Tag Archives: reading

True Story: My Memoir Pissed Off A Male Book Reviewer

8 Misleading Book Covers
bad-book-covers
Eight hilariously misleading covers slapped on classic books. Read More »
We Need Diverse Books
SB girl reading
On Black nerds, escapism, and why we need more diverse books. Read More »
book-review

When I started writing my memoir, Good Chinese Wife: A Love Affair With China Gone Wrong, I began networking with authors who wrote books set in Asia. I imagined developing solid friendships with a group of supportive authors. There’s a Chinese saying, huxiang bangzhu. It means “mutually helping one another.” That’s what I pictured.

Fast-forward six years. My memoir was being published and I arranged for review copies to be sent to authors I’ve gotten to know through social networking or in person. I knew I couldn’t expect rave reviews just because we have a connection or because I had given their books five stars on Amazon and Goodreads. But for the most part, I had been extremely pleased with the feedback.

Well, except for this one guy. Keep reading »

J.K. Rowling Has Published A New Story Checking In With 34-Year-Old Harry Potter

  • That collective shriek you hear are millenials freaking out over the new Harry Potter short story that J.K. Rowling posted on her Pottermore website today. The new story, written in the form of a gossip column, checks in with a 34-year-old graying, married Harry and his friends from Hogwarts at the Quidditch World Cup. You can read the story exclusively on Today.com! [TODAY]
  • Didn’t see that one coming: Taylor Swift penned an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal about why we should pay for music. [WSJ]
  • Even George Clooney has got mother-in-law issues: Baria Alamuddin, the mom of his gorgeous lawyer fiancée Amal Alamuddin, wants her to daughter marry a nice Lebanese boy instead. [Daily Mail UK]
  • Add Katie Holmes to the list of celebs posing topless with only their hands covering the girls. [US Weekly]

Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Black Nerds, Escapism, & Why We Need More Diverse Books

SB girl reading

“You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all.” — Junot Díaz

As a kid, I never tried to sneak out of the house. It’s not that I was a stickler for the rules (sorry, Mom) — it’s just that all the wonders I could ever want to explore didn’t exist outside the confines of my home. They were waiting for me when I woke up each morning, tucked neatly into the hallway bookshelves whose ever-expanding ranks housed J.K. Rowling, Leo Tolstoy, Judy Blume, and Sarah Dessen. Keep reading »

Like This? Read This! 10 Young Adult Novels For Adults

YA novels — that’s “young adult” novels, for the uninitiated — have had a rough go of things lately. Slate.com came out swinging against the popular genre, claiming grownups should only read grownup books or else we’re all repressed babies. Or some such nonsense. Books are just books — they’re for people. Typically YA novels have more characters who are teens/children, but that’s about the only difference. There is still sex, drugs, violence, and everything! Ultimately, the YA genre or the “New Adult” genre are phrases used by publishers’ marketing departments.

I’m a passionate and voracious reader and genuinely saddens me that anyone would discourage people from reading anything. So, I thought I would ease some of the YA-averse into checking out some novels that are similar to popular “grownup” books — recommendations I’m making based on similar themes and tone. If you read and enjoyed the “grownup” novel, you’ll probably really enjoy the YA novel. And vice versa.

Young Author Cashes In On Her Book That Happens To Have The Same Name As A New Stephen King Novel

A Brooklyn-based author is having a pretty solid week, thanks to Stephen King. Yes, we’re talking about THE Stephen King. Emily Schultz published her debut novel, Joyland, eight years ago, but hasn’t seen much success from it until recently, when literary heavyweight King released a novel with the same name. Now, thanks to all of the nincompoops online who are accidentally purchasing her book instead of his, Schultz has been enjoying the fruits of Mr.King’s labor … and other peoples’ stupidity.

At first, Emily was annoyed that all of the idiots thirsty readers who accidentally bought her book were leaving unkind reviews of her novel on her Amazon reviews page, but she started caring a little bit less once her royalty checks started coming in, which she described as “for me, big.” Because Emily felt guilty about essentially cashing in on someone else’s book, she decided to start a blog documenting how she was spending all of her new money, and whether or not Stephen King would approve of her purchases. GENIUS, I tell you. Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Now I See You Author Nicole Kear On Going Blind In Her 20s

nicole kear now i see you

Buying your first piece of IKEA furniture. Backpacking around Europe. One-night stands. Splurging on dinner Friday night and spending the rest of the week eating ramen. These are just a few of the things most of us expect of our 20s.

Something that isn’t on anyone’s list? Slowing going blind from a degenerative eye disease.

It wasn’t on Nicole Kear’s list, either. And the Yale and Columbia graduate intended to live her life like it wasn’t. She moved to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career, fell in love, got married and even attended clown school. Yet through it all, Kear knew a degenerative eye disease she had been diagnosed with at 19 was slowing taking her vision away. She was told she had one good decade before she would be entirely blind. Her family and husband  knew about the disease (retinitis pigmentosa), but Kear was embarrassed and hardly told any friends — she had lots of excuses for why her eye makeup looked messy or she wouldn’t drive at night. However, Kear and her husband settled into new parenthood, and she had to come to terms with the realities of her disabilities, including learning how to walk with a cane.

I read Nicole Kear’s funny, fascinating memoir Now I See You in almost one sitting and came away from it thinking, I could be friends with this person. She’s smart, spunky, and makes it easy to put yourself in her (unfortunately, no longer high-heeled) shoes. I gave her a call at home in Brooklyn to chat about blindness, how she managed to write a book with three young kids, and giving strangers the benefit of the doubt.

Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular