Tag Archives: immigration

Life After Dating: When Your Partner Is Unemployed

life after dating unemployed

Growing up, my parents were able to provide a stable middle-class upbringing for me, my three sisters and my brother. I can understand now how fortunate we were not to worry about hunger, housing, or medical bills. Although my Mom made a point to show us how privileged we were  — I’m from Fairfield County, Connecticut, where the “wealth gap” between rich and poor is top in the nation — I lived securely inside a wealthy suburban bubble in the booming ’90s. As I graduated from high school, went to college and began my working life, I still managed to have financial security, even when the economy tanked in 2008. Some friends, recent college graduates like myself, lost their jobs or just plain could not get hired. But me, I still got to stay inside a safe little bubble.

Then I did something that probably didn’t make sense to some people, especially those from the background that I come from: I married someone who was unemployed Keep reading »

True Story: I Had My Immigration Interview

true-story-immigration

It has become abundantly clear to me over the past couple of months that people don’t know much about sponsoring someone for immigration. That makes sense, of course, because the majority of us will never do it. But insofar as people do know about the process, they know it involves getting a green card and having “an interview” with immigration officials. While true, but the interview and green card (hopefully) don’t come until the very end of an expensive, months-long process.

As I’ve explained before, sponsoring my husband, Kale, involved filling out a lot of paperwork. He had to do things like get a checkup and we had to gather documentation proving we like together, like bills and a bank account we both are listed on. We also submitted pics  — most of them culled from my at-times cringeworthy Instagram account — of ourselves together since we started dating and from our wedding day. We also had to write affidavits about each other explaining why we wanted to be together and our best friends wrote affidavits for us, too. It wasn’t hard work, but it was a lot to get done, especially for two people who are otherwise occupied being schmoopy newlyweds.   Keep reading »

True Story: I Am Sponsoring My Husband For Immigration

True Story: I Am Sponsoring My Husband For Immigration

There’s been one movie everyone has been telling me to see all year, recommended so many times that I’ve genuinely lost count of the suggestions. It didn’t win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It doesn’t feature actors that I particularly like. But I’ve been told that “The Proposal,” starring Sandra Bullock as a Canadian working in New York City who needs her underling, played by Ryan Reynolds, to marry her so that she can stay in the country, like, so closely resembles my life or something.

So I finally hunkered down this weekend to watch “The Proposal.” And  I’m sorry to report that just about everything in it— from the green card legalese, to the immigration official who crashes the wedding, to the lightening quick timeframe — is unrealistic. I can’t blame anyone, though, for accepting Hollywood’s interpretation of a marriage between an American and a foreigner as how immigration works. Over the past year, I’ve come to realize that most people don’t understand it (precisely because of movies like “The Proposal,” probably). Keep reading »

Watch This Father Sing “Home” With His Daughter And Fight To Bring His Mother Home

Help Make A Difference For Their Family!

Jorge Narvaez became an online sensation a few years ago when he sang a cover of “Home” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros on YouTube with his daughter Alexa. Now, he’s back in the spotlight with both of his daughters — this time, to spread the word in support of family reunification. Keep reading »

True Story: I Married My Gay Best Friend

True Story: I Married My Gay Best Friend

After my traditional engagement to my high school sweetheart fell apart, I was faced with the prospect of another devastating loss: the deportation of my best friend Emir. Desperate to stay in America, Emir tried every legal recourse to obtain a green card, knowing that his return to the Middle East—where gay men are often beaten and sometimes killed—was too dangerous. In an effort to keep him safe and by my side, I proposed to Emir. After a quickie wedding in Las Vegas, we faced new adventures and obstacles in both L.A. and New York City as we tried to dodge the INS. Our relationship was further complicated by the fact that my mother works for the State Department, preventing immigration fraud. In my memoir, The Marriage Act, I delve into the changing face of marriage in America and look at the emergent generation forming bonds outside of tradition—and sometimes even outside the law. 

Below is an excerpt:

I remember the citrus salads and late-afternoon Cosmopolitans in the sunny outdoor courtyard of the Abbey, our favorite West Hollywood gay bar. I remember how strange it felt to walk to his apartment rather than drive even though he lived only three blocks away from me. I can’t remember the precise instance when Emir first brought up the verging-on-problematic visa situation. It might have been at a sushi restaurant, or over lunches at the Abbey, or while in line at what the boys around the neighborhood called “the gay Starbucks” on Santa Monica. Emir wanted to stay in the United States past this year to avoid going back into the closet in Emiristan and living with his father. In order to stay, he had to find a job before his visa expired in December, a year after graduation. I told him I was sure he’d find something and I believed it; Emir was creative, intelligent, outgoing, and capable. The possibility that he might not find a way to stay did not cross my mind during those early conversations. Keep reading »

Chinese Woman Seeks Asylum In The U.S. Over Forced Birth Control

It’s worth a reminder sometimes that the term “reproductive rights” doesn’t just mean the right not not reproduce, like with abortion. Reproductive rights can also mean the right to produce, like in the case of Mei Fun Wong, a Chinese woman seeking asylum in the U.S. because she fears she’ll be persecuted for removing her IUD. Wong, 44, lives in New York City and has been fighting to stay in the U.S. for years. Back in 1991, the Chinese government forced her to get an IUD implanted as part of its one child per family population control policy. Wong said the IUD caused her physical pain, but doctors refused to remove it. She had it secretly removed by a physician she found for herself. When another doctor discovered during a routine exam that the IUD had been removed, the government held her for three days until she agreed to have it re-implanted. She tried to flee to Hong Kong, claiming she wanted to get away from being forced to wear the IUD, and was jailed for four months and fined. Finally, Wong arrived in the U.S. in 2000 — following her husband, who fled to the U.S. after his involvement in Tiananmen Square — had her IUD removed in New York, and now she wants asylum so she can escape the Chinese government’s “menacing” behavior. Keep reading »

Salma Hayek Says She Was An Illegal Immigrant

Salma Hayek looks kind of like an alien on the cover of V Spain. Which is fitting, because inside the magazine, she reveals that she was once living in the United States as an illegal alien. (Yeah, I don’t love that phrase, either. Sorry I had to use it to make that intro work.) “I was an illegal immigrant in the United States,” says Salma. “It was for a small period of time, but I still did it.” She doesn’t specify when exactly. It could be when she was a high school student at the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Louisiana. (She headed back to Mexico for college.) Or during her early days in Hollywood. Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Meg Whitman Accused Of Employing An Undocumented Maid

  • Meg Whitman’s undocumented maid claimed in a press conference today that she was fired after she asked the California gubernatorial candidate and her husband for help gaining legal status. Nicky Diaz Santillan worked for the Whitman/Harsh family for nine years and claimed they never asked for her legal status before employing her. When Santillan was let go, she claims Meg Whitman told her, “From now on, you don’t know me and I don’t know you.” Her campaign, which touts that Meg Whitman is “tough as nails” on illegal immigration, says the former housekeeper is lying. [Guanabee, Guanabee, MegWhitman.com]
  • Someone asked President Obama about his support for late-term abortions at a recent town hall-style Q&A. The president replied that abortions should be “safe, legal and rare” and that families “should be the ones making the decision” to have children, not the government. He did not directly address the late-term abortion question, however, other than to say laws prohibit them and “people still argue and disagree about it.” [CNN]

Keep reading »

Why Is Sarah Palin Talking About Barack Obama’s Balls?

Fresh off his gabfest with the girls last week on “The View,” Sarah Palin is taking a stab at the president’s masculinity. Appearing on “Fox News Sunday” yesterday, she said Arizona Governor Jan Brewer has “the cojones” — Spanish for “balls” — that President Barack Obama “does not have” to deal with illegal immigration. Arizona, as you surely remember, recently passed strict immigration laws which “would make the failure to carry immigration documents a crime and give the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally,” according to The New York Times. Keep reading »

Meet Gladys Castro, The Illegal Immigrant With A 4.09 GPA

Regardless of your opinion on immigration, we can all agree it’s a disappointment when finances prevent an intelligent person from obtaining an education. And 17-year-old Gladys Castro of Fontana, California, is intelligent: the senior has a 4.09 average at Kaiser High School, where she took Advanced Placement classes, led the Advanced Biology Club and was a member of the National Honor Society.

But Gladys is an illegal immigrant whose family left Jalisco, Mexico, when she was 8 years old, after two of her relatives were kidnapped and murdered. She will graduate from high school soon and has been accepted to U.C. Berkeley, where she hopes to study political science. Due to her illegal status, however, Gladys cannot apply for government student loans. Keep reading »

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