Tag Archives: mommie dearest

Mommie Dearest: No, Feminism Is Not About Stripping Boys Of Their Masculinity

Mommie Dearest: No, Feminism Is Not About Stripping Boys Of Their Masculinity

Recently, Tara Kennedy-Kline, a mother of two boys, took to the internet to proudly declare that she cannot (and will not) support feminism. If the title of the piece didn’t send up a bevy of red flags, the fact that it appeared on Thought Catalog should have clued me in to the fact that it was most likely suspect. And suspect it was. In fact, the piece was so completely obtuse, it almost feels as if it’s pure linkbait from one of Thought Catalog’s resident trolls. Yet, even if it’s 100 percent trolling, the sad fact remains that there are actually still people out there who think like this “mom.” Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: Seriously, Stop Policing Mothers’ Bodies

Mommie Dearest: Seriously, Stop Policing Mothers' Bodies

Kim Kardashian recently posed naked for Paper magazine, and despite the prediction, she did not actually break the internet. Instead, she got a whole lot of people talking. While many people are naturally talking about her shiny posterior, others are rightfully discussing the racial implications of the photoshoot. Along with the thoughtful critique, there’s also a hefty dose of personal opinion, like “Glee” actress Naya Rivera who left a snarky comment on Kardashian’s Instagram, reminding the reality star that she is — gasp! — someone’s mother! And Rivera isn’t the only one. Tons of internet commenters brought up the fact that Kardashian is a mother, as if mothers all of a sudden stop being sexy or sexual after they have sex that one time to reproduce. I have no clue what Rivera’s plans are for her own uterus, but I wonder if she’ll stop participating in scantily clad photo shoots once she gives birth? Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: The “Mommy” Problem

Mommie Dearest: The "Mommy" Problem

“Mommy!” Coming from anyone other than your child it can certainly sound sickeningly saccharine, diminutive, and even mocking. But at the moment, all things Mommy reign supreme. This past weekend, Heather Havrilesky (who writes the awesome advice column Dear Polly, BTW) addressed this dichotomy for the New York Times Sunday Review in her piece, “Our ‘Mommy’ Problem.” Havrilesky writes:

Motherhood is no longer viewed as simply a relationship with your children, a role you play at home and at school, or even a hallowed institution. Motherhood has been elevated — or perhaps demoted — to the realm of lifestyle, an all-encompassing identity with demands and expectations that eclipse everything else in a woman’s life.

Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: On Lena Dunham & Teaching Children About Boundaries And Consent

Mommie Dearest: On Lena Dunham & Teaching Children About Boundaries And Consent

This post isn’t about Lena Dunham… really. So many others, including The Frisky’s own Amelia, have written about Dunham, her book, and the passages about her sister that have led to claims of molestation. But, I’m writing this because of the conversation that’s currently being had about Lena Dunham, so we can’t not talk about her.

The basics: Lena Dunham wrote a memoir and included bits about her relationship with her younger sister, Grace. Like the time Lena was seven and peered in one-year-old Grace’s vagina. Or the other time when Grace was older and Lena would give her sister candy in exchange for kisses. And then there was the story where Lena encountered masturbating in bed at 17, alongside her sleeping sister. Those bits got a few sites screaming “child molestation!” in Lena’s direction and the entire Internet has since blown up on both sides of it. But is it so crystal clear or black and white? When it comes to kids, sex, and sexuality can’t it be a whole bunch of fuzzy grey? Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: School Shootings, Toxic Masculinity & “Boys Will Be Boys”

Mommie Dearest: School Shootings, Toxic Masculinity & "Boys Will Be Boys"

Another school shooting. This time it took place at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington state. Fourteen-year-old high school freshman Jaylen Fryberg, pulled a gun out during lunch and began shooting, killing two 14-year-old girls, and severely wounding three other students before dying from a self-inflicted gun shot. Like with each school shooting before this one, we all sit back and wonder… why? How?

We can talk about guns as the root of all evil in these instances (Fryberg used a gun that was legally purchased) — and in fact, we should be shouting about the ease of access to guns in this country — but it’s not that simple. Because there’s more to it than just guns. Reports are slowly coming in that Fryberg may have targeted particular students at his school over a recent breakup. While we may never truly know his motivation, many are starting to piece together information gathered from fellow students and Fryberg’s own social media accounts. A student at Marysville-Pilchuk High School told the Seattle Times that Fryberg was “angry about a romantic relationship he was involved in, and that the girl was one of the people shot,” according to a student. Another student spoke about Fryberg and one of the victims, telling Reuters that she “heard he asked her out and she rebuffed him and was with his cousin.” The student boils it down: “It was a fight over a girl.” Keep reading »

Mommie Dearest: Moms & The Benefits Of Medical Marijuana For Sick Children

Mommie Dearest: Moms & The Benefits Of Medical Marijuana For Sick Children
Watch The "Weed The People" Trailer
Pot Mom
This mom smokes pot. Read More »

In their new documentary, “Weed The People,” filmmakers Ricki Lake and Abby Epstein profile the story of Sophie Ryan, who at seven months, was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. After much research and investigation, Sophie’s parents turned to medicinal cannabis oil, and the results were almost unbelieveable — the treatment was shrinking Sophie’s tumor. “Weed The People” — which will be out next year — looks at Sophie’s story, as well as the growing industry of cannabis medicine and the impact it’s having in the lives of patients. And Sophie is not alone. There are many patients — many of them children — that are benefiting from using cannabis oil or medical marijuana to treat everything from cancer to seizures. Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular