Tag Archives: science

Please Yield To The Space Shuttle

This weekend, the streets of Los Angeles were graced with a sight much more spectacular than the usual gridlock as the Space Shuttle Endeavor was moved to its new home at the California Science Center. As breathtaking as it is to see a space shuttle rounding a corner next to a Sizzler, my palms are sweating on behalf of whoever had to steer that thing. Seriously, look at the tiny amount of clearance between the wings and those light poles! So stressful. Check out more amazing shots of the move over at NASA’s Flickr page. [NASA]

NASA's Mohawk Guy
He's hot. He's brilliant. We're in love. Read More »
Good Morning From Mars
The Curiosity has landed. Read More »

Be My Pet: Fanged Dwarf Porcupine Dinosaur

Ice Age Flower
Scientists resurrect a 30,000-year-old plant. Read More »

Ladies and gentlemen, meet Pegomastax africanus, a newly discovered dinosaur about the size of a house cat, with self-sharpening fangs and porcupine-like quills. It looks vicious, but scientists believe Pego (that’s its nickname from now on, OK?) was an herbivore who used those fearsome teeth for nothing more than foraging yummy plants and defending its adorable little self. Another bombshell? Paul Sereno, a paleontologist at the University of Chicago, insists that if this long-extinct creature were still around today, “it would be a nice pet—if you could train it not to nip you.” Well fancy that. I’ve been wanting to get a Pomeranian, but suddenly I want a Pegomastax instead. Amelia, would you and Lucca care to join us for a walk? [National Geographic]

“Edit-a-thon” On Wikipedia Targets Crappy Entries About Women In Science

Today's Lady News photo
  • The Royal Society, a prestigious science group in the UK, will host a Wikipedia “edit-a-thon” on October 19 and encourages smart peeps to contribute to Wiki pages about women in the sciences. A Royal Society Fellow proposed the idea after learning that the average person who edits Wikipedia is a 26-year-old man. [Daily Dot]
  • A foundation has purchased the Wichita, Kansas, building in which Dr. George Tiller — who as murdered by an anti-abortion extremist in May 2009 — provided abortions. The Trust Women Foundation says it plans to re-establish abortion providers within the clinic. The clinic has been closed since June 2009 following the murder. [Kansas.com]
  • Out lesbian Nena Cook is running for the Oregon Supreme Court. (That means you should read this story, Winona and other Portland-ers!) [Just Out] Keep reading »

Women In Science Screwed By Sexism

Today's Lady News photo
  • Men applying to science positions at research universities were deemed more competent than women applicants, according to a new study. Or as blogger Kay Steiger put it, “Science documents discrimination against women in science.” I know we have a bunch of Frisky readers who’ve studied or are currently studying science. Care to weigh in with your thoughts in the comments? [Inside Higher Ed, Kay Steiger] Keep reading »

As You Can See, We’re All Made Of Stars

Good Morning From Mars
The Curiosity has landed. Read More »
Star Trek Ring
Say "You're my Number One" with this insignia ring. Read More »
Candy Physics?!
It's our new favorite branch of science. Read More »

When astrophysicist Carl Sagan said, “We’re made of star stuff,” he was speaking about the fact that human beings are quite literally composed of elements that were forged within the cores of stars that went supernova. “Some part of our being knows this is where we came from,” he posited, “because the cosmos is also within us.” Photographer Ignacio Torres wanted to illustrate this amazing concept, so he used glitter, dust, and dramatic lighting to produce a series of photos like this one, which “suggest [a] celestial creation.” Check out more of his stunning images, presented in GIF form, on his website. [Scientific American]

Candy Physics Is My New Favorite Branch Of Science

Candy Corn Oreos
Yes, they exist. Yes, we want to eat them. Read More »

Finally a team of physicists has devoted the proper time and effort to answering the age old question, “Is it better to bite into a round piece of candy, or continually suck on it?” In a paper poetically titled, “Sticky physics of joy: On the dissolution of spherical candies,” researchers from the University of Graz in Austria described the results of an experiment in which they placed spherical candies in a water bath made to replicate the pH levels and movement of a human mouth and observed the way they dissolved over time. The researchers expected the candy to vanish exponentially, but their findings indicated that the candies dissolved at a constant linear rate instead. What does this mean for candy enthusiasts? Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular