Tag Archives: reading

An Excerpt From Save The Date: The Occasional Mortifications Of A Serial Wedding Guest

He showed up at my door wearing jeans. They were black, but they were definitely denim. Oh, dear. He looked so proud of himself, like, weren’t black jeans pretty much exactly the same thing as a suit? Jeans could be wedding-appropriate, come on! Well, no, not exactly. But if I said they couldn’t be, not for this wedding and probably not for most, I feared he’d only get angry and start railing on the bourgeois perceptions and expectations of my nouveau riche friends. He had on a jacket, at least, and a pressed button-down shirt. He’d shaved. He looked stressed, not angry yet, but on edge and ready to rage at being found fault with over something that he hadn’t cared about doing in the first place. This was my deal, not his.

“You look great!” I said. Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Melanie Notkin, Author Of The Otherhood, On Women Who Want Children But Don’t Have Them Yet

melanie notkin otherhood

The Otherhood: a growing population of educated, professional women in their 30s and 40s who have yet to find love or start a family. In fact, statistics show that almost 50 percent of American women are childless — yet our society still isn’t quite sure how to treat these women, placing all sorts of assumptions and opinions on them without truly understanding their decisions.

Enter Melanie Notkin, the successful founder of Savvy Auntie and a vocal representation of this demographic. Melanie’s new book, Otherhood: Modern Women Finding A New Kind Of Happiness, is part memoir and part reflection, digging deep into world of these women and the challenges they face. Keep reading »

Meet Catherine Wolters, The Real-Life Alex Vause From “Orange Is The New Black”

vf-catherine-cleary-wolters

If you read Piper Kerman’s memoir Orange Is The New Black or binge-watched the Netflix adaptation (and who hasn’t done that?), chances are you have wondered about the real-life woman behind Nora (in the book) and Alex Vause (the character in the show). For the first time ever, 51-year-old novelist and PhD student Catherine Cleary Wolters has spoken to Vanity Fair about her relationship with Kerman, their mutually-assured-destruction as cash smugglers for an African drug lord, and her side of their love story. Keep reading »

Donna Tartt Wins 2014 Pulitzer Prize For The Goldfinch

donna tartt
  • Donna Tartt’s novel The Goldfinch — a favorite in The Frisky’s office — is the 2014 winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. All the more reason to read it, I suppose. [Los Angeles Times]
  • A lesbian couple have wed in the UK’s first same-sex nuptials in a church. [Guardian UK]
  • Frisky reader Billieanne is working on this great new Tumblr project called “I Will End Sexual Violence,” in which people can submit pictures of themselves holding a sign explaining what they’re going to do to end sexual violence. Give it some love, why don’t you? [I Will End Sexual Violence] Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Speak Author Laurie Halse Anderson On RAINN, Rape Culture & Consent

laurie halse anderson

Every year, April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, when many of us participate in Take Back The Night speak-outs and marches to raise awareness about sexual violence in our communities. This year, the beloved young adult novelist Laurie Halse Anderson has thrown her support behind a fundraiser for the Rape Abuse And Incest National Network (RAINN), one of the main resources in our country for survivors of sexual violence.

Anderson is the author of Speak, a YA novel about 16-year-old Melinda Sordino, who is raped by a classmate at a house party the summer before 9th grade. Melinda calls 911, and the police break up the party, but she runs before she can tell anyone about the assault. When school begins, Melinda is shunned by her former friends for getting kids in trouble. Eventually, she stops talking almost entirely, grows isolated from her parents and tanks her schoolwork.

But Melinda is also mentored by a fellow outcast, an art teacher. She is able to name what happened to her and find her voice again. Published in 1999 and sadly still relevant in post-Steubenville, Speak explores the post-traumatic stress disorder that survivors suffer after an assault, but also the social ostracization of victims of sexual violence instead of perpetrators.

Throughout April, donations for RAINN will be matched dollar-for-dollar by Speak‘s publisher, Macmillan, in honor of the book’s 15th birthday. I called Laurie Halse Anderson this week and we spoke about the success of her best-selling book, teaching consent to teens, and recent controversial statements made by the president of RAINN about how “rape culture” doesn’t exist. Our conversation begins, after the jump!

Keep reading »

Are We Really Surprised That James Franco Has No Space On His Bookshelf For Women Writers?

What Your Bookshelf Says
Ever wondered what your bookshelf says about you? Read More »

James Franco, in addition to being an actor, performance artist, director and avid Instagrammer, is a writer of both fiction and poetry. He’s a big reader too — he’s currently starring on Broadway in “Of Mice and Men” — and one of his many upcoming projects includes a film adaptation of William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury. In a recent interview with Shelf Awareness, Franco discussed some of the writers from contemporary literature who’ve influenced and had an impact on him, both as a writer and as a person. David Foster Wallace! Cormac McCarthy! Great writers indeed. But of the writers discussed in the interview — including Franco’s Top 11 list of all time faves — not a single one was a woman. (Wait, I lied. Asked to name a book he bought based on the cover alone, Franco offered up Madonna’s Sex. So yeah, let’s not count that one.)

I would sigh, but I am not the slightest bit surprised. Keep reading »

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