Tag Archives: science

Bill Nye Explains Evolution With Emojis

Dancing Twins = Reproduction? I Guess I Can Roll With It

Bill Nye has been on an evolution-education kick lately. First, last week, he went on Newsmax’s “MidPoint” to talk about his vehement opposition to creationism being taught in public schools, or at all, to young children. When asked if creationism is making kids less intelligent, he responded:

“Absolutely. They’re holding the kids back. These kids will not be able to participate in the future. Because they will not have this fundamental idea that you can use skeptical thought to learn about nature. They will have to suppress everything they see in nature in order to try and get a worldview that’s compatible with the adults, in whom they trust.”

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This Is What Happens When You Saw A Rubber Band Ball In Half

This Is What Happens When You Saw A Rubber Band Ball In Half
Why Do I Have Chills?

I don’t know what I expected to happen when a rubber band ball is sawed in half, but I certainly did not anticipate feeling a mixture of delight, fear and revulsion. Like, I am oddly terrified of, grossed out by and dying to touch whatever is happening on my screen right now. [IFL Science!]

A Woman Misidentified As UVA’s Jackie Is Taking Legal Action Against Chuck Johnson

  • A woman identified by (Living Piece Of Poop) Chuck Johnson as UVA’s Jackie isn’t Jackie, and is pressing charges. (Jezebel)
  • Bill Cosby Defender Whoopi Goldberg interviewed Bill Cosby Victim Beverly Johnson, and it was as ridiculous as you’d imagine on Whoopi’s part. (Death and Taxes)
  • Another horrifying story about a lack of justice for rape victims on university campuses has come out of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. (VICE Sports)
  • Female researchers at universities are at as much of a risk as the rest of the female population of being raped, especially by their supervisors. (Atlantic) Keep reading »

Life Dream Status: Bill Nye & Jessica Williams Will Help Us Explore Science

Science
SCIENCE! Heck Yeah!

GE’s #EmojiScience campaign, which launched today conducting experiments in NYU’s science labs, provides a divine outlet for we non-Ph.D. folk who stew over burning scientific questions while wishing we had an astrophysicist on speed dial. Over the next two days, stars like Bill Nye, Jessica Williams of “The Daily Show,” Gary Vaynerchu and Baratunde Thurston will help GE scientists run emoji-inspired experiments and prove that, in the words of GE, ”there’s science in everything, including emojis.” Those of us who are casual “Cosmos” viewers, “Interstellar” head-scratchers or just have a tendency to get lost in science-related Wikipedia k-holes can join the party by sending a SnapChat of our favorite emoji to “GeneralElectric” from 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. today, tomorrow and Friday. SnapChatters will receive a video of a live science experiment that fits their emoji of choice (personally, this one has my vote) conducted by a GE scientist or one of the aforementioned celebrity guests. Science: it’s fun! It’s hip!

Science ‘N’ Stuff: 10 Very Important & No Doubt Stupid Questions I Have About Our Mirror Universe

Science 'N' Stuff: 10 Very Important & No Doubt Stupid Questions I Have About Our Mirror Universe

Are you ready for your minds to be BLOWN? Via PBS and Scientific American, a new theory contends that when the Big Bang occurred and the universe expanded, it did so in two directions not just one, creating a mirror universe on the other side of the Big Bang. Except instead of time moving forward as it does in our universe, time in the mirror universe moves backward.

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(It’s okay to take a break from reading at this point to lay your head down for a second. I know this is hard to comprehend.) Keep reading »

Black Women Are More Confident About Entering STEM Fields

A new American Psychology Association study shows that while STEM is associated with masculinity cross-culturally, black women associate STEM with men less than white women do. The study mentions that African American women also study STEM majors more frequently than white women.

The stereotypes women — as well as men, as well as teachers, professors, and employers — hold about science and masculinity has a chilling effect on women’s participation in STEM majors and careers. However, black women appear to be more confident about approaching science and mathematics, possibly because the character traits associated with the fields – like independence and assertiveness — “may not be considered unfeminine” in African American cultures. Keep reading »

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