Tag Archives: harry potter and the deathly hallows part 2

Ralph Fiennes Wore Garter Belts Under His Lord Voldemort Costume

“It was an irritating costume to wear. It was too long and, sometimes, I would trip over it. The gusset of the tights kept dropping between my thighs, and this made it very hard to walk with any kind of dignity … Sometimes, when the stunt team got too macho, I would tease them with my inner thigh.”

—Ralph Fiennes, who played Lord Voldemort in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” explains why he began wearing a garter belt underneath his menacing robes. Somehow, this information makes Voldemort seem much less scary. Also, Ralph looks so different without a nose! It’s easy to forget that was him under all that movie makeup. [ONTD] Keep reading »

Harry Potter In A Minute, As Re-Enacted By Cats

Was yesterday’s “Harry Potter in 7 Minutes” too much of a commitment? Well, this video has kittens telling the basics of all the movies in the series, in a minute flat. Cute and efficient! Now go enjoy “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” which opened at midnight last night. [Best Week Ever] Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Neville Longbottom And The Glory Of The Late Bloomer

It all ends today. And by “it,” of course, I mean our decade-long love affair with the Harry Potter movies. For those young adults who came of age with Harry, what’s ending is an era. I am one of them – I was 11 when the first book was released, and 19 when the last one came out – and though I’m a bigger fan of the books than of the movies, I can’t help but feel a bittersweet blend of sadness and excitement as it all winds down.

We grew up as Harry grew up, and though none of us was involved in a good-versus-evil, civil-rights-metaphor fight-to-the-death with a vicious tyrant, we still saw ourselves in Harry and in his friends. We learned a lot from these books. For example, that sometimes, nice guys finish first and smart girls get the guy. We learned about motherhood and feminism. We learned that love is the answer to almost every question, and if “love” doesn’t work, try “expelliarmus!”

And more recently, as the cast of the movies has been hitting the red carpet to promote the movie, we have learned about the glory of being a late bloomer. Keep reading »

Lord Voldemort On The End Of Harry Potter

“It’s an interesting phenomenon, being the bad guy. If you think about it, the bad guy is always the hero in his own story. Here I am, ridding the world of the kind of people who are perpetually at Walmart and who fangirl Gilderoy Lockhart, and suddenly I’m ‘evil.’ Refusing to change my beliefs because popular opinion does not agree is praised when the person doing it isn’t also attempting to enslave the nonmagical race. … The point is that the Dark Lord does what he wants. If you don’t like my condescending attitude, bite me.”

—Lord Voldemort, err, He Who Shall Not Be Named shares his feelings on the “Harry Potter” franchise ending on The Daily Beast. But apparently this is not goodbye—you can still follow the dude on Twitter. Just not if you’ve been to Walmart in the past 365 days. [Daily Beast] Keep reading »

7 Minutes In Harry Potter Heaven

Until about three weeks ago, I had no idea what a Muggle was. I had, for the large part, avoided the entire “Harry Potter” series. But with “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2” coming out and everyone lamenting the end of an era, I started to feel kind of left out of a cultural phenomenon. So, on a rainy weekend, I watched all six of the movies that have been released so far. And they were great. But let’s say you don’t have time for that and you still want in on “Deathly Hallows Part 2.” Never fear. This handy dandy video will catch you up on the series in seven minutes flat. You are welcome. [BuzzFeed] Keep reading »

13 Inappropriate Celebrity Rappers

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Tom Felton, aka Draco Malfoy, has a new career in mind now that he has been released from his “Harry Potter” duties. He plans to go from wielding a wand to spitting some rhymes. “I was thinking of doing some [British hip-hop group] N-Dubz-style stuff,” Felton explained. “I am looking to get into the grime rap UK scene. I’m going to change my image—backward caps, the lot.” [Huffington Post]

Now my first reaction to this is: Tom, noooooo! But then again, I would have said the same thing about Drake when I only knew him as Jimmy Brooks on “Degrassi” and he is actually amazing. Still, Tom sure seems like he is about to join a grand celebrity tradition. After the jump, stars who had no business trying their hand at hip hop. With videos, naturally.

Girl Talk: How I Learned About Feminism And Motherhood From Molly Weasley

I was eight years old when I first picked up Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone at an elementary school book fair. My mom bought me a hardcover copy to take home and read at my leisure. Instead of tuning into the Disney Channel I devoured all 309 pages of Harry’s first adventure in one night. As time passed, I continued to keep up with Harry Potter. I read all seven books upon their immediate release. I went to midnight showings of each film, sitting alongside my fellow Harry Potter Heads with their broomsticks and faux-lightning scars. I even visited The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Theme Park in Orlando, Florida, this past January, courtesy of the best Christmas gift ever. Both the 90-minute line to get into Ollivander’s Wand Shop and the hour-long wait for a meal at The Three Broomsticks were well worth it.

I’m sad that my childhood journey with Harry will come to an end on July 15—fourteen years after my initial HP experience—with the opening of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2.” Some kids read the Harry Potter books and learned about Azkaban, love potions, and chocolate frogs. I learned about feminism and motherhood, thanks to one of the series’ most underrated characters:

Molly’s character is viewed the same way most view the role of mothering: she is under appreciated and not acknowledged enough in comparison to her true significance and what she accomplishes on a daily basis.

Molly is the mother of Ron, Harry’s best friend at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, as well as six other Weasley children. Her husband, Arthur, works at the Ministry of Magic and leaves her as the designated homemaker. Her character is short and plump, with flaming red locks that match the rest of the Weasley clan. She rules the roost and wears many different hats—caregiver and expert pie maker, activist and one of the only female members of the Order of the Phoenix, and participating fighter in the Second Wizarding War to name a few. In “Deathly Hallows,” Molly will go toe-to-toe with Bellatrix Lestrange, chief Death Eater and Lord Voldemort’s right-hand-woman, during the Battle of Hogwarts. In case you haven’t read the books, she plays a pivotal role.

Molly’s character is viewed the same way most view the role of mothering: she is under appreciated and not acknowledged enough in comparison to her true significance and what she accomplishes on a daily basis.

She welcomes other children into her family and treats them like her own. Despite her lack of financial resources, she always comes up with a decent Christmas feast for all guests invited. While Molly upholds the traditional stereotype of being a stay-at-home mom, she is a new kind of mom that’s revolutionary in children’s stories. She is not a submissive character by any means; instead, she uses her role as “mother of many” as a means of power and accomplishing great tasks.

Molly Weasley’s unique, badass mothering reminds me of my own mom. Their similarities struck me at a young age through basic, minor details; specifically when Molly sent a Christmas package to Harry Potter during their first year at Hogwarts because she knew he was an orphan and wouldn’t get many presents. My mom always buys my friends her own Christmas presents, too, I thought to myself.

On a more serious note—Molly’s ability to aggressively stare down any problem facing her family, no matter what the cost or sacrifice, confirmed my suspicions that she shared more than a few characteristics with my own mom.

Like Molly Weasley, my mom stayed at home, but redefined the traditional role in her own ways. She’s never failed to encourage my progressive thoughts, urging me to pursue my most radical opinions over a cup of Lipton tea and piece of homemade bread pudding. My mom raised my siblings and I to never assume just because she stays home with us all day, she’s responsible for doing the dishes after dinner—my brother, sister, and I are very familiar with a sponge and dishwasher detergent.

It was a form of magic to see the same qualities play out between this made-up mother character in my favorite books and my real mom. My views on modern motherhood were inherently affected by witnessing both mothers nurture all children who need them, not just their own blood; manage to hold their families together under any and all circumstances; have unconditional love and support, even in the most frustrating moments; and partake in empowering, female-friendly movements that positively influence their daughters and sons alike.

J.K. Rowling didn’t only provide a source of entertainment for readers through Harry Potter; her works of fiction serve as critical tools in shaping the ways in which we perceive real-life experiences. Underneath the Death Eaters and Floo Powder are characters, themes, and metaphors filled with a deeper understanding. The Wizarding World might be a whole world away from reality, but its underlying messages hold true. I’m just so grateful that my mom bought me my first Harry Potter hardcover at that book fair. My feminist consciousness wouldn’t have been the same without it.

Tom Felton Would Love To Play Villains For Life

“People say Draco is sexier than Harry. Harry is just a nice guy, surrounded by so many strong characters, whereas Draco stands out on his own. And there’s something about the way the Malfoys look. I wouldn’t be worried about playing a bad guy for the rest of my life … Let’s be honest. We weren’t picked for ‘Harry Potter’ for our acting ability — it was because we looked like the characters as they’d been written. We started out as rank amateurs, and we’ll be lucky if we’ve learned something over the past 10 years.”

—Tom Felton, aka Draco Malfoy of “Harry Potter,” talks to the Daily Mail about the character that made him famous and his hopes now that the mega-popular series is coming to an end. Last week, Emma Watson revealed that Tom was her first crush and now I’m kind of getting why. I like that he tells it like it is. Plus, when the newspaper asked about his final showdown with Daniel Radcliffe in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” he said, ‘‘I wanted them to run together in slow motion and hug.” Hilarious. [Daily Mail] Keep reading »

The Good, The Bad & The WTF At The “Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part II” Premiere

Emma Watson
It’s been a long time coming for you Harry Potter fanatics — the final film is finally here and Potter is all grown up. At this week’s London premiere of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part II,” the final film in the series, the stars (and strange Brits) were out in droves. Emma Watson looked ravishing, as usual, but how did everyone else fare? Check out the best and worst looks after the jump.
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