Tag Archives: marriage

Men Inherit Their Cheating Ways

cheating photo

An unfaithful father makes for an unfaithful husband. You may now add this to your handy list of relationship adages to live by right next to, “If he treats his mother like crap, he will probably treat you the same way.” According to a new study done at Charles University in Prague, men were found to be far more likely to cheat if they grew up with a father who was unfaithful. The daughters of cheaters, however did not suffer a similar fate. The researchers’ conclusion was as follows: Good-looking parents produce good-looking children. Said attractive children have more opportunities to stray if they are men but more opportunities to snag a genetically desirable mate if they are women. But the attractiveness theory doesn’t quite cover the rest of the population. I mean, ugly people cheat too. How do they explain that? Well, it’s all about the motivation for the infidelity. The study found that of the cheating men surveyed, most were motivated to stray by sex and sex alone, while the cheating women only wanted to explore their sexual options if they were unhappy in their relationships. And that will be all for your “Differences Between Men and Women 101″ lecture today. See you next week for more interesting discoveries about how men are really into sex and women are really into feelings. [Daily Mail UK] Keep reading »

Where Did Public Proposals Come From?

Out of all the women who got engaged last year and posted themselves on TheKnot.com, 43 percent received a public proposal, ranging from the guy who filmed a movie trailer to the one who painted a mural in New York’s East Village popping the questions. This led Slate.com to wonder: how did this whole concept come to be? Keep reading »

A Completely Uncomfortable Engagement — Between A Politician And A High School Girl

This week in totally disturbing nuptials news, a staffer on John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign met his bride-to-be while on a tour stop on behalf of the Republican candidate. The only problem? Oh, she was 17, and he was visiting her high school. There are so many gross gems from the romance of 29-year-old Christopher Cox and his now 21-year-old bride Andrea Catsimatidis, featured in the New York Times Vows section this weekend. As the couple explains it to the Times:

“She was the only person I remembered meeting that day,” he said. Ms. Catsimatidis, who at the time was five days shy of her 18th birthday, found herself taken by Mr. Cox’s political convictions, as well as his boyish looks.

 

“All the girls were cutting me in line,” remembered Ms. Catsimatidis, now 21. “They all wanted to meet the cute McCain guy.”

Oh, uh, okay. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I Feel Pressured To Get Married Or Break Up

She found me next to the growing pile of crock pots and kitchen sets. I was seated near the bride, half praising her newest pair of plush monogrammed bath towels, half wondering if a fourth glass of champagne would be overdoing it.

She perched on a wing chair and turned to me. “So. How are you and the boyfriend doing?” Her eyebrows were arched and her lips pursed expectantly, as if she knew I must have a juicy tidbit to share.

“We’re doing well,” I said vaguely, determined not to let this friend-of-a-friend pry into my personal life.

“You guys have been together a couple years now, right? Out of school for one? When are you going to get The Ring?” She giggled and swatted my leg as if to say, “We’re so bad!” Clearly, she was determined, too. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I Feel Like I’m Married To My Best Friend

“I’ve been thinking…”

Oh, God. Those three words. My heart rate quickened, hoping the next set of words weren’t going to be awful.

“I want to move to live with you in D.C. I really do. It’s just … I feel like this is all happening so fast. In a few months, I could have a new job, new apartment, a new life basically, and I keep asking myself ‘Am I ready for this??’ I think I am. I’m almost completely positive that I am. But I’m trying to figure out what’s best for me AND what’s best for us, and I’m feeling a lot of pressure.”

As serious as

I’m the one who pushes the envelope a bit too far sometimes, and she’s the practical one who reins me back in. She doesn’t let me get out of hand, and I in turn force her out of her comfort zone a bit.

“What’s so funny?”

“We sound married,” I said.

She broke down in a fit of tear-inducing, breathless laughter. The truth of it was too ridiculous not to laugh about. Between gasps for air, she asked, “What’s your boyfriend going to think?!”

My best friend, K., is planning a total life-transplant to Washington, D.C. to live with me. The plan has been in the works for over six months, though we had always wanted to live together after we graduated college. She’s tired of living in the same city — and in the same house — that she’s lived in with her parents since infancy. Moving back home wasn’t exactly her first choice after graduating over a year ago, but in this economy it was practically impossible to save any money without making the move home. She’s eager to get out of the city and her parents’ home, and start a more independent life in a place with much more opportunity.

Last August, I also moved back home in order to save money. Like K., I’m ready to leave, and my parents and I have agreed on a time range for me to move out. I lived alone once and hated it, so I’m determined to have a roommate. I’d prefer not to live with a stranger, K. prefers not to live with a stranger, and K. has always planned to move to D.C., so it seems logical that we move in together. We’re looking at a deadline of anywhere between two and four months from now, which means there are a lot of details to work out in not a lot of time.

The impending move has forced us to think like an entity, like a married couple. We’re facing questions and hurdles that any committed pair would face in our situation. Where do we want to live? How much are we willing to pay? How much would we each like to save? What kind of job is K. looking for? Should she move before she finds a job to ensure she’s there before I have to sign a lease? What’s our long-term goal for the place we choose? When should she tell her current employer that she’s leaving?

Answering each question is an exercise in patience, compromise and understanding. There isn’t any, “Well, I want this so we have to do that,” or “I’m moving at this time and that’s final. Live with me if you want” … you know, the kind of passive-aggressive bitchy dialogue you might find between two female friends and future roommates. We find a way to answer each problem that faces us in a way that we can both live with and agree on, that will be mutually beneficial to each of us now and in the future. There are no ultimatums or snappy requests, because we’re committed to each other. We can’t be demanding because that’s not healthy for the relationship in the long-term.

So. Why the hell am I so committed to being with my best friend? Why is it so important that we make decisions together and sacrifice things for each other, when we aren’t a couple? We aren’t required to have a life-long dedication to each other, so why act like we do? Living with strangers isn’t that bad.

More than being best friends, K. and I are also business partners. We found out long ago, when we were roommates for three years in college, that we had strikingly similar goals for our life. Over the past two years we combined those interests and similarities and formulated a plan for an enterprise that we want to undertake one day. It has proven to be an all-consuming passion for both of us, and the fervor has only grown now that we’ve each been out in the working world for a year, at jobs that neither of us are overly thrilled to be doing. Living together isn’t a vital necessity, but it would make working toward this goal a hell of a lot easier.

I’m the one who pushes the envelope a bit too far sometimes, and she’s the practical one who reins me back in. She doesn’t let me get out of hand, and I in turn force her out of her comfort zone a bit.

The dream would flounder if one of us decided to leave or give up; we balance each other out in a way that we’re confident will prove very successful in the future.

Just like any committed couple, we’re looking at the bigger picture. Yes, asking K. to leave her job and relocate her life so that we can make more headway on our plan isn’t easy. But we made a promise to turn this goal into a reality years ago. So in sickness and in health, we’re sticking to that vow.

Rachel writes a weekly relationship column for the up-and-coming pop culture source The Morton Report. Follow her on Twitter.

Photo: Digital Vision/Thinkstock

Elisabetta Canalis Isn’t Worried About Marrying George Clooney

“In the future I will be married, but for the time being I am happy as I am. I don’t need anything to confirm how happy I am … Whenever I see my picture in a magazine, I know what is being written. They all say that I spend my time organizing parties and that my boyfriend does not want to marry me and be with me anymore. My boyfriend has not given an interview on his private life since 1999. Everything that you read is just a rehash of stuff that has been written in the past.”

Elisabetta Canalis, otherwise known as the girlfriend of George Clooney, talks to Chi magazine about how it feels to hear the press say her dude of two years is never going to marry her. She seems to have pretty good perspective on the matter. But as The NY Daily News points out, George has talked more recently about tying the knot. Earlier this year, he appeared on “Piers Morgan Tonight” and said, “I was married. So I gave it a shot. I’ve proven how good I was at it.” Yeah, that doesn’t sound too promising. Keep reading »

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