Tag Archives: hollaback

The Auckland Version Of The Street Harassment Video Is Just Kind Of Boring

Can This Please Be My Life?

Can this video be my life? This is awesome. The New Zealand Herald hired model Nicola Simpson to recreate the Hollaback street harassment video by walking around Auckland for 10 hours and filming it.

The result? Well, nothing. The time went by and Simpson was left, by and large, to go about her business. One man made a serious, concerted effort to talk to her in order to tell her she looked nice (and also ask her if she was Italian) and then apologized for stopping her, and another asked her for directions. That’s it. Keep reading »

An Open Letter About The Racist Undertones Of That Viral Street Harassment Video

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Nothing Like Being Followed To Brighten Up Your Day

Dear Hollaback & Rob Bliss Creative,

I have watched your collaborative video depicting the menacing street harassment of a young, white woman as she casually walked through the streets of New York. You captured dozens of men making unwarranted comments — some more “innocent” than others — as well as the incredibly uncomfortable actions of a young man who silently followed the woman down the street for an entire five minutes.

At first, the video looked like an obvious display of patriarchy and street harassment in its most evident and outrageous form. Those men had no respect for the personal or emotional space or boundaries of the woman who crossed their path. However, upon closer examination, it seems that your video is also an obvious display of one of the worst and most dated forms of racism: Black savagery and its inherent predatory hunger for White women. Keep reading »

Funny Or Die’s Street Harassment Response And The Difference Between Men And Women In Public

5 Minutes Of High Fives Would Hurt, Though

Funny or Die made a response to Hollaback’s street harassment video and, of course, there are buzzkills all around. People who sympathize with women say it’s making light of a serious topic, while those who don’t sympathize are complaining that this isn’t what it’s really like for men.

Of course it isn’t, it’s satire. Keep reading »

Anyone Who Says They Don’t See Street Harassment Happening: Here’s Your Proof

Nothing Like Being Followed To Brighten Up Your Day

My very female-friendly male friends have told me repeatedly that the frequency with which they see and hear street harassment in no way matches up to the frequency with which their female friends tell them they’re harassed. Well! Outfit us with cameras, and you’ll find out for yourself.

This video was produced for Hollaback, an anti-street harassment organization with an app through which users can report locations of street harassment and bystander intervention. In the video, which was filmed over the course of 10 hours walking silently around Manhattan, the woman is catcalled over 100 times, including one particularly off-putting incident in which she is followed by a catcaller for five minutes. Keep reading »

These Girls Are Using Art To Combat Street Harassment And I’m Loving It

The awesome ladies behind the non-profit Hollaback have turned to art as a method of fighting back against street harassment. Hollaback NYC held a “Girl Power” art workshop in a Brooklyn park recently which encouraged its tween and teen participants to create visible street art that spoke out against the catcalls and harassment many women face every day.

Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, known for her amazing anti-harassment public art project called “Stop Telling Women To Smile,” was on hand to encourage the girls to write their thoughts about catcalling using a Brooklyn wall as a canvas. Fazlalizadeh’s posters included phrases like “You Are Not Entitled To My Space” and “Women Do Not Owe You Their Time or Conversation” alongside female faces with bold, defiant expressions. The work is the result of interviews with women about their personal experiences with catcalling. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: Replacing Sexism With Racism Is Not a Proper Hollaback

street harassment

This post is reprinted from The Huffington Post with the permission of its authors.

What’s the biggest myth about street harassment? That men of color comprise the majority of offenders.

It’s a myth as old as this nation: the idea that Black men are more likely to be sexual predators — especially of white women. Consider D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth Of A Nation,” that builds an entire narrative on the idea of the black brute. From the Scottsboro boys to Emmitt Till, history as well as popular culture, the justice system and virtually all other facets of American society still hold the deeply entrenched notion of Black men as people to be feared.

But the myth doesn’t stop with history. In a recent New York Times article, a White woman living in a mostly Caribbean community (Crown Heights, Brooklyn) gets physically assaulted by a Latino man and wonders if it’s her fault, as if moving into a mostly Caribbean community was the city-dwellers equivalent to “asking for it.” A few years ago, a woman, also writing for The New York Times, reported on her experience doing aid work in the Congo and hearing repeatedly from other European aid workers that sexual harassment, violence, and rape in those areas “is cultural,” instead of, as she duly notes, “a tool of war.” The myth that Black and Latino men are innately sexually aggressive is one that extends beyond our national borders. Keep reading »

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