Tag Archives: last names

14 Signs You’ve Got Hyphenated Last Name Problems (In GIFs!)

Not Taking His Name
keeping maiden name and not taking husband's name
Jessica is annoyed people assume she's taking her husband's name. Read More »
Combined Last Names
Chris O'Dowd and Dawn Porter
Chris O'Dowd's new wife combined their last names together. Read More »
I Took Her Last Name
Bucking tradition, this husband took his wife's last name. Read More »

We might be a bit biased, but we think hyphenated last names are awesome. They’re more unique and egalitarian than a single last name, and trust us, they’re great conversation starters. The only problem? Some of the conversations they start are not particularly enjoyable. Yes, it is “a lot of letters.” Yes, our moms were feminists, WHAT OF IT?! And oh lord, don’t even get us started on trying to spell them out for people over the phone. Here are 14 signs your hyphenated last name — no matter how much you love it — is giving you a headache. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: On The Significance Of Names

Relationships and experiences are a big part of what defines who we are. For many, names become guideposts or signifiers of those relationships or experiences. For a long time, I couldn’t accept my dad and so the allure of casting of the McDonell name felt like it might relieve me of some burden. Of having him in my life, of dealing with the ways I am like him, of seeing him for the fully complex person that he was. I understand the desire to change one’s last name as a marker of starting over, especially when there’s something in your past you want to close the door on.

For a while, my plan was to drop the McDonell from my name, and just be Amelia Parry. It would stay that way when I got married and then, when I had kids, my husband and I could … well, we’d cross that bridge when we came to it. Ideally, we would hyphenate our kid’s name just as my parents had done with my name, until our child grew up and made their own decision about what to do.

But so much has not gone as planned. Keep reading »

Famous Men Who Took Their Wives’ Last Names

Earlier this year, a guy wrote to Dear Wendy upset that his girlfriend wouldn’t take his last name if they got married. Wendy’s response? “You’re not a hard-line traditionalist or a domineering macho type? Good! Then you shouldn’t have a problem with taking your wife’s name if you feel so strong in your convictions that a family unit should share the same surname.” It’s still not common, per se, but more and more men are taking their wives’ names for a variety of reasons—because their wife is an only child, because they like the sound of her name better, or because they don’t have a great relationship with their own father. Interestingly, there are lots of barriers up for guys thinking of doing this; it’s only an option in eight states. And in California, a dude had to sue to get the right to make the change. “I had a rough childhood with my father,” says Michael Buday, explaining why he wanted to take his fiancee Diana Bijon’s last name. “We never really got along. Diana’s father stepped up, gave me career advice. He’s family.” [USA Today]

Earlier, I brought you female celebrities who took their husbands’ names. It got me thinking, are there any male stars who’ve taken their wives’ names? The answer is yes. Find out who after the jump. Keep reading »

Dear Wendy: “My Girlfriend Refuses To Take My Name If We Marry”

I’m 26 and my girlfriend is 28 and we’ve been dating for a little over seven months. We both want the same things in life — marriage, kids, close ties to family on both sides, prosperous careers and a house in the ‘burbs. Things have been terrific, the best relationship either of us has been in, we love each other very much and recently moved in together. The thing is, my girlfriend has made it clear that if we marry, she feels like she would be losing a part of herself if she took my last name. It’s very important to me that a family unit share the same last name, though. I’m not a hard line traditionalist and certainly not a macho, domineering type — but I feel like something would be missing, or like I would not be totally and completely loved if my wife rejected that part of me. Likewise, hyphenated names do not sit well with me. We’ve discussed this and I’ve made it clear I will not marry or start a family with someone who will not accept my last name (which, by the way, isn’t something odd or off-putting like, say, “Latrine”). I did not deliver this to her as an ultimatum, rather, as part of a well-mannered conversation in which I also made it clear I would stay with her forever without marriage. I worry, though, that this difference has set an expiration date for our relationship. Am I being unreasonable? — Name Withheld

Keep reading »

Fashion Designer Shaves Off Her Bush

Lauren Bush, niece of George W., debuted her fashion line at Barney’s this week under the name Lauren Pierce. Explaining the name change to W, Lauren denied it had anything to do with her name being mud in much of the world, saying:

“It wasn’t a conscious decision…. Obviously my last name is associated with politics. But Pierce is my grandmother’s maiden name and my younger brother’s name. It’s not about downplaying my last name as much as it is about loving Pierce. And my brother is very flattered.”

Lauren also happens to be dating son of fashion legend Ralph Lauren, and one can’t help but wonder if he’s the one who gave her the career advice to ditch the Bush. Just the kind of thing every young woman wants to hear from her boyfriend’s dad. [via Huffington Post] Keep reading »

Girl Talk: What’s In A Name?

Since I got engaged early last month and began planning a wedding for this summer, I’ve been thinking a lot about what it means to be hitched. As someone who already lives with her husband-to-be, I wonder just how much marriage will actually change things, whether I’ll wake up the morning after the wedding feeling any different. I’ve also been thinking a lot about what kind of wife I want to be, what it means to be a “good” wife, and how — if at all — being a “good wife” could compromise my identity or personal needs and interests.

I don’t feel a pressing desire to “prove” to myself or anyone else that I won’t change, that I won’t compromise anything, because at some point I’m sure I will. (Isn’t compromise a big part marriage, after all?) But I’m also certain that while bits of my identity are bound to shift, just as I would expect them to with any big life change and new perspective, the core of who I am will remain the same. No new name, white dress, ring on my finger or any other traditional convention is going to change that. For better or worse, I am who I am and I’m pretty solid in my identity. So when I read a column in the Guardian recently by Abigail Gliddon, a woman who claims “when a woman takes her husband’s name, she surrenders her former identity and adopts his,” I wondered how she came to have such low expectations for other women. Keep reading »

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