Tag Archives: reading

Meet Catherine Wolters, The Real-Life Alex Vause From “Orange Is The New Black”

vf-catherine-cleary-wolters

If you read Piper Kerman’s memoir Orange Is The New Black or binge-watched the Netflix adaptation (and who hasn’t done that?), chances are you have wondered about the real-life woman behind Nora (in the book) and Alex Vause (the character in the show). For the first time ever, 51-year-old novelist and PhD student Catherine Cleary Wolters has spoken to Vanity Fair about her relationship with Kerman, their mutually-assured-destruction as cash smugglers for an African drug lord, and her side of their love story. Keep reading »

Donna Tartt Wins 2014 Pulitzer Prize For The Goldfinch

donna tartt
  • Donna Tartt’s novel The Goldfinch — a favorite in The Frisky’s office — is the 2014 winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. All the more reason to read it, I suppose. [Los Angeles Times]
  • A lesbian couple have wed in the UK’s first same-sex nuptials in a church. [Guardian UK]
  • Frisky reader Billieanne is working on this great new Tumblr project called “I Will End Sexual Violence,” in which people can submit pictures of themselves holding a sign explaining what they’re going to do to end sexual violence. Give it some love, why don’t you? [I Will End Sexual Violence] Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Speak Author Laurie Halse Anderson On RAINN, Rape Culture & Consent

laurie halse anderson

Every year, April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, when many of us participate in Take Back The Night speak-outs and marches to raise awareness about sexual violence in our communities. This year, the beloved young adult novelist Laurie Halse Anderson has thrown her support behind a fundraiser for the Rape Abuse And Incest National Network (RAINN), one of the main resources in our country for survivors of sexual violence.

Anderson is the author of Speak, a YA novel about 16-year-old Melinda Sordino, who is raped by a classmate at a house party the summer before 9th grade. Melinda calls 911, and the police break up the party, but she runs before she can tell anyone about the assault. When school begins, Melinda is shunned by her former friends for getting kids in trouble. Eventually, she stops talking almost entirely, grows isolated from her parents and tanks her schoolwork.

But Melinda is also mentored by a fellow outcast, an art teacher. She is able to name what happened to her and find her voice again. Published in 1999 and sadly still relevant in post-Steubenville, Speak explores the post-traumatic stress disorder that survivors suffer after an assault, but also the social ostracization of victims of sexual violence instead of perpetrators.

Throughout April, donations for RAINN will be matched dollar-for-dollar by Speak‘s publisher, Macmillan, in honor of the book’s 15th birthday. I called Laurie Halse Anderson this week and we spoke about the success of her best-selling book, teaching consent to teens, and recent controversial statements made by the president of RAINN about how “rape culture” doesn’t exist. Our conversation begins, after the jump!

Keep reading »

Are We Really Surprised That James Franco Has No Space On His Bookshelf For Women Writers?

What Your Bookshelf Says
Ever wondered what your bookshelf says about you? Read More »

James Franco, in addition to being an actor, performance artist, director and avid Instagrammer, is a writer of both fiction and poetry. He’s a big reader too — he’s currently starring on Broadway in “Of Mice and Men” — and one of his many upcoming projects includes a film adaptation of William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. In a recent interview with Shelf Awareness, Franco discussed some of the writers from contemporary literature who’ve influenced and had an impact on him, both as a writer and as a person. David Foster Wallace! Cormac McCarthy! Great writers indeed. But of the writers discussed in the interview — including Franco’s Top 11 list of all time faves — not a single one was a woman. (Wait, I lied. Asked to name a book he bought based on the cover alone, Franco offered up Madonna’s Sex. So yeah, let’s not count that one.)

I would sigh, but I am not the slightest bit surprised. Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Great Author Sara Benincasa Talks Young Adult Fiction, Zelda Fitzgerald & Women In Comedy

Frisky Q&A: Great Author Sara Benincasa

A show of hands: who had to read The Great Gatsby in school?

Most of us, right? You’re probably overly familiar with the tale of Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan, if not from high school English class then from the Baz Luhrman spectacle in theaters this past summer. I hope you still have room in your stomach for more, because there’s a new Gatsby tale in town: Great, by Sara Benincasa, a young adult novel retelling of the classic.

But Great isn’t just any old retelling: the star-crossed lovers in this story are a same-sex couple set in the modern-day Hamptons. Jacinta is an “It girl” blogger who lives next door to Naomi, our narrator. While she rides out the summer at her mother’s extravagant summer home, Naomi tries to piece together Jacinta’s love affair with Delilah, a family friend of her mom and the Daisy Buchanan character in the story. It’s a familiar tale, but a completely different take on modern sexual mores and class.

And Sara Benincasa isn’t just any writer, either. She’s also one of my dearest friends. We met about seven years ago when she was a New York City-based standup comic and hosted a “Gossip Girl” fan festival. (Dorota came. It was amazing.) Over the years, I’ve watched Sara’s writing and comedy career skyrocket to much-deserved success. I’m genuinely thrilled for her that Great is such a good book and that more books from Sara are coming down the pipeline soon.

I called Sara up over Skype last week to chat about F. Scott Fitzgerald, feminism and how her memoir is being made into a TV show (!!!) by Diablo Cody. Here’s our conversation, after the jump:

Keep reading »

Happy 86th Birthday, Maya Angelou!

maya-angelou
Lookin' Good At 86

Today is the 86th birthday of one of the most beloved writers of our generation, Maya Angelou!  The Wake Forest University professor is perhaps most famous for her 1969 memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, as well as reading a poem at President Bill Clinton’s first inauguration, winning the Pulitzer Prize for one of her poetry collections, and a nomination for an Emmy for her work on the TV series “Roots.” Oh, and let’s not forget the Presidential Medal Of Freedom! Angelou is a lifelong civil rights activist, a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, and was the first-ever Black female cable car conductor in San Francisco. She was friends with Martin Luther King, Jr., Coretta Scott King and James Baldwin and these days is friends with none other than Oprah Winfrey. In memory of her birthday, I poked around YouTube looking for a good video of Angelou reading one of her poems, but I settled on this snippet from “Oprah’s Master Class.” It’s a short, lovely meditation on being human and a reminder why Maya Angelou is a national treasure. [Biography.com, YouTube]

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