Tag Archives: seventeen

Tavi Is Meh About “Seventeen”‘s No Photoshop Pledge

Julie Meets Tavi
Julie Gerstein fan-girled out when she met Tavi at Fashion Week. Read More »
Tavi On Lana
Tavi Gevinson proves she's incredibly wise beyond her years. Read More »
Will Tavi write a book?
Tavi Gevinson may write a book about... being Tavi Gevinson. Read More »

“I think it’s great that these girls are taking action. I don’t know, however, that Photoshop makes a huge difference with the kind of models they use, or that there aren’t other parts of the magazine that contribute to the same issue. I’m sure most people don’t think as obsessively about stuff like the wording of a headline as I do, but the effects of headlines under the “health” section about your back-to-school body are still there. It took me a little bit once middle school started to realize that if I didn’t read Seventeen, I didn’t feel obligated to watch what I eat. Language is powerful, along with photos. …  [T]t’s not just about Photoshop — all kinds of components of a magazine help contribute to the feelings that might leave a reader with a negative body image.”

– Racked called up Tavi Gevinson of Rookie Mag to chat about Seventeen and how the mag’s website has seemingly stole Rookie’s “Ask A Grown Man” idea with a not-even-trying-to-be-different feature, “Ask An A-Lister.” Tavi ended up talking about Seventeen‘s recent pledge, following a petition with 84,000 signatures, to stop using Photoshop. (Teen Vogue followed suit soon after.) I’m somewhat less cynical than Tavi about Seventeen‘s Body Peace Treaty, but I also think she makes a fantastic point that images are only part of the problem. Language matters, too, and the way that magazines and other media outlets tell stories pertaining to women/girls and body image are equally important. Elsewhere in the interview Tavi says, “ Sometimes [Seventeen's] ‘embarrassing’ stories are literally about boys finding out that you have your period. I’m just tired of stigmatizing totally normal body stuff like that, which is already a little scary and weird to some girls.” Co-sign times 1000! [Racked]

First Seventeen, Now Teen Vogue, Next The World?

Julia's Seventeen Petition
Teen activist asks Seventeen to print unaltered photos. Read More »
Models Sans Airbrushing
See what these beautiful girls really look like! Read More »
Relationships & Body Image
How does your love life affect your body image? Read More »

Earlier this week, Seventeen magazine, on the urging of thousands of readers, pledged to stop airbrushing and Photoshopping the girls in its pages. The move was in part due to the work of 14-year-old high-schooler Julia Bluhm, who launched a petition encouraging the mag to show what girls really look like. Keep reading »

“Seventeen” Promises To Stop Photoshopping Models

Today's Lady News photo
  • In response to a Change.org petition, Seventeen magazine has said it will no longer alter the body size or face shape of the models posing in its magazine. The petition was created by Julia Bluhm of Waterville, Maine, and garnered over 84,000 signatures which were hand-delivered to the executive editor of Seventeen. [Change.org/Seventeen]
  • North Carolina’s Republican-controlled state legislature has overrode a veto by Governor Bev Perdue, effectively defunding the state’s Planned Parenthood clinics. State funding is not used for abortion services, so the defunding will only be hurting those who go to Planned Parenthood clinics for other services, like Pap smears and cancer screenings.  [Huffington Post]
  • The FDA has approved the first quick, over-the-counter HIV test. OraQuick uses a mouth swap and can tell your HIV status in less than 40 minutes. [AP] Keep reading »

Teen Activist Julia Bluhm Is Still Fighting Against Photoshop

Julia's Seventeen Petition
Teen activist asks Seventeen to print unaltered photos. Read More »
Open Letter To Seventeen
Blogger Tavi takes the mag to task over an ugly cover line. Read More »

A couple weeks ago we told you about an amazing 14-year-old activist named Julia Bluhm who wrote a petition to Seventeen magazine asking them to publish one unaltered photo spread every month. Well, since then Julia’s been busy. Her petition has garnered over 74,000 signatures (yep, you read that right: 74,000), she scored a profile in The New York Times, and she recently held a mock photo shoot outside the Seventeen offices (that’s her in the middle)… Keep reading »

Teen Activist Asks Seventeen Magazine To Skip The Photoshop

Models Sans Airbrushing
See what these beautiful girls really look like! Read More »
"No Airbrushing" Policy
Faith Hill Redbook Photoshop photo
Why a "no airbrushing" policy is good, but not good enough. Read More »
Open Letter To Seventeen
Blogger Tavi takes the mag to task over an ugly cover line. Read More »

Julia Bluhm, a 14-year-old from Waterville, Maine, was hearing a lot of negative self-talk in her ballet class. Her peers often complained about feeling fat and exhibited signs of warped body image. “To girls today, the word ‘pretty’ means skinny and blemish-free,” says Julia. “Why is that, when so few girls actually fit into such a narrow category? It’s because the media tells us that ‘pretty’ girls are impossibly thin with perfect skin.” Fed up with such unattainable standards, Julia decided it was time to act. So she wrote a petition to the editorial board of Seventeen magazine, with one simple request… Keep reading »

Tavi’s Open Letter To Seventeen Magazine Over Its “Fat & Ugly” Cover Line

Prodigious pint-sized blogger Tavi has lept on the Seventeen magazine bashing bandwagon. And for good reason: The 13-year-old penned an open letter to Seventeen on her blog, The Style Rookie, over a downright evil cover line on its June/July 2010 issue, “The Party Drug That Can Make You Fat & Ugly.” Fat and ugly? Yeah, Seventeen went there.

Keep reading »

What’s So Special About Being 17?

I just turned 21, and to me that is the climax of birthday celebrations. I am now legally allowed to do almost anything in the United States—except rent a car, for some reason. The landmarks and rites of passage of adolescence have all been crossed out and I am now in the bright, glaring headlights of adulthood. And that is scary. As I look back at the past 20 years, I remember all the major life events: Disney World, learning to ride a bike, first kiss, prom, high school spring break, welcome week of college. I have waved my arms above my head and gone “Woooooo!” through all of these essential life events, and now I am left with my hands in my pockets wondering what to do next. Like many people I find the best way to deal is to procrastinate, and one easy way to do this is to just dote on the past and obsess over what part of life I would like to go back to. For some reason, I keep going back to junior year of high school, when I was 17. And I don’t seem to be the only one. Keep reading »

Quote Of The Day: America Ferrera Talks Smack About Gossip Girl

“Close, genuine female relationships are not what generally gets depicted in movies and TV shows. Like, if you’re watching The Hills or 90210, all the backstabbing shapes the way we act – you go to school, and you think your job is to find a sworn enemy and be jealous of each other. I mean, I love Blake [Lively]; she’s a wonderful friend of mine, but shows like Gossip Girl kind of condition us to be mean.” — America Ferrara in Seventeen Keep reading »

Quote Of The Day: Blake Lively Doesn’t See The Paris Hilton Similarities

“I once heard someone say that I’m similar to Paris Hilton – since I have a dog and blonde hair, that must mean we’re alike. It’s a dumb thing to say. I don’t think that makes Paris and me similar … I don’t go to clubs, I don’t party, I don’t dance on tables, and I don’t like sex tapes.” — Blake Lively in the August issue of Seventeen
Keep reading »

Bigger Would Be Better On America’s Next Top Model

We have some news for Tyra Banks — a size eight dress isn’t plus size and America’s Next Top Model winner Whitney Thompson ain’t no fat girl charity case. The new “plus sized” model is on the cover of the June issue of Seventeen, sending the message to America’s highest risk group for eating disorders that a perfectly fit size eight means you’re a big girl. Adolescents already have enough body issues without a thin girl getting called thick. This is some major mean-girl fashionista bull crap. If you’re gonna give us a plus-size superstar, she better be big enough to play the part. [Bitten & Bound] Keep reading »

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