Tag Archives: Parenting

Mommie Dearest: So-Called Overprotective Dads Are Doing Their Daughters No Favors

Mommie Dearest: So-Called Overprotective Dads Are Doing Their Daughters No Favors

A tale as old as time. A so-called overprotective father writes an extreme list of demands for dating his (currently only 2-year-old) daughter, and it goes viral. Retired Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell took to his public Facebook page to rant about all the things he’ll do to any potential suitor that may take a liking to his little girl. Among the challenges Luttrell would pose to any future Romeo:

  • Make him contact all the toughest dads that he knows — MMA fighters, boxers, police officers, firefighters and police guards – to get their blessing to date his daughter.
  • Make him meet Luttrell’s teammates to get their blessing, while being introduced to their armory (aka scare the shit out of some kid with a bunch of guns). Keep reading »

White Mother Sues Sperm Bank After Giving Birth To Mixed Race Baby

White Mother Sues Sperm Bank After Giving Birth To Mixed Race Baby

According to the Chicago Tribune, Jennifer Cramblett, who is white, is suing Midwest Sperm Bank for “wrongful birth and breach of warranty” because, she alleges, the sperm bank gave her African-American sperm instead of the white sperm she requested and thus she gave birth to a mixed race baby. Citing the “emotional and economic losses she has suffered,” Cramblett goes on to say her in suit that while she and her white female partner, Amanda Zinkon, love their daughter Payton “very much,” they live “each day with fears, anxieties and uncertainty about her future and Payton’s future.” Apparently, Cramblett and Zinkon live in a rather close-minded, very white town and raising a mixed race baby has been “stressful.” Additionally, the couple was also each raised in predominantly white communities with stereotypical attitudes about nonwhites, the lawsuit states, and didn’t meet any African-Americans until college. The lawsuit goes on, “Because of this background and upbringing, Jennifer acknowledges her limited cultural competency relative to African-Americans and steep learning curve, particularly in small, homogenous Uniontown, which she regards as too racially intolerant.” For example, Cramblett must take Payton to get her hair cut in an African-American neighborhood, “where she is obviously different in appearance, and not overtly welcome.” Keep reading »

Exercise Could Be An Important Treatment for ADHD

The journal Pediatrics published research today that suggests — pretty strongly — that physical activity is important for kids who have ADHD because it increases executive control and inhibition, much in the way that ADHD medications do. Exercise: Possibly the best thing for all mental health?

No word as to how it affects adult ADHD, but I’d wager that it’s also beneficial. James Hamblin at The Atlantic raises a really important point about how we treat kids with ADHD:

“‘If physical activity is established as an effective intervention for ADHD,” they continued, “it will also be important to address possible complementary effects of physical activity and existing treatment strategies …’ Which is a kind of phenomenal degree of reservation compared to the haste with which millions of kids have been introduced to amphetamines and other stimulants to address said ADHD. The number of prescriptions increased from 34.8 to 48.4 million between 2007 and 2011 alone. The pharmaceutical market around the disorder has grown to several billion dollars in recent years while school exercise initiatives have enjoyed no such spoils of entrepreneurialism.”

Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: Your Kids Need To Know About Consent Long Before They Head To College

MD sexual assault
Teach Boys Not To Rape
On Steubenville High School and teaching boys not to rape. Read More »

Talking about sexual assault is never an easy thing. But as a parent, it’s crucial to find ways to talk to your children about it. Lately, there’s been a lot of attention focused on campus rape and sexual assault, and with good reason. Many colleges have been called out (and even sued) for not taking the right steps in handling sexual assaults that take place on campus, which has sparked the Campus Accountability and Safety Act bipartisan bill that could improve the way colleges deal with sexual violence.

What’s a parent to do? It can be difficult to figure out where to start with all of this, especially in talking about it to our own children. Recently, there have been a few resources that parents may want to look into. In hopes of providing a jumping off point for folks to discuss sexual assault,the White House recently unveiled their It’s On Us campaign, using videos of celebrities taking the pledge to keep women and men safe from sexual assault. The idea sounds really great and revolutionary at first glance — celebs like Jon Hamm, Connie Britton, and Questlove all standing up against sexual assault. The heart of the campaign is in the right place. But the execution leaves a bit to be desired. Keep reading »

Please, Please, Please Do Not Get A Weight Loss App For Your Kids

Oh, great, there’s a new weight loss app for kids. That’s awesome. I know I would’ve loved that when I was a kid.

You know what was the best thing about my childhood? Everything that didn’t have to do with being hyper-aware of my weight and what food I was or wasn’t “supposed” to eat. Like, seriously, everything else. I loved school, I was in community theatre, I took art classes, I played dress-up with my sister, I listened to music, my family went to museums, we road tripped, I had awesome adventures with my friends. But I was very tall, kind of stocky (genetically), and overweight on top of that. Not extremely overweight, just chubby. But it was treated like a fucking crisis, both by my parents and doctors and by my peers, who called me the Pillsbury Dough Girl, poked my stomach, and then got mad at me when I didn’t accordingly feel like going “hm-hmmm!” Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: On Adrian Peterson, Discipline & Child Abuse

MD Adrian Peterson

Growing up, I was occasionally threatened with “the belt,” or asked if I wanted a “patch on my tuchus” whenever I behaved extra naughty. But that’s all they were — threats. Instead, my parents sent me to my room, took away prized privileges, or assigned me extra chores. Now, with my own son, there aren’t even threats. There are other methods of discipline that are more than effective for us so I don’t need to hit, whip or spank my son in order to get him to behave.

I’ve never quite understood the idea of corporal punishment as a method of discipline. In my mind, discipline is used in order to shape good behavior while eliminating bad behavior. In the best case scenario, inflicting pain as punishment, especially when used on young children who may not quite understand what is going on, breeds fear and resentment. In the worst case scenario, it breeds the notion that physical violence is acceptable. In fact, studies have shown that the use of physical punishment actually increases violent behavior in children.

But what if your defense is that you beat your child out of love? Keep reading »

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