Tag Archives: quotable

Breaking: Actress Has Priorities Other Than Weight Loss

“It took nine months to build. It should take nine months to get off. I wanted fettuccini alfredo. I didn’t want a barbell…I was like, ‘Don’t talk to me about how fast and fabulous you are or it came off. That was not my experience. I’m having to work my ass off until I even think about getting it off.”

Drew Barrymore gave birth to her second daughter in April, and as would be the case for any actress, most people seem more interested in the state of Barrymore’s dress size than the fact that she brought a new life into the world. She told People that she had better things to focus on this year than dieting (like, I don’t know, raising two young kids and nurturing a career at the same time) and is just now considering ramping up her fitness. I’m bummed that she actually had to justify this to a reporter and that it’s considered a novel, newsworthy response. I’m still holding out hope for some far-off day in which new mom’s bodies aren’t up for public debate. A girl can dream, right? [People]

Michelle & Barack Obama Talk Racial Profiling

“I think people forget that we’ve lived in the White House for six years. Before that, Barack Obama was a black man that lived on the South Side of Chicago, who had his share of troubles catching cabs … I tell this story – I mean, even as the first lady – during that wonderfully publicized trip I took to Target, not highly disguised, the only person who came up to me in the store was a woman who asked me to help her take something off a shelf. Because she didn’t see me as the first lady, she saw me as someone who could help her. Those kinds of things happen in life. So it isn’t anything new.” 

Barack and Michelle Obama spoke to People about the racial profiling they experience, despite assumptions that the presidency somehow makes the couple immune to racism. Michelle also recalled an instance in which Barack “was wearing a tuxedo at a black-tie dinner, and somebody asked him to get coffee.”

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Jennifer Aniston: Feminism Is Not Complicated

“…people overcomplicate it. It’s simply believing in equality between men and women”

In the January issue of AllureJennifer Aniston sums up feminism in just one sentence. If we reminded ourselves more often that the movement’s bottom line is simply about equality, we’d all save ourselves a lot of grief. Aniston posed in a gorgeous topless shot alongside old friend Chris McMillan (the genius behind “The Rachel” haircut), and had a lot to tell the magazine about her right to simply be herself. She’s sick of the unfair pressure placed on women to have children and society’s silly tendency to fawn all over actresses when they choose to play an “ugly” character. [Image via Michael Thompson/Allure]

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Lena Dunham: “Why I Chose To Speak Out” About College Rape

Speaking out was never about exposing the man who assaulted me. Rather, it was about exposing my shame, letting it dry out in the sun. I did not wish to be contacted by him or to open a criminal investigation. I am in a loving and peaceful place in my life and I am not willing to sacrifice any more of it for this person I do not know, aside from one night I will never forget. That is my choice. …

When I finally chose to share my story, I did not do so in a vacuum. I was inspired by all the brave women who are now coming forward with their own experiences, despite the many risks associated with speaking out. Survivors are so often re-victimized by a system that demands they prove their purity and innocence. They are asked to provide an unassailable narrative when the event itself is hazy, fragmented, and unspeakable. They are isolated and betrayed by people close to them who doubt their reality or are frustrated by their inability to move on. Their most intimate experiences are made public property. …

I was ready to admit to the ways being sexually assaulted has shaped my sense of self as a woman entering adulthood, compromised my emotional security, and haunted me even during the most joyful periods of my life. I hoped I might inspire others to share, and that forming these connections would assist us all in healing.

Lena Dunham has penned a beautiful essay for Buzzfeed about her decision to write about being raped in college in her book Not That Kind Of Girl. The essay is written somewhat in response to conservative critics who have questioned the validity of her story and have gone out of their way to “disprove” it, including trying to track down the man who raped her. Yesterday, I told you about how one former classmate, who happens to be named “Barry,” the pseudonym used in the book, has been mistaken for Dunham’s attacker. Going forward, new printings of Not That Kind Of Girl will be more clear that “Barry” is a pseudonym; Dunham apologizes for the confusion at the beginning of the essay, calling the resemblance between Real Life Barry and Book Rapist Barry “an unfortunate and surreal coincidence.”  Keep reading »

Joni Mitchell Holds Onto Joy & Leaves Sorrow Behind

I don’t really want to paint sorrowful stuff, you know? Like, I get that out of my system. I guess what I was trying to say in the writing. You know, like “For The Roses” is really, you know, writing my sorrows. That’s probably the one. “Court and Spark” has got some of it. “Blue” has got some of it. That pocket. And then it kind of pulls out of there. But that’s when I really kind of addressed hurt. Those three projects…I’ve been through so much in the last five years, really hard stuff. And I’ve come through it kind of, oddly enough, still kind of in a good mood. I can’t explain it. [Laughs.] Maybe it’s just got so rotten, you know, like that there was no place else to go. So, no. I’m in a good space. I’m still in the middle of a bunch of really kind of sickening little wars, but generally I feel pretty happy, you know? It’s not that bad, you know. Things have been worse. I’ve been through so much in my life, you know…I’m a tough old cookie.

Music goddess Joni Mitchell, self-proclaimed “painter who happens to write songs,” once told a Toronto newspaper, “I sing my sorrow and paint my joy.” In an interview with NPR’s “Morning Edition” this week, Mitchell told co-host Renee Montagne that she likes to paint happy scenes and fill her home with joyful images, and Montagne asked whether Mitchell had given up sorrow and perhaps songwriting. Considering the melancholy lyrics that made her famous, I wouldn’t have expected this response. What an amazing spirit. She’s not a legend for nothing! [NPR] [Image via Getty]

Paul McCartney Reflects On The Anniversary Of John Lennon’s Death

“I was at home and I got a phone call, it was early in the morning…it was just so horrific, you couldn’t take it in…Just for days, you couldn’t think he was gone. It was just a huge shock and I had to tell Linda [Paul's late wife] and the kids. It was very difficult. It was very difficult for anyone. That was like a really big shock in most people’s lives, a bit like Kennedy… For me, it was just so sad that I wasn’t going to see him again…and for me the biggest thing was that the guy who took his life, the phrase kept going in my head ‘jerk of all jerks.’…This is not even a guy who was politically motivated, it was a totally random thing…it would have been the worst thing in the world to have this great relationship that then soured and he gets killed, so there was some solace in the fact that we got back together. We were good friends.”

Paul McCartney reflected on John Lennon’s murder on the “Jonathan Ross Show” to commemorate the anniversary of his bandmate’s death. The musician noted how glad he was that the two had reconnected since the Beatles’ breakup before Lennon’s death and what a shock the loss was. Thirty-four years ago today, Lennon was fatally shot in New York City at the age of 40. [Brooklyn Vegan] [Image via AKM-GSI]

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