Tag Archives: gender

12 Reasons Why Women Don’t Listen To Men

Psychologist Robert Leahy made a list of reasons why men don’t listen to women. Sure maybe he’s not listening to us because he want us to be rational rather than emotional, but it’s pretty likely that at that point, we’re not listening to him either. While this list is an interesting look at why communication breaks down between the sexes from the male perspective, we thought it would only be fair to make a list of reasons why women tune men out. Check them out after the jump. Why do you stop listening? Share in the comments. Keep reading »

Poll: How Do You Respond To Cat-Calling?

How Do You Respond To Cat-Calling?

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Should We Forget About Equality In The Workplace And Just Marry Rich?

A new report published in Europe found that 40 years of reform to promote gender equality in the workplace may have been all for naught. As much as it’s become politically incorrect to admit, the stats show that the majority of women would rather find a rich man to marry than have a successful career. Keep reading »

What Is The Evangelical “Stay-At-Home Daughters Movement”?

Weeks ago, we met the evangelical housewives who submit to their husbands. Now let’s meet the evangelical “stay-at-home daughters” — young women who forgo higher education and a career to stay close to their fathers and learn how to be a good homemaker and helper before they are getting married.

Writing in Bitch Magazine, author Gina McGalliard explains how these young women claim all women are much happier submitting to a family-focused life, rather than getting their own careers and jobs. Whether the woman needs “special protection” from her husband or her father, it’s all part of the same “Christian patriarchy movement.” Keep reading »

NY Times Mag Profiles Evangelical Housewives Who Submit To Their Husbands

I am absolutely fascinated by people’s reasons for holding onto stiffly defined gender roles. For that reason, this weekend’s New York Times Magazine article, “Housewives of God,” was an absolute treat. Journalist Molly Worthen profiled Priscilla Shirer, an evangelical Bible teacher who has published numerous religious books and workbooks and accepts 20 out of 300 speaking engagements per year. She is also the mother of three young boys and depends on her husband, Jerry, to pick the kids up from school, do laundry and prepare dinner. As journalist Worthen put it, “Priscilla Shirer’s marriage appears to be just the sort of enlightened partnership that would make feminists cheer.”

But Jerry Shirer is the head of the Shirer household. All phone calls regarding Priscilla’s career and decisions — including what to name the couple’s youngest baby — go through him. Priscilla also sees herself not as a rah-rah-independent woman, but as a “complementarian”: She and her hubby both have separate, defined roles from their gender and are “complementary” to each other. Keep reading »

Ladies, You Don’t Want A Recommendation Letter To Call You “Kind”

Bad news, ladies: being described as “caring,” “sensitive,” “kind” or “nurturing” in a recommendation letter can work against you. According to research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, of 624 letters of recommendation submitted on behalf of 194 applicants for eight positions at a university, women are more likely to be described with stereotypically “feminine” adjectives by both male and female letter writers and they are less likely to get offered the job if tainted with these “feminine” descriptions. Researchers took the letters, removed identifying, gendered information, and controlled for things like papers published and honors received. The search committee rated the letters in which the subject was described as “feminine” the lowest for both men and women, but women’s letters of recommendation letters are where these descriptors were most likely to appear. What are some of the words more likely used to describe men? “Confident,” “aggressive,” “ambitious,” “independent,” and “daring.” According to Inside Higher Ed, scholars who analyzed the research said there are “clear patterns” of word choice in recommendation letters. Keep reading »

Do You Know A D-Lister Who Needs Reality TV Rehab?

Do you know some reality stars from TV who look like they could use a real-life kick in the pants? A “desperate bachelorette” maybe? A “d-bag”? An “angry black bitch”? These are just a few of the stock characters you see over and over again on reality TV — excuse me, “reality TV.” Media critic Jennifer L. Pozner — who just happens to be my mentor and friend — has just published Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV, which examines the past decade of “reality TV” and how its statements on race, gender and class just happen to echo cultural stereotypes. (For example, men and women of color were pretty much absent from “reality TV” until Flavor of Love — a “dating” show where women clean up after and perform sexual favors for the rapper Flavor Flav.) Keep reading »

The Difference Between What Men And Women Need (According To Google)

How on earth did we even try to understand the differences between the genders before Google Instant? Everything we could ever want to know about men vs. women can be illuminated by autocomplete. (For the record, Google, I also need to urinate. Too much Diet Coke today.) [via I Love Charts] Keep reading »

Trans Athlete Fights For The Right To Compete

The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) is in a bit of a bind right now—thanks to a set of policies which some believe discriminate against transgender athletes. Golfer Lana Lawless is suing the LPGA for its “female at birth” policy, which requires that all competitors must have been born biological females. Lawless, who was born male, had gender reassignment surgery in 2005 and was a high-ranking golfer in the Long Drivers of America organization. But then Long Drivers changed its gender policy to match the LPGA rendering Lawless ineligible for competition.

“It’s an issue of access and opportunity,” Lawless told The New York Times. “I’ve been shut out because of prejudice.” Keep reading »

Mommy Loves Her “Princess Boy” Who Likes To Wear Girls’ Clothes

This is the sweetest story: this little boy likes to wear princess clothes and that’s just fine with his mom. Cheryl Kilodavis has written a children’s book called My Princess Boy about how it’s OK for boys, like her son Dyson, to enjoy pretty dresses. It warms my dark, craggy heart. Some moms are the best. [My Princess Boy via Colorlines] Keep reading »

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