Tag Archives: race

Report: #DarkSkinRedLip Founder Karyn Washington Dead At 22

karyn washington

Karyn Washington, the founder of the site For Brown Girls and the #DarkSkinRedLip project, has died at age 22, Clutch Magazine is reporting. On the #DarkSkinRedLip website, Washington posted photographs of Black women proudly wearing red lipstick; the project came about after the rapper A$AP Rocky said that women of color can’t wear red lipstick. With her site For Brown Girls, Washington sought to fight colorism within the Black community by embracing women of all complexions. In an interview last year with Jane Thang Productions, she called herself “empowered by other strong women and girls, even those who don’t know they are inspiring.” Washington continued: “Women who are doing what they can to uplift others around them and make a difference in their community motivate me to do the same. I think it is so important for women no matter what complexion, race, or religious background to be united in making sure our voices are heard – that we are being leaders and positive role models to the younger generation.” We are sad to hear about Karyn Washington’s death and hope she knew many women looked to her as a role model. [Clutch Magazine] [Image via AliyahMonea.Wordpress.com]

Girl Talk: On Being My Black Boyfriend’s First Black Girlfriend

Girl Talk: On Being My Black Boyfriend's First Black Girlfriend

The first time I asked my boyfriend if he had ever actually dated a black girl, we had not even met yet. It was during one of our online Skype sessions that the conversation came up.

“I’ve never really lived around too many black people,” he confessed.

“So have you ever dated a black girl?” I asked half-jokingly.

“No,” he responded simply.

Crickets… Keep reading »

The Soapbox: The ’80s Called And They Want Their Sex Wars Back

The Soapbox: The '80s Called And They Want Their Sex Wars Back

I’m writing this on an airplane from Toronto, Ontario, to San Francisco, California. I’ve just spent six days among other women, other queers, other porn performers, and other feminists at the Feminist Porn Awards and the Feminist Porn Conference. In that time, I have witnessed moments that made my heart soar, my eyes tear up with love and the fiercest of joys, pride in the people I hold close to me. I have experienced moments that hurt my heart, that disappointed me, moments that underlined how privilege can alienate and divide us. I spoke to academics, I spoke to sex workers, I spoke to sex workers who were academics. It was a weekend of realizations, inspiration, determination … and I came away from it all feeling exhilarated and ready to change the world.

I also realized that the sex wars are still very much A Thing. There are still Good Feminists and Bad Feminists, though the definition of which is which varies depending on who you ask. It’s saddening to see us fighting each other, women who have been called prudes for asserting their sexual choices attacking women who have been called whores for asserting their sexual choices … and vice versa. This is, of course, exactly what the patriarchy wants. While we bicker about whether or not porn is empowering, we are being systematically marginalized, turned away from jobs, thrown out of school, our kids and our workspaces and our money and our privacy taken away from us. The act of having sex on film or any other sex work may empower some and humiliate others, or we might start feeling one way and eventually feel another. (The same holds true for food service workers, though we ask that question far less often). In our current culture we are all experiencing and navigating the effects of capitalist patriarchy. Keep reading »

Stephen Colbert Responds To #CancelColbert By Shutting Down The Ching Chong Ding Dong Foundation For Sensitivity To Orientals Or Whatever

cancel colbert
Stephen Stands His Ground

Stephen Colbert has finally responded to the hashtag #CancelColbert, which was trending last week on Twitter. In true “Colbert Report” fashion, he did it in character as a pompous blowhard conservative who “doesn’t see race.” A quick recap for those of you who were down a hole all weekend: in response to a news segment about racism towards Native Americans, someone from the Comedy Central Twitter account tweeted a joke about Asians referencing an older skit from a prior Colbert show about racism. Some people on Twitter freaked out over the perceived racist slight and created the hashtag #CancelColbert, which eventually started trending. Although at least from what I could see, many folks tweeting it were saying not to cancel “Colbert.”

On last night’s show in a segment called “Who’s Attacking Me Now?”, Stephen Colbert responded to #CancelColbert … or, as he put it, “the dark forces trying to silence my message.” Keep reading »

Don’t #CancelColbert: Stephen Colbert Blasted Over Satirical Tweet About Racism That He Didn’t Even Send

You read a tweet that looks like it’s from a celebrity and it says this:

“I am willing to show #Asian community I care by introducing the Ching-Chong Ding Dong Foundation For Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever.”

Pretty racist and disturbing, right? Of course it is. Then you realize that it was tweeted from the Twitter handle @ColbertReport, which is run by Comedy Central, and came from the mouth of the character “Stephen Colbert” played by Stephen Colbert.

Oh yes, we are amidst yet another huge Internet outrage shitstorm that grew out of proportion in a New York minute.

The tweet was a reference to Wednesday’s episode of “The Colbert Report” about the Washington Redskins football team and their owner Dan Snyder. The Redskins have long been under fire for their racist team name (a reference to Native Americans) and the ownership’s refusal to change it, despite repeated requests from those in Native communities. (Check out the blog Native Appropriations for lots of backstory on this.) Recently Dan Snyder announced via the team’s website that they created the Washington Redskins Original Americans Foundation, which will “commit to making a real, lasting, positive impact on Native American quality of life.” In other words, he is using the offensive name in the title of the foundation they started to help those affected by the offensive name.  Keep reading »

White Actress Rooney Mara Cast As Native American Tiger Lily In “Pan,” A Peter Pan Remake

tiger lily rooney mara

It seems Hollywood has learned nothing from the barrage of criticism for casting straight actor Jared Leto in his (ultimately Oscar-winning) role as a transgender woman in “Dallas Buyers’ Club” or casting Johnny Depp, a white man, as the Native American Tonto in “The Lone Ranger.” Once again, an actor has been cast in a role that could have been more authentically portrayed by someone with the actual experience of the character: Entertainment Weekly  confirmed last week that Rooney Mara, who is white, will be Native American princess Tiger Lily in the Peter Pan remake/prequel called “Pan.”

Of course, acting is “acting” and any actor could hypothetically play a character of any race or gender. The problem is that Mara’s casting is an example of Hollywood’s longtime problem with whitewashing — take, for instance, white, blonde Jennifer Lawrence’s casting as olive-skinned, dark-haired Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” Hollywood could have easily found a Native American actress to play Tiger Lily. There are numerous Native American actresses who have appeared in other films about Native Americans, including Q’orianka Kilcher, who starred as Pocahontas in “The New World, ” or Irene Bedard, who was in “Smoke Signals” and voiced Pocahontas in the Disney cartoon. Or, since the character of Tiger Lily is supposed to be fairly young, the role could have gone to a new, up-and-coming Native talent. Keep reading »

Mindy Kaling On Diversity: “I’m A F**king Indian Woman Who Has Her Own F**king Network TV Show, OK?”

“I look at shows on TV, and this is going to just seem defensive, but I’m just gonna say it: I’m a fucking Indian woman who has her own fucking network television show, OK? … I have four series regulars that are women on my show, and no one asks any of the shows I adore — and I won’t name them because they’re my friends — why no leads on their shows are women or of color, and I’m the one that gets lobbied about these things. And I’ll answer them, I will. But I know what’s going on here. … It is a little insulting because, I’m like, God, what can I — oh, I’m sitting in it. I have 75 percent of the lines on the show. … And I’m like, oh wait, it’s not like I’m running a country, I’m not a political figure. I’m someone who’s writing a show and I want to use funny people. And it feels like it diminishes the incredibly funny women who do come on my show… I don’t know, it’s a little frustrating.”

This is Mindy Kaling‘s response (as quoted by Flavorwire) when she got asked at a SXSW panel why Mindy is the only female doctor and the only doctor of color on her show, “The Mindy Project,” which she writes, executive produces, and stars in. I don’t blame her for being defensive or feeling frustrated: it is a show written/produced/starring a woman of color with a bunch of female co-stars and yet these types of questions from journalists still insinuate that Kaling not doing enough. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Replacing Sexism With Racism Is Not a Proper Hollaback

street harassment

This post is reprinted from The Huffington Post with the permission of its authors.

What’s the biggest myth about street harassment? That men of color comprise the majority of offenders.

It’s a myth as old as this nation: the idea that Black men are more likely to be sexual predators — especially of white women. Consider D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth Of A Nation,” that builds an entire narrative on the idea of the black brute. From the Scottsboro boys to Emmitt Till, history as well as popular culture, the justice system and virtually all other facets of American society still hold the deeply entrenched notion of Black men as people to be feared.

But the myth doesn’t stop with history. In a recent New York Times article, a White woman living in a mostly Caribbean community (Crown Heights, Brooklyn) gets physically assaulted by a Latino man and wonders if it’s her fault, as if moving into a mostly Caribbean community was the city-dwellers equivalent to “asking for it.” A few years ago, a woman, also writing for The New York Times, reported on her experience doing aid work in the Congo and hearing repeatedly from other European aid workers that sexual harassment, violence, and rape in those areas “is cultural,” instead of, as she duly notes, “a tool of war.” The myth that Black and Latino men are innately sexually aggressive is one that extends beyond our national borders. Keep reading »

Lupita Nyong’o: “There Is No Shame In Black Beauty”

Lupita's Best Looks
The best looks of "12 Years A Slave" star Lupita Nyong'o. Read More »
Lupita Lightened?
lupita nyongo vanity fair
Did Vanity Fair lighten the shade of Lupita Nyong'o's skin? Read More »
Jared & Lupita?
9 Photos That Prove Lupita Nyong'o & Jared Leto Should Totally Date
Nine photos that prove Lupita Nyong'o and Jared Leto should totally date. Read More »
lupita nyongo

Yetsreday ESSENCE magazine bestowed Lupita Nyong’o the Best Breakthrough Performance Award at their 2014 Black Women in Hollywood luncheon for her Oscar-nominated performance in “12 Years A Slave.”

While receive this honor, Lupita gave an acceptance speech which was both heartbreaking and inspiring. She spoke about Black beauty and the times as a young adult that she felt unattractive for being so dark-skinned. She only saw lighter-skinned women on TV; as a child and adolescent, Lupita shared, she used to pray to God to make her skin lighter so she could be as desirable as them. Today, as a successful actress, she hears from young women who feel that same way right now.

Here is Lupita Nyong’o's full speech from last night, via ESSENCE. It’s extremely touching and well-worth a read: Keep reading »

I Haven’t Had An Abortion, But I Would

Late Period? Don't Panic!
Here are 7 reasons your period might be late which aren't a baby. Read More »
I Talk About My Abortion
True Story: Why I Tell Everyone About My Abortion
Why Amanda tells everyone about her abortion. Read More »
Why Men Need Abortion
men abortion reproductive rights
Why men need abortion as much as women do. Read More »

It was a Tuesday afternoon and I was on my therapist’s couch. I described for her an incident over the weekend when I felt sad, deeply sad, for seemingly no reason at all. I had felt reclusive and shy and wanted to stay in my bed; when my husband encouraged me to go to a birthday party that night that I actually wanted to go to, I had started crying. I’m a sensitive person, sure, but even while I was crying I knew my tears didn’t make much sense.

I shared some other strange behavior changes lately. I’ve been more hungry than usual, more often and ravenously so. I get snappish when I can’t eat immediately (hangry, I believe, is the technical term). I’m usually pretty easygoing, but lately I’d been having random mood swings. I was beginning to feel embarrassed about my behavior.

“You’re emotional … your appetite has changed …,” she paused. “Have you considered that you might be pregnant?” Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular