Tag Archives: female writers

The 10 Best Pieces Of “Pink Journalism” I’ve Read This Year

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When the ASME (American Society of Magazine Editors) awards for magazine journalism were listed online, the blogopshere took a quick whiff and reported back with the precise recipe for becoming award-winning journalist: Oh, testosterone. No women were nominated in profiles, features, reporting, essays or columns– the most prestigious categories.

What this sparked was a discussion about the gender byline gap and how the award-winning magazines like The New Yorker and Harpers don’t publish as many stories by women because they don’t pitch them. People pointed out that often, women stick to the “pink ghetto” of women’s magazines (and websites) and write about “pink” topics that are, apparently, undeserving of acclaim.

I am here to reclaim the term, “pink journalism.” I happen to love stories about women, relationships, sexuality, lifestyle, reproductive health, personal essays — all of which are considered “pink”and, I think, wildly important. That said, after the jump are some of the best “pink” pieces I’ve read recently, with comments from some of my favorite ‘”pink” writers. This is in no way a complete list, just a few favorites. And feel free to add your recommendations in the commets.   Keep reading »

In Defense Of Chick Lit

Jennifer Egan is one of my favorite authors of all time. I devour her books, care about her characters, and recommend her novels to anyone looking for a good, meaty read. I was thrilled that her latest, A Visit from the Goon Squad, a novel about the ravages of time on characters working in the music industry (to distill it way, way down) got so much attention from publications like The New York Times Book Review this past year. And when a buddy of mine sent me a link via IM to a Wall Street Journal story yesterday about Egan winning the Pulitzer Prize for the book, I was so happy for her — and for women writers everywhere. But then I scrolled down to the end of the story. Keep reading »

A Code Of Conduct For Women Who Write About Their Lovers?

It’s pretty remarkable that after the success of the blog Diary of a London Call Girl, and its subsequent book deal and TV series, “Belle,” the writer behind it, managed to remain anonymous until this morning. So why did cancer researcher Brooke Magnanti decide to out herself now? Because an ex she’d written about extensively was threatening to do it for her. While Magnanti gave the scoop to the Times of London, it was the Daily Mail who tracked down this boyfriend to find out how he feels about all of this. He’s frightened and furious. Keep reading »

The Inner Workings Of Cults, As Described By Women

When novelist Clara Salaman was young, her parents forced her to be part of a weird, religious “organization” that dominated every aspect of her life. Women weren’t allowed to wear skirts or makeup, and television, magazines, most books, and pop culture in all forms were also forbidden. Luckily, she never had to drink any mysterious Kool-Aid. While Salaman isn’t bitter, she recognizes that her experience in this cult, which she broke from as a teen, profoundly influenced her life. On August 6, her thriller “Shame On You” comes out, and it’s based on her cult experience. After the jump, more women who’ve lived to tell the tale. [Guardian UK] Keep reading »

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