Tag Archives: etiquette

Do You Believe In A Birthday Greeting Hierarchy?

Way back in the stone age when I was a kid, there were only a handful of popular ways you could wish someone a happy birthday. There was the face-to-face method. There was the tried and true phone call. And there was the always-thoughtful greeting card. These days, with email, text messaging, e-cards, and social networking, our options are a little more extensive, which begs the question: What’s the appropriate hierarchy of birthday greetings (or, perhaps it begs another question: Why does everything have to be so complicated?)? Keep reading »

Money 101: 10 Financial Etiquette Questions Answered!

Around the same time I started raking in the big bucks (courtesy of the Tooth Fairy), my father started enforcing the rule that the topic of money was off-limits in polite conversation. There was no, “Hey, how much was your incisor worth?” in my house. And the one time I asked my dad the amount of the bill at a restaurant, he handed it to me since he assumed I was offering to pay. I never asked again. Keep reading »

Arizona Teacher Makes Chivalry A Classroom Rule

chivalry photo

Teacher Cord Ivanyi, a Latin instructor at Gilbert Classical Academy, was tired of seeing boys physically push aside girls as they rushed through the classroom door. So at the beginning of this school year, Ivanyi told his students the new classroom rules about chivalry: boys would hold doors for girls; boys would ask girls if they would like to be seated; boys would offer to take girls’ backpacks before they sit down; boys would stand if a girl leaves the room; and girls would be served first if food is in the classroom.

“All boys will understand chivalry,” Ivanyi told The Arizona Republic. “It’s teaching them social grace. It’s things they should know when they do go out on dates.” All the students, boys and girls, were reportedly awkward about the mandated chivalry at first. But Ivanyi, as well as girls quoted by various media outlets, say girls seem to be enjoying the chivalry and some chivalrous behavior is even extending beyond the classroom.

Mandated chivalry may be a well-intentioned idea. And it may well have taught some kids to be conscious of the basic concept of good manners, which is to be considerate of others’ well-being. But mandating chivalry in the classroom could not be a more misguided set of rules. Keep reading »

Relationship Q: How Long Before You Drop A Deuce?

New relationships are all about keeping up the lie. “I don’t have any flaws. And I most certainly do not poop!” Right? It’s amazing how long one can go pretending their no-no factory never pumps out any by-products. But oh, the truth will set you free. So we asked our Frisky BFFs, guys and gals: How long do you wait before unleashing the beast while hanging out with a new sexytime friend? Keep reading »

Why You Should Always Ask A Woman To Reveal Her Age

Today is my birthday. I’m 26 years old today — but I look much younger. With my big, brown eyes and round cheeks, people who don’t know me often mistake me for being in my early 20s or even in my teens. (It probably doesn’t help matters that my maturity hovers around the “Yo Gabba Gabba!” level at times.) Looking younger than my actual age is both a blessing and a curse. It is difficult, as a young-looking woman, to be taken seriously by older people when I discuss politics, society or culture. I’m not going to complain about being told that I “look so young,” though, when the latter is meant as a compliment. Who doesn’t enjoy compliments?

But I’ll admit I feel weird accepting those compliments sometimes. Why should I be flattered that I look young? Keep reading »

Why You Should Ask A Woman To Reveal Her True Age

Dear Wendy: “Will My Brother’s Obnoxious Fiancée Ruin My Graduation Party?

I’m graduating from college in June. I’ve had a lot of setbacks and ups and downs that I had to deal with in order to get to where I am now, so I’m planning a party to celebrate my accomplishment. The problem is I do not want my older brother’s fiancée to attend. We do not get along and have a mutual understanding to keep out of each other’s way. The times that we do have to be around each other she always has something negative to say or a backhanded comment; and I just don’t want to be around that at my party. I have tried being nice to her, but after she insulted our mother and disrespected me, I’ve given up on that route. She has constantly manipulated my brother into canceling plans that he and I have, causing us not to be as close as we once were (we barely talk now). I have a feeling that she’ll want to come just to make a good impression on our family (which has nothing to do with me or my party). As I prepare to send out invitations, I was wondering if I should just invite my brother (even though we aren’t very close) or should I invite him and his fiancée? If I just invite my brother; how can I tell him and/or her that I would rather she not come? I should also mention that the party I’m planning is a small one with just close friends and family, and since she is neither (yet) I do not feel the need to invite her. — Drama Free Party Planner

Keep reading »

Dear Wendy: “Is It Normal To Stop Wanting To Spend Every Second With My Boyfriend?”

My boyfriend and I have been dating for almost six months. He goes to school in Rhode Island and comes home to New Hampshire every weekend. So I always keep my weekends free and make plans with him around my work schedule and his. I guess we’ve kind of been in that stage where we want to spend all our time together and seeing as how that’s only on the weekends I feel like its been amplified. This coming weekend I’m going on a day trip with my best friend and our moms. I thought we could do something Friday night too (best friend and I) and I got excited because it’s been awhile since we’ve made plans. Then I remembered that I spend my weekends with my boyfriend and I felt bad. I guess what I want to know, is it normal for the wanting to be together every second feeling to ebb out? — Honeymoon Stage

Keep reading »

How To Tactfully Hit On A Cute Guy At Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving is a time to spend with family and friends. Sometimes this family event may have an unexpected guest: a cute, single guy. When such a treat comes your way, seize the moment in a feminine, ladylike fashion.

Seating. Right away, you will want to be seated next to this hottie; however, this is a bad idea. A major part of flirting is conversation and body language. Both of these are difficult to display if you’re sitting side by side. Try positioning yourself across from him for the best effect.

Introductions. If introductions have not been made before reaching the table, take this as an opportunity to place yourself on his radar. Before you take your seat, introduce yourself and offer him your hand to shake. When he shakes your hand, hold his gaze and smile. You should disengage from the handshake first so you don’t come on too strong (a girl who won’t let go is creepy). Glance down as you take your seat, then back up again at him with a slight smile on your lips and in your eyes. Keep reading »

How Do You Expect Your Family And Friends To Treat Your Ex?

When you break up with someone, how do you expect the people in your life to treat your ex? This Sunday’s “Modern Love” column in The New York Times explored that topic in an essay by Charles Antin. Antin had an amicable, cold-turkey breakup with his girlfriend of five years, and then found himself morosely following her life in the aftermath via Facebook. When his “technophile” grandfather joined the social networking site and befriended his ex — because of their shared love of Frangelico, it seems — Antin was angry. The column ends with a bit of a whimper — Antin confronted his grandfather, who ended up quitting Facebook entirely — but it got me thinking about how we expect our family members and friends to treat our exes, and how we expect their family and friends to treat us, whether the breakup was amicable or not. Keep reading »

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