Tag Archives: fertility

Natalie Portman’s Dad Pens A “Fertility Thriller”

Natalie Portman‘s dad has babies on the brain, and not just because his daughter is in the final trimester of her pregnancy. Dr. Avner Hershlag (Portman is Natalie’s stage name, FYI) just happens to be a big whig at the Center for Human Reproduction in Long Island and one of the nation’s leading reproductive specialists. But he also has a creative side, too. In fact, Avner is currently shopping his first novel to publishers. It’s called Misconception, and he has dubbed it a “fertility thriller.”

So what does that mean? Keep reading »

The Plight Of The NYC Single Woman

Some people come to New York City for work. Some people come to New York City for school. Some people are born in New York City and never end up leaving. But whatever your reason for being here, you probably ended up staying, in part, for one reason: options. On any given night there are thousands of different activities you could be doing and hundreds of them are free. If you don’t like your apartment, you can find a dozen illegal sublets on Craigslist in two hours. Want to gawk at a celebrity drinking her morning latte? Craving pizza handmade by an Italian grandpa who speaks no English? Need pot delivered to your apartment ASAP? Check, check and check. Hell, you’ll even find two three four different Starbucks in a three-block radius.

But maybe the BIg Apple has too many options. NYC single woman Jennifer Doll argues in The Village Voice — the city’s indie newspaper — this week that when it comes to settling down and getting married, no one in the dating game will make a decision because there are too many other options to choose from. Keep reading »

The Pill: Has It Made Our Lives Simpler Or More Complicated?

There’s no question that the birth control pill has given us modern women an undeniable amount of freedom that our grandmothers didn’t have — both sexual and cultural — since its introduction to the free market 50 years ago. But what it’s costing our generation is an increased likelihood of infertility, or so says New York magazine’s cover story this week, “Waking Up From The Pill.” While it’s not news to link the birth control pill to women waiting later in life to have children, and thus infertility, because of their diminished egg supplies as they age, writer Vanessa Grigoriadis does have a new perspective on why this is so. She claims it’s because taking the Pill makes women either forget altogether about their biology until it’s too late or to think of it as something controllable by modern medicine.

“For women who have spent so much of their lives pressing the off button on their bodies while on the Pill, it’s upsetting to learn that there’s no magic pill that causes instant impregnation,” she writes. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Everyone’s Knocked Up – But Me!

It was like the post-WWII baby boom at my publishing company in Manhattan. The ladies’ room was full of women patting their stomachs, complaining about morning sickness that lasted all day and chugging Cheerios to battle nausea. I had never seen anything like it at any place I’ve ever worked. At my last job, many of the women were older and had never been married, and when I worked in sports, somehow a job was eliminated once a woman uttered, “I’m expecting.” Keep reading »

Fertility Expert Says 20-Something Women Should Freeze Their Ovaries

When it comes to baby-craving, I am a complete lady cliché. I remark that my own ovaries are rotting between bites of huevos rancheros at brunch. I joke about having a back-up plan that involves “accidentally” getting knocked up by someone handsome, successful, and smart. Just this morning, I got an email from a pregnant friend, who is due any day now, telling me she was having minor contractions and I got teary-eyed. So, when I read the headline “Women ‘should freeze ovaries in their twenties’,” I felt the urge to mentally flagellate myself for being nearly 31 with only Trader Joe’s mac ‘n’ cheese in my freezer. Fertility scare tactics work like a charm on me. But not this one! Keep reading »

I Only Have 12 Percent Of My Eggs Left?

I think about babies a lot. Big, fat tears rolled down my cheeks while watching Kourtney Kardashian give birth on Sunday’s episode of “Keeping Up with the Kardashians.” I secretly and selfishly hope my pregnant friend’s baby daddy will chicken out of being in the delivery room and I’ll get to be there with her. I’ve already offered to babysit, oh, constantly. I’ll be deep in conversation with someone and a baby will cross my path and it’s like I’ve suddenly found myself in high altitude because my hearing is muted — I’ve got baby tunnel vision. Needless to say, I am a terrible date at a family-friendly restaurant.

So every time I see a headline like this one, I get a little … discouraged: “Ovaries have not adjusted to many women’s decision to delay having children.” According to the article in yesterday’s Washington Post, a study conducted by the University of St. Andrews and Edinburgh University shows that women lose 90 percent of their eggs by age 30. I turned 30 in November. Researchers studied the “human ovarian reserve from conception through menopause” and using the data of 325 women, they did some math and concluded that the average woman is born with approximately 300,000 eggs and “steadily loses them as she ages, with just 12 percent of those eggs remaining at the age of 30, and only 3 percent left by 40.” Keep reading »

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