Tag Archives: romantic comedies

Seeing Your Partner As Your “Other Half” Might Doom Your Relationship

Couple

A new study in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology has found that relationships, much like most things in life, are all about perspective. When you see love as a beautiful journey of growth and occasional struggle, your love life is more likely to prosper. When you want your relationship to be perfect or believe you have one and only soul mate to “complete” you, you’re likely to have a tough time sustaining happiness in love. Luckily, improving that kind of emotional rut is as easy as a simple shift in perspective. The study divides views on love into two “frames” — a union between two halves who are made for each other, or a journey with ups and downs. To better explain the unity concept, the research team linked it to an Aristotle quote: “Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.” People who see love like a journey, on the other hand, are more likely to relate to traditional wedding vows that promise to love one another for better or for worse. Keep reading »

23 Romantic Movies Revised for Honesty

As we recently discussed, romantic movies are as bad for your brain as just about any type of movie you can watch as a stupid young person. We asked you to show us what they might look like if they actually told the truth. Read more…

What Would’ve Happened If These Rom-Com Heroines Had Chosen Themselves Instead Of Prince Charming

Having been a fan of ”Breaking Upwards,” the heartbreaking debut film from co-writers/co-stars/cohabitators Daryl Wein and Zoe Lister-Jones, I couldn’t wait to see the couple’s follow up, ”Lola Versus.” Starring mumblecore goddess Greta Gerwig, ”Lola Versus” tells the story of a woman on the verge of 30 who’s left understandibly devastated after her fiance dumps her three weeks before the wedding. However, after salty food and casual sex doesn’t help fill the void, she must figure out how to move on with her life without sliding back into the arms of her self-centered ex.

In rom-coms such as this, it’s easy to pin the leading lady’s happiness on whether or not she ends up with a guy at the end of the film, which got me thinking: What if some of our most adored romantic comedies had ended up with different outcomes? More specifically, what would’ve happened if these “meet cute”-ies didn’t opt for the embrace of Prince Charming? From Vivian Ward in ”Pretty Woman” to Jamie Rellis in ”Friends With Benefits,” let’s spitball about what would’ve happened after the credits rolled if these leading ladies had chosen themselves over whatever handsome—but probably jerky—suitor.

Leslie Simon is the author of Geek Girls Unite: How Fangirls, Bookworms, Indie Chicks and Other Misfits Are Taking Over the World. Follow her musings on her blog and on Twitter.

One Guy, Every Rom-Com Star Ever

All Hail Rom Coms!
Mindy Kaling
Mindy Kaling defends this disrespected genre. Read More »
Whitney Talks Comedy
Whitney Cummings on why it's okay for a woman to be pretty in comedy. Read More »
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What does every single dude that’s ever starred in a romantic comedy have in common? Well, they’ve all been impersonated by this guy, and they’ve all been in a movie with Jen Aniston.

Mindy Kaling Defends Romantic Comedies

Mindy Kaling

“I feel almost embarrassed revealing this, because the genre has been so degraded in the past twenty years that saying you like romantic comedies is essentially an admission of mild stupidity. But that has not stopped me from enjoying them. I like watching people fall in love onscreen so much that I can suspend my disbelief in the contrived situations that occur only in the heightened world of romantic comedies. I have come to enjoy the moment when the male lead, say, slips and falls right on top of the expensive wedding cake. I actually feel robbed when the female lead’s dress doesn’t get torn open at a baseball game while the JumboTron camera is on her. I regard romantic comedies as a subgenre of sci-fi, in which the world operates according to different rules than my regular human world.”

Mindy Kaling of “The Office” confesses in the new issue of The New Yorker that she is a closet romantic comedy junkie and dreams of writing one some day. She goes on to break down the archetypes of the rom-com: the Klutz, the Ethereal Weirdo, the Woman Who Is Obsessed with Her Career and Is No Fun at All. Thanks to Mindy for defending this genre. Because when you’re feeling down on a Sunday night, nothing can cheer you up faster than cooking a good meal and watching a terrible rom-com. [New Yorker]

“Work-Coms”: They’re Rom-Coms, Only Light On The Romance

The discerning female film viewer has long trained herself to separate rom-coms from reality when it comes to her love life. He’s probably not going to win you over with a grand romantic gesture, he’s probably not going to beat up some loser just to impress you, and he’s probably not going to have Matthew McConaughey’s abs. But that’s why we watch those flicks, isn’t it? It’s like porn for women’s emotions — or at the very least, something light and fluffy to entertain you when you’re lying at home on a Saturday night with cramps.

Romantic comedies about romance will always be made. Hey, something’s got to keep Jennifer Aniston working. However, in recent years, a new breed of romantic comedies has come around: work-comedies. Instead of McConaughey’s abs, we’re lusting after the woman on the big screen with the great hubby, the cute kids, and the important job. Keep reading »

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