Tag Archives: mental health

The Soapbox: Calling Suicide Selfish Is Selfish

The Soapbox: Calling Suicide Selfish Is Selfish
On Thoughts Of Suicide
Depression, Suicide & What I Do When I Need To Get Through The Day
How this struggling woman overcame her suicidal ideation. Read More »

Selfish (adj.): Lacking concern for others; concerned chiefly with one’s own personal profit or pleasure.

Death is not profitable or pleasurable. It’s just nothing. It’s just not suffering. It has nothing to do with benefiting or not benefiting oneself or others. Saying that someone was selfish for having committed suicide is like saying that it was selfish of a person caught on fire to scream in agony.

When the topic of suicide is brought to the table, my primary concern isn’t to address people who have suicidal ideation. Everyone else is already doing that: They say, if you’re depressed or thinking about suicide, please seek help. Keep reading »

Depression, Suicide & What I Do When I Need To Get Through The Day

Depression, Suicide & What I Do When I Need To Get Through The Day

I have struggled with depression and suicidal ideation for years. My darkest period was as recent as 2013. In fact, there was a day last September when I let my guard down for just a few minutes. It was enough time for me to walk into my kitchen, pick up a large knife, and touch the blade to see how hard I would need to press down to cut through my skin.

Sometimes that’s all it takes. If I hadn’t scared myself and snapped out of that headspace as quickly as I did, I might not be writing this right now. That’s the truth.

I’m not telling you this as a plea for sympathy. I’m telling you this because Robin Williams is dead, and like everyone else on the Internet, I am deeply sad about that. Yes, part of my sadness is because I grew up watching him in “Mrs. Doubtfire,” “Aladdin,” “The Birdcage,” and “Dead Poets Society,” and it’s awful to think of someone as talented as he is gone so soon. But another part of my sadness is because suicide is always heartbreaking. I know people who have committed suicide. I know people who have attempted and considered suicide. I am someone who has considered suicide. It is a serious problem that far too many of us know all too well. Keep reading »

Robin Williams Struggled With Depression, Addiction

  • Robin Williams had checked into the Hazeldon Addiction Treatment Center in Minnesota in June to help with a “deep, dark depression” and his ongoing struggles with alcohol addiction. Williams had battled an addiction to cocaine in the past, but had had long periods of sobriety. Yesterday in announcing the actor’s death from suicide, Williams’ publicist said the actor had been battling severe depression as of late. [Daily Mail UKTMZ; TMZ]
  • “Girls” star Zosia Mamet revealed she has battled an eating disorder nearly her whole life. [Glamour] Keep reading »

Demi Moore’s Daughter Tallulah Willis Opens Up About Body Dysmorphia

tallulah willis
Tallulah Talks About Her Eating Disorder

Twenty-year-old Tallulah Willis, youngest daughter of Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, gets really candid in a new video for the personal style site Stylelikeu, opening up about her eating disorder, body dysmorphia. “I’m diagnosed with body dysmorphia [from] reading those stupid fucking tabloids when I was like 13, feeling like I was just ugly, always,” she said. “I believed the strangers more than the people who loved me, because why would the people who loved me be honest? It was just a conviction.” Because she read on the Internet that people though her face was ugly, Tallulah reacted by dressing to show off her butt and her boobs; she then went in the other direction, losing a lot of weight and her curves. Only in the past year or so, Tallulah said, has she realized that her feelings about her body are only her own mindset. It’s really refreshing how little shame or embarrassment she has talking about this; Tallulah comes off as really thoughtful and intelligent. As someone who has had friends with body dysmorphia, I appreciate her speaking publicly and honestly about the illness and how it has been a long road to recovery for her. “It’s crazy to like yourself and not just like the way you look — to like YOURSELF,” she said.  Damn straight. [People Stylewatch]

The Soapbox: On Trigger Warnings & Facing Trauma

The Soapbox: On Trigger Warnings & Facing Trauma

When I got to my friend’s place for my self-defense lessons last week, he told me we were going to do basic self-defense techniques and toward the end, simulated assaults. The simulated assaults were walk-bys: We would walk across the room in opposite directions and he would either do nothing, or he’d very suddenly grab my throat and wrist. The purpose was to train me to react quickly and correctly if it were to happen to me in real life.

But it had happened to me in real life, and after the first or second walk-by, I wound up having visceral, vivid flashbacks to my former partner putting me in arm locks and finger locks, pinning me, kicking me, putting his hand over my mouth, pushing my head into the floor or the bed. I hyperventilated and cried, and my friend hugged me and helped me calm down. He also didn’t let me stop, because the things I experience will upset me sometimes and I still have to know how to handle it, especially when physical danger is involved.

Which brings me to trigger warnings. Keep reading »

10 Things To Never, Ever Say To A Person With Depression

depression woman

Clinical depression sucks and it’s only growing more common. Almost one in two people in the U.S. will suffer from depression or another mental health condition at some point and about one in 17 Americans actually has a serious mental illness right now.

Despite its rising rates, depression can be hard to wrap your brain around, especially if you’ve never had it. It’s not easily treated or cleared up by positive thinking, or yanking yourself up by your bootstraps, or shoving your feelings to the dark corners of the back of your mind. It’s so much deeper and more insidious than that. I once described depression this way:

“None of those external [good things you have going for you] truly register or resonate when you have depression. You can logically identify them as Good Things, and you know they are supposed to make you feel Good, but you can’t feel them, they can’t get in. It’s like your brain is wearing a full-body armor designed to keep only the good things out. Bad things … get ushered in instantly, like VIPs.”

People who don’t have depression don’t always know what to say that could possibly help to a friend or family member going through the all-encompassing yet simultaneously utterly numb sensation of your own brain turning against you. Here are a few things not to say (unless you want said friend or loved one to grow homicidal as well as miserable): Keep reading »

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