Keep reading »

Massachusetts Judge Rules It’s Legal To Take Photos Up Women’s Skirts

TLN upskirt photography
  • Good news, creeps and perverts: yesterday, a judge in Massachusetts ruled that it is legal to photograph or film underneath a woman’s skirt. The judge ruled that women don’t have the reasonable expectation not to have their vagina filmed without their consent in public, as “peeping tom” laws only apply to private dressing rooms and bathrooms.  [Think Progress]
  • Look at how this female pilot brilliantly responded to a note left for her by a male passenger after her flight. [Her.ie] Keep reading »
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