Tag Archives: fertilization

Making A Baby Is A Battle Between Warriors In “Sizing Up Sperm”

This Sunday at 9 p.m., National Geographic Channel turns the life story of sperm into a saga that looks as intense as “Gladiator.” In “Sizing Up Sperm,” humans represent the little guys on a mission to be the first to reach and fertilize an egg — you know how it works. The sperm must race not only one another but also time since 99 percent of the sperm will be goners within 30 minutes. The survivors fight to the death, with just one winner.

Not only will this program be dramatic and educational, but the visuals look amazing; A London skyscraper stands in for the testicle, and the Rockies become the female anatomy. It’s going to be epic. [National Geographic Channel] Keep reading »

Sperm Have To Be “Turned On” To Fertilize An Egg

A study published in the Journal of Proteome Research found that sperm can’t fertilize an egg immediately after entering the female reproductive tract. No, sperm are fickle little guys. An activation process scientists call “capacitation” has to take place in them. Basically, the cells in the sperm have to be “turned on” for them to do their deed. So, not only do you and your man have to be in the mood to make babies, but so do his male reproductive cells. Researchers are working on figuring out what gets sperm in the mood. [Medical News Today] Keep reading »

Grow Your Own Baby

It’s alive, it’s aliiiiiiive! German scientists have successful inseminated rats with Franken-sperm, the first lab grown man-juice. Genetics researchers at the University of Goettingen have developed fetuses through embryonic stem cells. Which means if they can transfer this technology to humans, getting pregnant could come self-contained in a chick’s package with no male necessary. While this process won’t give men a biological tie to the child, it could conceive one from two women, using the stem cells from one lady and the egg from the other. Amazing! The process is still a little shaky, as only 12 out of 65 mice eggs were actually fertilized, and of those, seven died within five months of birth. So, the docs are working out the kinks in the faux-sperm system and a team is even going to England to begin research with human stem cells, since Germany has laws preventing mad scientists from using people parts that way. Dr. Wolfgang Engel is hopeful and promises, “If it works in the mouse, I’m sure it will also work in the human.” [The Sydney Morning Herald]

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