Tag Archives: girl talk

Girl Talk: On Being The Black Girl At Rockabilly Events

Girl Talk: On Being The Black Girl At Rockabilly Events

As sometimes happens, I came to it — rockabilly — for the clothes. I started collecting vintage clothes from the 1940s through the early ’60s when I graduated from college and was entering the working world, because I wanted more than black pants and a sweater for business casual. I clicked away hours on my laptop, gleaning important bits of knowledge from old photos and bloggers everywhere from Australia to Austin. These stylish women were wonderfully put together for work and play, and danced to a soundtrack of music more powerful and raw than what I’d been listening to at the time. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: On Consent & Why It’s Worth It To Keep Saying “No”

Girl Talk: On Consent & Why It's Worth It To Keep Saying "No"

When I noticed photographs in Damon’s apartment with a woman’s head cut out of them and an X drawn atop her body, I regretted not saying “no” earlier that night. I wanted him to like me and didn’t want to seem prudish and uncool. I didn’t want to limit my romantic options or life experiences. Now, I wondered if my efforts to seem easygoing would end up getting me killed.

It was 1999, the height of the swing dance craze. Every night, I went to a different Boston dance venue: Ryles jazz club, Johnny D’s, or St. Mary’s Church to be twirled and escorted to the dance floor on a bent arm. I loved time traveling to an era where gentlemen and ladies dressed up for an evening out and formally asked each other to dance. I grew up watching Fred Astaire and Ginger Roger musicals, and now I was living inside of one. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Sometimes Carpe Diem Doesn’t Always Work Out

Traveling Alone Perks
Twelve reasons why traveling solo rules (in GIFs). Read More »
Girl Talk: Sometimes Carpe Diem Doesn't Always Work Out

This January, I had a bad job interview. I performed the best I could, but they’d kept me in a room, coming in groups of two or three at a time, grilling me on why I wanted and was qualified for an entry-level customer service job for two straight hours. I’ve been employed in some way or another for the last ten years, and I graduated with honors last year. I couldn’t just say, “I need a better job than I have now, and frankly this is going to be a cakewalk for me.” Some of them said I was underqualified; some of them said I was overqualified. No one really seemed to have a real sense of what they were doing; HR was out for the day, so it was all sales managers. I was so upset and confused afterward that I sat in Merchandise Mart crying for a half hour before working up the courage to get on the train. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I Care Too Much About Whether My Celeb Crush Is Single

Girl Talk: I Care Too Much About Whether My Celeb Crush Is Single

It started when I was 11 years old. I was flipping through the very first Seventeen magazine my mom ever let me have (June 1996 — Liv Tyler was on the cover, if you must know) and I saw one of those  “hot guy” features. You know those “hot guy” features: A collage of very different, but still traditionally attractive actors and musicians. Conventional wisdom says there has to be at least one that strikes your fancy if you are a girl with heterosexual inclinations. (Otherwise, you can spend more time on the Liv Tyler profile.)

Anyway, I remember flipping through it and not being particularly struck by Johnny Depp or Edward Furlong or Jakob Dylan. I mean, I got that they were cute. I understood that women wanted to date them. They just didn’t speak to tween me.

Then, I turned the page and spotted a young Brad Renfro. He had greasy, tawny hair parted down the middle and he had such a direct gaze, that I truly thought he was staring me down. I immediately felt my first ever rush of sexual desire and developed my first all-consuming celebrity crush. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: A Word To 21 From Cynical 30

Girl Talk: A Word To 21 From Cynical 30

You know those moments when your conscious mind separates from the body and you briefly become an observer of your own actions? You watch your lips move and hear yourself rambling on and on, lecturing your younger coworker about life. You’re horrified at how cynical you sound, but you can’t stop yourself. It is in that moment, watching yourself from the outside in, that you realize you have become a jaded thirtysomething. Do you know that moment? No? Allow me to elaborate.

I was talking to a 21-year-old coworker of mine. A sweet, hopeful, hardworking, lovely young gem of a person. He had overheard me discussing a friend’s failed marriage and seemed confused. I tried to explain to him that marriage was a wonderful thing, but it can also be, well, difficult. “I’m excited to get older and get married,” he said. “Life gets easier when you’re older.” My head spun on him like I was in “The Exorcist.” “WHAT?” I snorted, “Are you kidding me? Life just gets harder.”

His eyes widened. “No…” he argued, “it gets easier.”

“No, you’re wrong.” I pressed, and as I continued to explain the onerous nature of life, my tone becoming more insistent, I realized I wasn’t talking to my coworker anymore. I was talking to myself. Specifically, my idealistic 21-year-old self. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: 5 Red Flags That Told Me To Leave

On Abused Women
Facts about why abused women stay with their abusers. Read More »
Spot A Narcissist
narcissist-060714
Four ways to spot a narcissist before he becomes your boyfriend. Read More »
No Respect Warning Signs
abusive relationship
Eight warning signs a partner does not respect you. Read More »

He seemed sweet at first. In fact, he had many sweet moments. But then there was the other stuff …

Abusive behavior isn’t as simple as we, as a society, want it to be. We often think that the kinds of signs that tell you a man could be abusive are very obvious. We imagine monsters, overtly misogynist thugs. We think of extreme physical violence as being the key – or the only – signifier. But often the violence doesn’t start until a relationship is already established – sometimes not until after a woman has moved in with her boyfriend, marries him, or becomes pregnant. In fact, the leading cause of death in pregnant women is domestic homicide, which is to say they are killed by their intimate partners. If we limit our understanding of abusive behavior to physical violence, we risk ignoring other red flags we should be heeding. Keep reading »

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