Tag Archives: mental health

At-Home Electroshock Therapy Sounds Scary

You know what sounds like a terrible idea? At-home electroshock therapy. But according to The Daily Beast, this isn’t as terrifying as it sounds. Writer Casey Schwartz decided to test the Fisher Wallace Cranial Stimulator, which claims to target the limbic system and stimulate the release of dopamine and serotonin. The thing looks like a remote control with two electrodes you attach to your forehead, and could potentially help with depression, anxiety, insomnia, OCD, drug addictions, and post-traumatic stress disorder. And interestingly, Casey kind of liked the device. Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Brittany Snow On The “Love Is Louder” Campaign

Brittany Snow is one of those celebs who I’ve enjoyed onscreen — in the “Hairspray” remake, “Prom Night,” a singular episode of “Gossip Girl” during a Lily Van Der Woodsen flashback — but didn’t think much about. But it turns out, she’s actually a really cool person with a big heart. Brittany works closely with several organizations to promote mental health in young people, based on her own experiences being bullied in school, and later, as she told People magazine, battling anorexia, exercise bulimia (instead of throwing up, you exercise too much), body dysmorphia, and cutting.

In light of the recent suicides by LGBT youth that have cast a light on bullying, Brittany teamed up with The Jed Foundation, a suicide prevention group, and MTV for the “Love Is Louder” campaign. She’s urging people to tweet inspirational messages like “#loveislouder than hate” and “I’ve felt isolated and hopeless, but #loveislouder than the pain.” Celebs like Pink and Vinny from “Jersey Shore” have spoken out with “Love Is Louder” videos as well.

After the jump, I spoke with 24-year-old Brittany about “Love Is Louder” and her experiences being bullied. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: In Praise Of Mental Health Days

When I was growing up I had a friend who was as aloof as she was glamorous. She had a way of holding the cutest and most charming boys in her thrall and all the girls wanted her to like them. Whenever she had problems with her romances, her schoolwork, her friends or her family, she was very mysterious about it. Her glass facade never shattered in public and very seldom would she even admit to having problems at all. Some days, random Tuesdays or Thursdays, she wouldn’t be in school, even though she hadn’t looked sick the day before. She would call them her “mental health days.”

She seemed very melodramatic to me, as if this were all just part of her act. But it was also exciting. My mother is a lot like Betty Draper and she would say to me when I was growing up that if I was not bleeding, I was fine. That kind of mothering doesn’t exactly teach someone self-care: if I didn’t want to go to school, I would lock myself in my bedroom and shriek at my mother through the door that I wanted to be left alone. A “mental health day,” on the other hand, sounded so grown-up, like she was taking a “personal day” at the office and we weren’t just a couple of 10th graders. I could imagine my friend calm and collected, attending to her own needs like a cat licking his paws. Maybe it was melodramatic, but it still sounded nice. Keep reading »

Study Says Some Abused Women See Partners As “Affectionate” And “Dependable”

A study of data from U.S. National Institute on Mental Health published in the journal Violence Against Women has found that many women who endure physical, sexual and psychological abuse from their male partners see them as “dependable” and even “affectionate.” Researchers from Adelphi University in New York and St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto examined the data — which was on 611 low-income, mostly African-American women from urban areas, with an average age of 35 — and saw 43 percent said they had been abused by an intimate partner within the last year. Of the abused women, 54 percent said their partners were reliable, 44 percent said they were dependable yet abusive, and 38 percent said the men were dependable yet controlling. Only 18 percent — or less than one fifth of the abused women — said their partners were dangerously abusive. According to Time, the authors of the study hope that this insight into the minds of victims of domestic violence will help them help women. Keep reading »

Study Says Some Abused Women See Partners As “Affectionate” And “Dependable”

Girl Talk: I Dated A Psychotherapist

If you had brain cancer, would you date a neurologist? Would you sleep with a chiropractor to ease your chronic back pain? Around my twentieth birthday, I was hit with a sudden onset of crippling depression and anxiety. After two years, several doctors and a veritable rainbow of colored mood-altering capsules, I still felt hopeless. With no cure in sight, I fell for a psychotherapist. Keep reading »

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