Tag Archives: science

Meet Your New Favorite Dinosaur: The Pygmy T-Rex!

The Tyrannosaurus Rex is the most popular dinosaur for good reason: it was huge, ferocious, had comically tiny arms, and ate a lawyer off a toilet (LOL) in “Jurassic Park.” What’s not to love? But what if I told you that paleontologists in Alaska just discovered a new relative of T-Rex that they’ve dubbed “Pygmy T-Rex”? That would instantly be your new favorite dinosaur, right? Nanuqsaurus hoglundi is the (much less catchy) official name for this newly discovered creature, which was half as big as a full-sized T-Rex and roamed the arctic 70 million years ago. As much as I wish Pygmy T-Rex was the size of, say, a chihuahua, Nanuqsaurus was actually a huge, terrifying beast: 25 feet long, with sharp teeth and a taste for meat (no word on if it shares its larger cousin’s craving for lawyers). Still, any fearsome dinosaur with “pygmy” in its name is automatically qualified as “adorable” in my eyes. [Discover]

Great News For Floor Food Enthusiasts: Scientists Say The 5-Second Rule Might Actually Be True

The 5-second rule has been providing a comforting layer of germ security to anyone who doesn’t mind picking dustbunnies off their peanut butter toast for generations. While the theory has generally been dismissed by mature adults and the lamestream media (sorry, I’ve just always wanted an excuse to type, “lamestream media”), a new study suggests the 5-second rule might actually be backed up by real science. Well, kinda. A group of researchers at Aston University in Birmingham, England conducted a study to see how germs like E.Coli and Staphylococcus transfer from floor surfaces to food. They found that picking your food up right away may help thwart contamination, as “time is a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a piece of food.” While the researchers were careful to clarify that it really always depends on what type of bacteria are lurking on the floor at any given time, this is still heartening news for floor toast enthusiasts. No word on whether “dibs!” and “shotgun!” are any closer to becoming legally binding verbal contracts, but hey, anything’s possible. [Neatorama]

Mommie Dearest: Are We Ready To Design Our Babies In A Lab?

laboratory

I can still remember some of the quieter moments of my pregnancy: laying on the couch, my fingers trailing over my ever-expanding belly, wondering about the baby inside and if everything would be okay. During our first ultrasound appointment around 20 weeks, the tech had been concerned about the size of the baby’s kidneys and some fluid that surrounded them. He pointed it out to me on the screen, and later on the printed pictures we were given to take home. To me, the blurry image looked no more like a baby than a Rorschach inkblot test, but I so desperately tried to see what the tech saw. In the weeks that followed my anxiety shot through the roof. Was this a random anomaly? Was it something I did? Was it something I could have prevented? Keep reading »

Study Says You Have Only 4 Emotions

girl-with-strong-emotion

Scientists have traditionally held that people have six basic emotions: happy, sad, angry, surprised, afraid, and disgusted. But a new study reduces that number to just four by combining “angry” with “disgusted” and “surprised” with “afraid.” Read more on Newser…

Be My Boyfriend: Bill Nye The Science Guy To Debate Founder Of The Creation Museum

One thing I always say about men: it is so hot when they believe that the Earth is 4.5 billion years old. That’s why the rest of The Frisky staff and I want to have front row seats next month when Bill Nye The Science Guy debates Ken Ham, the founder of the Creation Museum.  Keep reading »

Glow-In-The-Dark Piglets Created In China Using Jellyfish DNA

Glow-In-The-Dark Piglets Created In China Using Jellyfish DNA

Just in time for Christmas, a team of scientists in China were able to create 10 little piglets that glow green under black fluorescent lights, thanks to a technique developed by the University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Medicine.

Scientists, however, are not creating glowing farm animals for seasonal décor. The goal of the research is to have an efficient and cheap way of getting a beneficial gene into humans that could help treat many genetic disorders. Read more on Huffington Post …

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