Tag Archives: elle

Katie Holmes’ Elle Cover Boasts Her Now-Cancelled Miniseries

Katie Holmes graces the cover of February’s Elle magazine, alongside the cover line, “On Tom, Suri, and coming back to TV—as Jackie O.” Only, as we reported yesterday, Katie’s miniseries “The Kennedys” has been indefinitely shelved by The History Channel. That’s a little awkward. [PopWrap] Keep reading »

One Dress, 3 Covers, Big Drama

Miu Miu has some explaining to do. Somehow, the exact same dress from the Fall 2010 runway just appeared on the three different magazine covers, meaning the editors at British Vogue, British Elle, AND W are none too pleased! Now technically, there are a few variations in the design: while the colors are different, the style is the same, but the coincidence is making editors and PR girls squirm. Here’s the breakdown: Eva Mendes graces the July 2010 issue of W in a yellow version of the Fall 2010 design, Freja Beha Erichsen dons a tangerine style for the August 2010 issue of British Vogue, and Lily Allen sports a lilac variate for the cover of British Elle. The interesting thing is, public relations offices work very hard so that this situation never occurs, taking great care to send different options to magazines. Somehow either the system broke down or editors just were beyond obsessed with this one dress; one thing’s for sure — this dress is going to sell out in no time. [Guardian] Keep reading »

Where Does The Word “Sneakers” Come From?

I came across a little tidbit in the “Hot Contents” section of Elle‘s July issue that said advertising man Henry Nelson McKinney popularized the term “sneakers” while working on a 1917 Keds campaign. The athletic shoes, as Keds were known before this clever moment, had a rubber sole that allowed the wearer to sneak behind unsuspecting friends and family. But as it turns out, the word “sneakers” was in use way before this time. Boys, who were known to harass their schoolmasters, called their tennis shoes “sneakers” as early as 1887, according to a New York Times article at the time that cited The Boston Journal of Education. In addition, the former Jordan Marsh department store in Boston advertised “500 pairs of men’s tennis oxfords (sneakers)” in 1889. Keds maintains that it was the first to prominently use “sneakers,” but according to its own library, there were only two passing uses of the term in ads from the early part of the 20th century — in 1922 and 1934. So I guess we have naughty little Bostonian boys to thank for the term that gave birth to the sneaker head. [NY Times] Keep reading »

Rihanna Has A Big Head On The Cover Of Elle

If Rihanna‘s head was really as big as it is on the cover of the July issue of Elle, it would fall off. [Elle] Keep reading »

Kristen Stewart’s British Elle Cover Looks Ripped From The Late ’90s

Is it just us or does Kristen Stewart‘s upcoming Elle U.K. cover look like it features a “Friends” cast member? The magazine says the simple hair and makeup were an attempt to keep in touch with Stewart’s “enviably effortless style,” but we think she looks distinctly unlike herself and a little too much like a Rachel or Monica wannabe. In fact, pull out those hair pins and you’re a few blond highlights away from a full-blown Rachel cut. It’s not that we don’t appreciate Rachel’s contribution to ’90s hair, we’re just not sure why Elle thought Kristen Stewart should channel it while wearing a red cable-knit sweater. This girl makes out with vampires and werewolves, not Ross or Chandler. Keep reading »

Do You Want To See Average-Looking Women In Magazines And Movies?

Elle editor-in-chief Robbie Myers went on “Today” this morning to talk about body types and how curvier models are getting more attention in the fashion industry these days, with more womanly figures walking the runways at Louis Vuitton, Prada, and more. She said, however, that women reading magazines or watching movies don’t want to see bodies like their own in the media; while we don’t want to see anorexic models, we “respond more to women who are a little bit above average. … Seeing someone who looks like [the average woman] doesn’t actually send her out and make her want to go shopping.” We’re gonna guess that Elle won’t be jumping on the plus-size model bandwagon anytime soon. [MSNBC] Keep reading »

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