Tag Archives: literature

Frisky Rant: On Guys Who Don’t Read Books By Women

Frisky Rant: On Guys Who Don't Read Books By Women
Hot/Not Hot Books
Guys tell us what they like/ don't like to see on a girl's book shelf. Read More »

It wasn’t long after I started using OK Cupid in late 2012 that I realized I was just looking at the same guy over and over and over. Bearded, goofy, self-effacing, liberal arts major, non-religious, burgeoning career, presents as worldly — basically, hipsters. But that’s not why I say “the same guy.”  I say “the same guy” because all of them had, unfailingly, exactly the same taste in literature: Thomas Pynchon, Jorge Luis Borges, David Foster Wallace, Don DeLillo, Jonathan Franzen, Haruki Murakami, Junot Diaz, Charles Bukowski, Cormac McCarthy, Albert Camus, and Philip Roth, with a smattering of Hemingway, Thoreau, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Vonnegut to give props to the giants.

Not once did I ever see these men list Margaret Atwood, Maya Angelou, Barbara Kingsolver, Harper Lee, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Flannery O’Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, Bharati Mukerjee, Jamaica Kincaid, Annie Proulx, Susan Sontag, Joyce Carol Oates, or Zadie Smith.  Not even Charlotte Bronte.  Not even Mary Shelley. Keep reading »

Great Idea, Chipotle: 8 Other Places That Customers Could Use Some Reading Material

As we mentioned earlier today, Chipotle had the genius idea to feature short selections of original literature on their various food surfaces, like cups, takeout bags, etc. Not only does this help keep customers entertained while they’re dining, but it prevents the awkward eating-alone scenario from being so awkward, and it’s educational.  After I heard this news, I asked myself for about two hours why I never thought of it, because it’s such a glaringly obvious fix to a common human problem. Oh well. That ship has sailed, but here are eight other obvious places humans could really use some reading material. Let’s make it happen… Keep reading »

Literature Bro David Gilmour Doesn’t Teach Books Written By Women: “If You Want Women Writers Go Down The Hall”

“I’m not interested in teaching books by women. Virginia Woolf is the only writer that interests me as a woman writer, so I do teach one of her short stories. But once again, when I was given this job I said I would only teach the people that I truly, truly love. Unfortunately, none of those happen to be Chinese, or women. Except for Virginia Woolf. And when I tried to teach Virginia Woolf, she’s too sophisticated, even for a third-year class. Usually at the beginning of the semester a hand shoots up and someone asks why there aren’t any women writers in the course. I say I don’t love women writers enough to teach them, if you want women writers go down the hall. What I teach is guys. Serious heterosexual guys. F. Scott Fitzgerald, Chekhov, Tolstoy. Real guy-guys. Henry Miller. Philip Roth.”

This is Professor David Gilmour of the University of Toronto, who is interviewed today in a column called “Shelf Esteem” by Random House Canada. No foofy lady writers with their weight gain battles, dying children and Red Rooms Of Pain on these esteemed shelves! Gilmour is only interested teaching his students in the greats, who of course, have a big dick swinging between their legs, which helps them write.  The only “woman writer” who even approaches the dickitude David Gilmour needs in his writers is Virginia Woolf. And if you’ve got a problem that, you can go cry about it in the women’s studies department down the hall. (Also, no Chinese???)

[Random House CA] [Image via Random House]

The Exceptional Rise Of “I” And “Me”

Meet Thor Lund
thor lund
He wrote 5,000 words on what he thinks he knows about women. Read More »
Soapbox: Personal Essay
The Soapbox: On Hugo Schwyzer, Personal Essay Writing & Redemption
Thoughts on Hugo Schwyzer and redemption in personal essay writing. Read More »
Favorite Female Essayists
We love these female essayist. Read More »
Personal Essays
Kate Fridkis defends the personal essay. Read More »
The Exceptional Rise Of "I" And "Me"

According to a study published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, in an analysis of literature published between 1960 and 2008, the use of first person singular pronouns (I, me) increased by a staggering 42 percent. An article published in The Atlantic Wire looks at this exceptional rise in first person pronouns and writer Eric Levenson theorizes that it may be attributed to the increase in women’s writing. Keep reading »

Shakespeare In Spray Paint And Other Literary Graffiti

Who knew the combination of spray paint and prominent literary figures would be so delightful? Flavorwire tracked down the best examples of literary street art, including a Robert Frost quote on a London street and a Sylvia Plath portrait in Portland. More of our favorites, after the jump… [Flavorwire]

10 (More) Male Literary Characters We’d Like To Bone

If you want to escape your real love life, why not get lost in the pages of a great book … with a sexy leading man? I mean who hasn’t wished that they were coming home to Mr. Darcy after a long, stressful day? Asylum compiled a list of their 15 most sex-worthy ladies of literature after reading Lemondrop’s top 15 most do-able literary men. But I think they forgot a few characters with whom you might really want to curl up in bed. After the jump, 10 more fictional characters we really, really wish were real. So we could bone them. Sometimes it pays to be an avid reader. Keep reading »

“It’s Not You, It’s Your Books…”

The New York Times‘ Book Review section had an interesting, Modern Love-esque column this weekend about how hard it can be dating someone whose taste in books you hate. Like the writer, Rachel Donadio, when I was single, I seriously considered it a dealbreaker if a guy I was interested in had a thing for Ayn Rand — I think she’s a terrible writer and a total fascist. The guy could be the nicest person in the world, but loving Atlas Shrugged definitely told me he had a secret heartless side. Likewise, it can be a real turn-on to share a love for the same books with another person — I was once convinced that a guy and I were soul mates because we both loved J.D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey. But judgment of ones’ literary taste can go both ways — I certainly would be pissed off if a dude wrote me off just because I like reading V.C. Andrews and Sweet Valley High “novels” while I get a tan on my roof deck. So how important is it to you that you share the same interest in books with the person you’re dating? [NY Times] Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular