Tag Archives: eating disorders

12 Celebs Who Battled Eating Disorders

Katie Couric revealed last week that she struggled with bulimia in her early 20s—and sadly, she’s far from the only celebrity to have battled an eating disorder. The Huffington Post rounds up a dozen:

  • Jessica Alba: She once said that she had trouble adjusting to “a woman’s body with natural fat in places.” “I freaked out,” she said, and her obsession turned into an eating disorder.
  • Katharine McPhee: The American Idol and Smash star revealed that she struggled with bulimia for five years—and that it almost destroyed her vocal chords. Read more…

The Soapbox: In Response To Lady Gaga And Her Proposed “Body Revolution”

Gaga On The Pope
She says his view on homosexuality doesn't matter. Read More »
Lady Gaga/Leigh Bowery
The singer learned everything she knows from Leigh Bowery. Read More »

I have vilified Lady Gaga in the past (to much condemnation, given her rabid fanbase): the contrived, weird-for-attention shtick really wears on me, particularly considering it comes hand-in-hand with what basically amounts to catchy, radio-friendly pop music with a pseudo-controversial religious message here and there. I can live with her message of peace, love, and acceptance, but that isn’t enough to make a fan out of me. Here’s what is: in defense of her recent 25-pound weight gain and the ensuing media scrutiny, Gaga gets naked, or at least stripped to her skivvies, to set the “Body Revolution” in motion. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: A Reluctant Defense Of Pro-Ana Blogs

Pro-Ana Shirts Banned
The Kate Moss-inspired shirts pulled from shelves. Read More »
Body Dysmorphic Disorder
One woman's experience battling this disorder. Read More »
Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »

This piece was originally published on xoJane.com.

A new study into the hoary underworld of pro-anorexia bloggers has discovered the unexpected: pro-ana communities may not exclusively be the dark pits of self-destruction they are typically assumed to be. The survey, conducted by researchers from Indiana University, suggests rather candidly that pro-ana communities may provide better support than traditional eating disorder treatments, and that said communities even continue to provide assistance to those who have decided to begin recovery.  Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I’m A Binge Eater (Sometimes)

Secret Eating
One writer talks about being a secret eater. Read More »
Secret Single Behavior
The 20 things we're kind of ashamed that we do when we're alone. Read More »
Body Dysmorphic Disorder
One woman's experience battling this disorder. Read More »

A few weeks ago, I was sitting at my boyfriend’s living room table, alone, in the middle of a weekday afternoon, my laptop open, trying to fend off both a cold and a bad mood. I was frustrated that I couldn’t pick amongst the multiple documents I had open that required my urgent attention, and angry at myself for feeling tired and frustrated, a vicious cycle of inertia and self-hatred. Rationally, I know that I’m lucky to be able to be my own boss and make my own schedule, so when I fall down on the job, I get upset. I was also antsy because I was in suburbia; I live in New York City, and right outside my door, within a one-block walk, are a bagel shop, a diner, three 24-hour delis, a nail salon, a dry cleaner and more. Where he lives, I can walk for coffee in just five minutes, but I’m pretty much the only one walking. I felt trapped, and stressed, and cranky, and turned to something I thought would soothe those feelings: food. Keep reading »

The Soapbox: In Response To Vogue Editor’s Speech On Eating Disorders

Overcoming E.D.
bulimia photo
A woman explains how she overcame her eating disorder. Read More »
Snarking On Angie
Why we should stop snarking on Angelina Jolie's thinness. Read More »
Weight Talk
One writer is sick of talking to women about weight. Read More »

Franca Sozzani excels at many things. She is the long-standing editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia and, in 1994, she was even made the editor-in-chief of Condé Nast Italia in its entirety. She is acknowledged as a contemporary and collaborator to, among others, Steven Meisel, Bruce Weber, Peter Lindbergh, and Paolo Roversi, unarguably the most influential fashion photographers of the past two decades. She is credited as the driving force, alongside Meisel, behind the groundbreaking “supermodel” movement in the ’90s. Last year, she launched Vogue Curvy, a branch of the magazine’s Italian edition geared towards plus-sized women. Sozzani has accomplished a great variety of things, but despite her apparent devotion to targeting her publication towards a medley of body shapes and sizes, she herself champions thinness. It’s a true study in contradiction: she encourages others to appropriate acceptance of all body types, but at the bottom line, the girls that land the coveted cover of her magazine — not to mention Sozzani herself — are built like greyhounds.

Which brings me to my point: Vogue Italia has a history, more so than any other Vogue publication, of promoting the emaciated look, so why, in the name of all that is good and holy (which is nothing, these days), did Franca Sozzani, notorious for her use of strikingly thin models, give a speech about anorexia, obesity, and body image at Harvard?

Keep reading »

Pinterest Bans Pro-Anorexia And Thinsporation Material

Calvin On Kate Moss
He hired her for her "natural, always thin" look. Eek. Read More »
Pro-Ana Shirts Banned
The Kate Moss-inspired shirts pulled from shelves. Read More »
Is Pinterest Being Shady?
Here's how Pinterest makes money. Read More »

Our favorite new Internet timewaster, Pinterest has in recent weeks become a haven for online pro-anorexia and eating disorder communities. Drawn to the site’s image-heavy, community-oriented style, thinsporation posters have recently flooded the site, posting pictures of jutting hips, emaciated models and concave bellies, emblazoned with pro-ana slogans like “nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.” And, most importantly, Pinterest posters can post anonymously, meaning that users can reach out to one another but still feel safe.

But all of that is about to change.

Keep reading »

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