Tag Archives: eating disorders

Kickass Woman Of The Day: Dr. Drew’s Daughter Paulina Pinsky Is A Body Positivity Activist

Kickass-Woman-Of-The-Day--Dr.-Drew's-Daughter-Paulina-Pinsky-Is-A-Body-Positivity-Warrior

Dr. Drew Pinsky’s daughter, Paulina Pinsky, first came out about her seven-year struggle with anorexia and bulimia in a brave essay she penned for the Columbia Daily Spectator in November 2013. The 21-year-old junior at Barnard College described the moment she revealed her secret to her mom in her essay “Get Your Teeth Checked.” She wrote:

I paused, but before I knew it, the words were out of my mouth … “I’ve been throwing up since the seventh grade.” … [T]he words flew out of my mouth before I had a chance to take them back. The following moment was the longest and most painful silence of my life; I felt like my stomach was going to fall out and that I was going to projectile-vomit onto the windshield. After a silence that lasted far too long, [my mom] responded. “Well, get your teeth checked.”

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5 Ways To Be Good To Your Loved One With An Eating Disorder

Some say that love can conquer all. But a couple struggling with the effects of the pressures of an eating disorder may need a little outside help. Though eating disorders are more frequently reported in women than in men, they occur among both genders. The most commonly seen are anorexia (starvation) and bulimia (binge eating and purging food). Read more at Your Tango…

The Myth Of The Eating Actress — And Why It’s Dangerous For Women

My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
Jennnifer Lawrence Eats!
She loves cheesesteaks. Read More »
Eating And Dating
If you love me, you'll have to love my weird eating habits. Read More »
the myth of the eating actress

Garance Doré is a fashion illustrator, and the wife of Sartorialist photographer Scott Schulman. She’ s also a style blogger with a loyal following, loved for her honest and rambling posts about all things fashion. Earlier this week, Dore posted an entry called “The Other Girls,” where she talked about the major disconnect between what actresses look like and what they supposedly eat on TV and in interviews.

The essay was prompted by comments she received after posting a video of her friends eating lunch one day. In the video, Dore and her friends abstain from eating dessert, and some of her readers took that to mean that they were depriving themselves to stay thin, accusing Doré of offering a twisted “image of femininity.”

But, argued Doré, she was only showing what her concept of reality is — the way it is for so many women for whom eating a huge slice of cheesecake or gorging on a basket of fries means hours and hours in the gym. Keep reading »

Study: Anorexia Is Similar To Autism

My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
Dating Man With Autism
Dating a man with autism taught me to be myself. Read More »
Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »
Karl On Anorexia
He thinks the fashion industry has nothing to do with it. Read More »
anorexia and autism

A new study suggests that girls suffering from anorexia display similar personality traits to those with autism, such as lack of empathy, high focus on detail, and rigid behavior. In some instances, girls with anorexia scored five times higher in autistic qualities than non-anorexic girls on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Keep reading »

Feminists Have Food And Body Image Issues, Too: 5 Ways To Get Over The Shame

Feminist Blogger's ED
Chloe Angyal
Feministing blogger Chloe Angyal reveals eating disorder, apologizes. Read More »
I Don't Know My Weight
scale
The case of stepping off the scale. Read More »
Feminist Joins WW
Is the diet industry compatible with feminist beliefs? Read More »
feminists eating disorders

I was a full-blown feminist by the time I started college. I also had a full-blown eating disorder. As a teen I marched on Washington for women’s rights. I put out a zine called Wonder Woman. I played drums (and by “played” I mean I aggressively and skill-lessly beat the shit out of a floor tom, a snare and a cymbal) in a punk band whose songs included “Penis-Shaped Missile” and “Cute Band Alert.” I prepared all varieties of soy-based hippie stews for Food Not Bombs, though I don’t recall ever sampling any of them. And it wasn’t because of the soy. Or the hippie. While my dog-eared copy of Naomi Wolf’s The Beauty Myth was proudly displayed on my bookshelf, my equally well-worn calorie counter book was hidden out of sight in my desk drawer.

I was terrified of gaining weight. I restricted. I binged and purged. I hated my body. Keep reading »

This Creepy Real-Life Barbie Infographic Makes The Doll Ideal Very Unappealing

In case you had somehow forgotten just how bizarre and unrealistic the Barbie ideal actually is, this new infographic makes the whole crazy thing very, very clear. Check out all of the statistics at the source. [The Fashion Spot via Rehabs.com]

Barbie Without Makeup
A "real girl," just like you and me! Read More »
Black Barbie Party Line
black barbie
A mom appeals to Mattel to make party supplies featuring a Black Barbie. Read More »

Absolutely Terrible: Modeling Agencies Are Stalking Eating Disorder Clinics For New Models Now

My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »
Too Young Models?
Is the problem with too-thin model or too-young girls? Read More »

Because skinny is more important than healthy, some modeling scouts in Sweden have taken to hanging around outside of eating disorder clinics to find new models. Yes, I’ll say that again: modeling scouts are approaching girls — some of them too weak to stand — at the Stockholm Center for Eating Disorders and offering them modeling contracts. Dr. Anna-Maria af Sandeberg, who helps run the clinic, said the scouts are “repugnant” and send the “wrong signals when the girls are being treated for eating disorders.” Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Confessions Of A Thin-Privileged Fat Activist

Feminist Joins WW
Is the diet industry compatible with feminist beliefs? Read More »
Mirror Mirror: Thin Women
Why thin women shouldn't be excluded from talking about body image. Read More »
Fat Girls Are Best Friends
fat girl
Why do some men refuse to date their fat best friends? Read More »
My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
thin fat activist

Once upon a time — before URLs, handles, likes and shares — I put some good old-fashioned postage stamps inside an envelope and sent away for a zine (made of actual paper!) that was filled with some very big ideas. I was 16 and the zine was called i’m so fucking beautiful, a title that hooked me instantly because at the time I was quite literally starving myself of that sentiment. I was all punk rock by day, but I had a couple of dirty secrets that did not exactly jibe with the Manic Panic and combat boots:

  1. I thought calories were evil. Unfortunately this didn’t stop me from willingly and regularly consuming wretched diet foods that were almost certainly concocted in the bowels of hell. Listen, when a chocolate product in a plastic tub includes instructions on how it can be enjoyed frozen as “ice cream” or microwaved into a “shake,” it no longer qualifies as food, okay? But I ate (and drank!) that sugar-free, chemical-laden kryptonite sludge like it was my duty, each scoop and sip meticulously tallied in my Calories and Fat Grams Journal, which was really more of a disturbing collection of numbers and equations scribbled on Post-Its and scrap paper than an actual journal. Think “A Beautiful Mind” for the eating disordered set.
  2. I kept a stash of “thinspiration” featuring pictures of models I tore from magazines (‘90s-style! Old school!). I wanted to be that kind of beautiful. And the more I stared at those images, the more fervently I started to believe in that waifish brand of perfection. So I made myself sick chasing sizes that were smaller than the small sizes I already wore. I developed a mortal fear of weight gain. And while my weight fluctuated up and down and back up again as I abused it with brutal cycles of starvation, bingeing, and purging, I was never anywhere remotely close to being plus-sized, full-figured, curvy or any other palatable euphemism for that oh-so-terrifying F-word.

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Alexa Chung On Body Image & How Naturally Thin Girls Can’t Win Either

Gaga's Body Revolution
Gaga starts an important conversation about body image. Read More »
Fat News Anchor
Wisconsin news anchor responds to fat shamer's bullying letter. Read More »
Open Letter
Winona pens an open letter to the fat girl. Read More »
Ugly Duckling Lessons
Life lessons from a former ugly duckling. Read More »

“I think it’s about time people stopped judging women on their appearance and more on their intellect. Like you can appreciate my style without having to appreciate my weight. It’s not actually mutually inclusive. I just get frustrated because, just because I exist in this shape, doesn’t mean that I’m like advocating it and being like, ‘I look great.’ How do you know I’m not looking in the mirror and going ‘I wish I could gain ten pounds?’ Which is actually quite often the case. But if you say that you sound like you’re bragging that you’re naturally thin, and you’re not allowed to do that because even though it’s not the ideal weight, it kind of is as well. So it’s really fucked up. And how people that are bigger can be on the front covers of magazines being like ‘I’m really happy with my shape.’ But if I was to do that, I’d be compeltely criticized and ridiculed. But why can’t I be happy with how I look? …  I’m just a bit sick of it. I just think that whole culture of hatred, and also feeling like it’s your right to judge people when you don’t know them is really fucked up.”

– This is Alexa Chung talking to Fashionista about the controversy that erupted awhile back when she posted a picture of herself looking quite thin on Instagram. Chung was derided by commenters on the site for being “thinspiration” for women with eating disorders. The whole interview is quite good and I recommend you read the entire thing. She says some very smart things about how naturally thin and skinny women are not immune to body scrutiny and, while it doesn’t compare equally to larger-sized women, it’s still body-policing. As a naturally skinny person, Chung is on the receiving end of insinuations and comments that she must have an eating disorder. Larger women can’t win and skinnier women can’t win, either. Alexa is right: it’s time we stopped judging all women on their appearance.  [Fashionista]

12 Celebs Who Battled Eating Disorders

Katie Couric revealed last week that she struggled with bulimia in her early 20s—and sadly, she’s far from the only celebrity to have battled an eating disorder. The Huffington Post rounds up a dozen:

  • Jessica Alba: She once said that she had trouble adjusting to “a woman’s body with natural fat in places.” “I freaked out,” she said, and her obsession turned into an eating disorder.
  • Katharine McPhee: The American Idol and Smash star revealed that she struggled with bulimia for five years—and that it almost destroyed her vocal chords. Read more…
  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

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