Tag Archives: new york times

What’s Your Ideal Skirt Length?

Every few weeks, without fail, trend makers come out with a new style forecast, predicting what everyone will be wearing in the coming months. RIght now, The New York Times style section is calling for longer hems, citing dresses and skirts that skim ankles or end at the calf. But when you’re short, those longer lines don’t always work well. At five feet tall, I find that the perfect length for me is mid-knee–short enough that I look proportioned, but not so short that I feel like I’m dressing too young for my age (32). But everyone’s different, and what’s mini for you, might be maxi for someone else. So tell us: what’s your ideal skirt length? And what’s your favorite go-to skirt? Keep reading »

Politics Bloggers Are All Male, Natch

What Are SlutWalks?
SlutWalk photo
SlutWalks are sexually empowering for women! Read More »
Book Review Sexism
Jodi Picoult Twitter
Author Jodi Picoult says book reviewers favor white men. Read More »

To be sure, the young politics bloggers interviewed are all precociously talented and their success at a young age is impressive. Brian Beutler, 28, is a reporter for the online publication Talking Points Memo. David Weigel, 29, is a political reporter for Slate.com and a contributor to MSNBC. Ezra Klein, 26, wrote for The American Prospect and now The Washington Post. Matt Yglesias, 29, is a blogger for Think Progress, the blog for the Center for American Progress.

The problem with the piece, though, is the complete exclusion of female politics bloggers and reporters. They definitely exist … so why exclude them? Why was it necessary to report the “story” — and yes, “story” belongs in quotes — with only young male bloggers? Does that make any sense whatsoever? It comes off as needlessly clubby … almost like a … what’s that word again? A boys’ club. Oh yes, it comes off like a boys’ club. And a boys’ club is perpetuated by many factors, in particular the opportunities afforded to some privileged members over others. Opportunities, like, say, NY Times’ profiles.

The thing is, journalism and blogging in 2011, as far as I’ve seen from my six or so years working in those disciplines, are not total boys’ clubs. There are female politics bloggers and writers in Washington, D.C., and New York City, and anywhere else you go looking for them. The more you look for, the more you find. Why The NY Times either chose not to look, or chose not to include, any women at all other than mentioning in passing that Annie Lowrey is a 26-year-old reporter for Slate, is shameful.

So, I’ll try to be helpful, NY Times, and give you some names of female politics bloggers and/or reporters who perhaps eluded your gaze when you’re wearing those douchey spectacles of sexist trend pieces:

And that’s just to start (although, it’s admittedly a predominantly white list). I could go on and on and on.

Also, I love this parody piece written by Ann Friedman, a former editor at Feministing and The American Prospect, that sends up the stupid New York Times article. Definitely check it out here and be sure to check out Ann’s Tumblr called Lady Journos that curates the work of “journalists who happen to be women.” Because, you know, sometimes they’re just so hard to find. Or something.

[New York Times]
[AnnFriedman.com]

NY Times Wedding Announcement Begs The Question: Do You Have A Favorite Shape?

I read the New York Times wedding section every weekend with a mixture of fascination and romanticism. I look for the number of women who “were” employed at a specific profession “before her marriage,” i.e., she’s now married to someone rich and a happy housewife. I count the Ivy League universities and quirky wedding additions, like the couple that registered for goats. But this weekend’s main wedding article gave me something new to think about — do I have a favorite shape? Ana Meier and Daniel Creighton were married this weekend in East Hampton in Long Island, NY. Meier is a furniture designer, which I suppose sort of slightly explains the utter ridiculousness of the Times‘ description of the couple’s second date:

They had their next date at a Japanese restaurant, Cube 63, perfect for Ms. Meier, whose favorite shape is the square.

Keep reading »

Study Of “The New York Times Book Review” Finds More Men Get Novels Reviewed Than Women

Last week, I posted about authors Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Weiner and their reactions to fellow writer Jonathan Franzen’s latest novel, Freedom. They weren’t just rankled that Franzen was lauded on the cover of Time magazine as a “Great American Novelist.” Or even that fact that it made headlines when President Obama snagged an advance copy. Picoult and Weiner were upset that The New York Times Book Review had reviewed Freedom twice in one week.

“Is anyone shocked?” Picoult tweeted. “Would love to see the Times write about authors who aren’t white male literary darlings.” There was a hell of a lot of fallout from this, which, frankly, would be quite lengthy explain; I suggest you read NYmag.com’s thorough recap if this whole story interests you. In any case, while I personally shared Picoult and Weiner’s opinion that female writers are revered less in general from the get-go, as of today there is now hard data to back up their complaint against the Times Book Review. Keep reading »

NY Times Stupefied By Women Who Love Their Small Busts

Holy crap! Believe it or not, there are some women out there who have small boobs and actually like them. Shocked by this notion, The New York Times examines the beguiling trend of A-cups who aren’t trying to be D-cups.

The crux of the article: Small-breasted women are embracing their lack of curves — and specialty lingerie shops have begun to realize that small-boobed women wand to look and feel sexy, too.

Our question: How is this at all news? Women of all body types and shapes should embrace their sexiness — regardless of cup size. And it doesn’t take a NY Times trend story on boobs to know that. [New York Times] Keep reading »

How To Get Your Wedding Announcement In The New York Times

Wedding season is upon us and one of the many items on a bride and groom’s long to-do/wish list may very well include having their wedding announcement published in the New York Times (or not!). This time last year, when my husband and I were planning a wedding, we figured it was a pretty long shot getting our own announcement published, but we also thought our families — and friends … and future kiddos — would get a kick out of it if we somehow made it happen. Kinda like, “Can you believe the Times actually let those dorks grace its pages?” And you know what? It did! My husband and I are not rich, don’t have particularly impressive pedigrees, didn’t graduate from Ivy League schools, and can’t call ourselves doctors, lawyers or investment bankers (at least, not with a straight face), but the New York Times still published our wedding announcement anyway. And if the Paper of Record can let a couple of average Joes like us into their esteemed wedding section, it’s certainly possible for you to land a coveted slot too. After the jump, check out my tips for getting your wedding announcement published in the New York Times. Keep reading »

The New York Times Distorts Image Of Christina Hendricks, Calls Her “Big”

The other day, we posted a poll on the best-dressed women at the Golden Globes. For those of you who haven’t checked it, Christina Hendricks, the redheaded siren of “Mad Men,” who dressed in a peach-colored Christian Siriano gown, is far and away the winner with over 22 percent of the votes. Cathy Horyn, a style blogger at the Times, however, disagreed with our poll’s results, going so far as to quote a stylist who said, “You don’t put a big girl in a big dress. That’s rule number one.” And seemingly to drive home the point of just how terribly big Hendricks really is, the Times ran an altered photo of her (left image) making her appear broader than normal. Keep reading »

Evidently, Tough Girl Chic Is On The Rise

Remember last month when we reported on the New York Times‘ piece on androgyny in modern day street style? (Since gender bending in fashion is nothing new, we also took the opportunity to name our favorite cross dressing style icons.) This month, the newspaper’s style editors are clearly still fixated, because now they’re asserting that the ladylike look is dead, or as they cutely put it, the “damsel is in distress.” But more astutely, they’re putting their ink-smudged fingers on a trend that all the cool girls have been aware of for a long time: Your average 20- or 30-something has absolutely zero interest in dressing like Megan Fox. As the Times says, “If the old ideal of sexiness was the shoulder-baring voluptuousness of Scarlett Johansson, the new sexy is the European fashion editor Carine Roitfeld in a black blazer and tall vixenish boots.” It’s all about authenticity. Keep reading »

Was A Gift Guide For People “Of Color” Really Necessary?

Sometimes a gesture that was meant to be politically correct and progressive actually turns out to be offensive. Take, for instance, the New York Timesgift guide for people “of color.” Not only does this guide assume that blacks, Asians, and Hispanics don’t like the same things as whites, but it also assumes its target audience has the same tastes. I (and probably most Hindus) would not want a gospel cruise and can’t understand why non-white people need specific nail polish colors. And just so you know, black women don’t want to receive hair products as gifts, especially when our hair is described as “problem hair.” It’s not a problem for us, and if it is a problem for you New York Times folks, well, then that’s your problem. And we probably already know what products work on our hair, thank you very much. I know the Times‘ intentions were positive, but you can’t wrap three races and several nationalities into a neat little gift and slap a bow on the package. What they should have done was simply add the race-specific ideas to the other gift guides. Maybe white people would like their children to read about President Obama or Sonia Sotomayor too. [NY Times] Keep reading »

“Modern Love Revenge” Proves There Are Always Two Sides To Every Story

If you’re like me, the first thing you do every Sunday morning is check the “Modern Love” column in the New York Times—a collection of first person essays about love of all varieties. Usually, I am wrapped up in the storyline, scrolling down the page, sipping my coffee, eager to find out how the saga ends, but every once in a while, I wonder what the other characters in the piece must be feeling as they read it—mothers, daughters, ex-lovers, and friends. Well, that’s what some writers over at Double X were wondering too. So they decided to start a genius column called “Modern Love Revenge” where they provide the subjects of “Modern Love” essays the chance to post their responses, rebuttals, and reflections — basically, to tell the other side of the story. I was especially interested in this response from Joyce Maynard’s daughter, Audrey Bethel. Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular