Tag Archives: mental health

Robin Williams Struggled With Depression, Addiction

  • Robin Williams had checked into the Hazeldon Addiction Treatment Center in Minnesota in June to help with a “deep, dark depression” and his ongoing struggles with alcohol addiction. Williams had battled an addiction to cocaine in the past, but had had long periods of sobriety. Yesterday in announcing the actor’s death from suicide, Williams’ publicist said the actor had been battling severe depression as of late. [Daily Mail UKTMZ; TMZ]
  • “Girls” star Zosia Mamet revealed she has battled an eating disorder nearly her whole life. [Glamour] Keep reading »

Demi Moore’s Daughter Tallulah Willis Opens Up About Body Dysmorphia

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Tallulah Talks About Her Eating Disorder

Twenty-year-old Tallulah Willis, youngest daughter of Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, gets really candid in a new video for the personal style site Stylelikeu, opening up about her eating disorder, body dysmorphia. “I’m diagnosed with body dysmorphia [from] reading those stupid fucking tabloids when I was like 13, feeling like I was just ugly, always,” she said. “I believed the strangers more than the people who loved me, because why would the people who loved me be honest? It was just a conviction.” Because she read on the Internet that people though her face was ugly, Tallulah reacted by dressing to show off her butt and her boobs; she then went in the other direction, losing a lot of weight and her curves. Only in the past year or so, Tallulah said, has she realized that her feelings about her body are only her own mindset. It’s really refreshing how little shame or embarrassment she has talking about this; Tallulah comes off as really thoughtful and intelligent. As someone who has had friends with body dysmorphia, I appreciate her speaking publicly and honestly about the illness and how it has been a long road to recovery for her. “It’s crazy to like yourself and not just like the way you look — to like YOURSELF,” she said.  Damn straight. [People Stylewatch]

The Soapbox: On Trigger Warnings & Facing Trauma

The Soapbox: On Trigger Warnings & Facing Trauma

When I got to my friend’s place for my self-defense lessons last week, he told me we were going to do basic self-defense techniques and toward the end, simulated assaults. The simulated assaults were walk-bys: We would walk across the room in opposite directions and he would either do nothing, or he’d very suddenly grab my throat and wrist. The purpose was to train me to react quickly and correctly if it were to happen to me in real life.

But it had happened to me in real life, and after the first or second walk-by, I wound up having visceral, vivid flashbacks to my former partner putting me in arm locks and finger locks, pinning me, kicking me, putting his hand over my mouth, pushing my head into the floor or the bed. I hyperventilated and cried, and my friend hugged me and helped me calm down. He also didn’t let me stop, because the things I experience will upset me sometimes and I still have to know how to handle it, especially when physical danger is involved.

Which brings me to trigger warnings. Keep reading »

10 Things To Never, Ever Say To A Person With Depression

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Clinical depression sucks and it’s only growing more common. Almost one in two people in the U.S. will suffer from depression or another mental health condition at some point and about one in 17 Americans actually has a serious mental illness right now.

Despite its rising rates, depression can be hard to wrap your brain around, especially if you’ve never had it. It’s not easily treated or cleared up by positive thinking, or yanking yourself up by your bootstraps, or shoving your feelings to the dark corners of the back of your mind. It’s so much deeper and more insidious than that. I once described depression this way:

“None of those external [good things you have going for you] truly register or resonate when you have depression. You can logically identify them as Good Things, and you know they are supposed to make you feel Good, but you can’t feel them, they can’t get in. It’s like your brain is wearing a full-body armor designed to keep only the good things out. Bad things … get ushered in instantly, like VIPs.”

People who don’t have depression don’t always know what to say that could possibly help to a friend or family member going through the all-encompassing yet simultaneously utterly numb sensation of your own brain turning against you. Here are a few things not to say (unless you want said friend or loved one to grow homicidal as well as miserable): Keep reading »

On Abuse & Seeing What We Don’t Want To See

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Here are two things I never expected to be told in the same breath: “You’re so skinny! This will look cute on you,” and “I’m pretty sure you’re lying about that time your dad molested you.”

Nine months ago, I confronted my father about sexually abusing me as a child. Since then, my communication with my family has been limited, and it caught me off-guard when, just two weeks ago, my aunt invited me to meet her for lunch. I impulsively agreed, and initially, we started on the right note. After a few minutes of polite pleasantries, she handed me a gift bag. Inside, I found a hand-me-down Ann Taylor blazer with the tags still on (“I love the pattern, but it just doesn’t fit me”) and a copy of Meredith Maran’s My Lie: A True Story of False Memory (“I learned so much from this book. It’s amazing how unreliable our memories are, don’t you think?”). Never before had I felt so flattered and insulted all at once. Keep reading »

8 Things To Understand About Panic Attacks & How To Deal With Them

panic attacks

I remember my first panic attack in more detail than I remember losing my virginity or the first time I drove a car by myself. (I guess vivid terror of suddenly not being able to breathe really ingrains itself into your psyche.) It was 1998 and I was watching the “Psycho” remake with my family’s French exchange student. During the infamous shower scene, my throat and lungs tightened inside me like a figure eight knot.  I got up and paced around the movie theater, unable to control my body and wondering if I was having a heart attack. I’ve had panic attacks periodically since then, probably due to a combination of biology and circumstance. I’ve made an effort to lessen the conditions that they occur in and for the most part, I live a pretty calm life. My anxiety only spikes in extreme circumstances, such as the rare times I’ve gotten temporarily stuck in a subway underground (I’m claustrophobic).

After a couple of years without anxiety attacks in my everyday life, I’ve started having them again. The stress is related to old stuff resurfacing in my life and the anxiety is pretty much the same, too: my chest tightens, my heart beats too fast, I can’t breathe, and I feel like I’m having a heart attack. (Or, you know, what I assume a heart attack feels like.) I’m 30 now. Panic attacks are still shitty and frustrating, but all the experience I’ve had coaxing myself through them over the years actually does makes them less intense and quicker to get over.

These are my thoughts on what panic attacks are like, how to deal with them, and what I hope other people could understand if they’re trying to help:

Keep reading »

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