Tag Archives: depression

Girl Talk: I Dated A Psychotherapist

If you had brain cancer, would you date a neurologist? Would you sleep with a chiropractor to ease your chronic back pain? Around my twentieth birthday, I was hit with a sudden onset of crippling depression and anxiety. After two years, several doctors and a veritable rainbow of colored mood-altering capsules, I still felt hopeless. With no cure in sight, I fell for a psychotherapist. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I’m On Anti-Depressants

I was standing in front of a table lamp display in Crate & Barrel when I decided maybe I needed to be on psychiatric medicine. I had been alternating between staring at the display and wandering around the store helplessly for the last two and a half hours and was no closer to making a decision on what table lamp I was going to buy than I had been when I walked in. My heart was beating fast, my mind was racing, and I simply could not concentrate on making what should have been a very simple decision. I was thisclose to a full-blown panic attack. Instead, I walked out of the store, went home empty-handed, and told my therapist that Tuesday that I needed a referral for a psychiatrist. I seriously could not take this s**t anymore. Keep reading »

People Are Talking About Amanda Seyfried’s Pill-Popping

In the new issue of Esquire, Amanda Seyfried not only gabs about her new “spinach and seed”-eating diet, she also scandalously pops pills in front of the interviewer! A birth control pill and the anti-anxiety med Lexapro, that is. Here’s how it’s described in the story:

The anxiety rises in her as she speaks, and she cracks open her purse, shakes a Lexapro into her hand. She halves it, then pops a birth-control pill from its foil pack and swallows both. “Yeah, yeah, I’m anxious,” she says. “And yes, I use birth control.”

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Does The Internet Depress You?

Since you’re reading The Frisky right now, I hope that means you’re a fan of the site. But it may also mean you could be depressed. Researchers have discovered that the more time people spend on the internet, the more depressed they are. Yes, even if they happen to be spending their time on cool sites like this one. Researchers questioned 1,319 people, ages 16 to 51, and discovered a high correlation between amount of time spent online and depression. In fact, among what the researchers characterized as “internet addicts,” the “average depression score was more than five times higher than that of non-addicted users.” Keep reading »

Is Freedom Of Choice Making You Unhappy?

Freedom of choice is a by-product of modern life, and with more choice comes misery, claims a new study. Having to make choices like what foods we eat, which movies we rent, or where we vacation cripples middle-class Americans with indecision and makes us unhappy, according to this study conducted by Stanford University. The depressed feelings can grow out of uncertainty or regret for the choices we’ve made. Basically, too much variety is a bad thing because we become obsessed about what our decisions say about us. Then, we worry whether we’ve made the right choice. And it gets worse. We’re not only miserably dissatisfied, but we’re also selfish and lack empathy because we’re so darn focused on ourselves. Hmm, maybe it’s time to go back to hunting and gathering. Have you been crippled by your abundance of choices? [Impact Lab] Keep reading »

How Do You Chase The Winter Blues?

It’s around this time of year that things just start to feel heavy. No one wants to go out. The social season hits a lull. The novelty of snow has gone from being charming to irritating. Your flights are delayed. Your skin is dry. Your pipes are frozen. Life. Sucks. And if you tell me to go to Sharper Image to get myself a light therapy box, I will slap you.

We know there’s not a lot to do to get around winter (save for moving to a tropical climate) and most of the ideas people start throwing around this time of year is stuff you know you won’t do or something so corny (like putting up a picture of a beach in your cubicle), it wouldn’t even fool a 5-year-old. So here are some of our slightly less conventional ideas to get out of that seasonal funk. Share your own in the comments below. Keep reading »

Are Happy Pills As Happy As They Sound?

Last week a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association claimed that people with mild to moderate depression are wasting their time with happy pills because the most commonly prescribed antidepressants are about as effective as placebos. But before you throw away your bottle, you should know this study wasn’t perfect—a New York Times article and many doctors say it doesn’t stand up to the mountain of evidence claiming that happy pills are, in fact, effective. Keep reading »

Feeling Down? Perhaps You Just Have The “Avatar” Blues

There are certain things sure to send one reeling into a pit of depression—getting laid off from a job, the death of a friend or family member, a particularly wrenching breakup, seeing the movie “Avatar.” No, that is not a typo, my friends. After watching “Avatar,” people are actually reporting feeling depressed because the gorgeous world of the movie is such a far cry from what we have here on earth, and they’re heading to fan message boards like Avatar Forums and Naviblue to lend each other support. One poster wrote on the latter, “Ever since I went to see ‘Avatar’ I have been depressed. Watching the wonderful world of Pandora and all the Na’vi made me want to be one of them. I can’t stop thinking about all the things that happened in the film and all of the tears and shivers I got from it. I even contemplate suicide thinking that if I do it I will be rebirthed in a world similar to Pandora.” Wow, that is seriously twisted. I can only hope this dude is kidding or has a good therapist on speed dial because after all—it’s only a freaking movie. My suggestion is to buy some blue body paint and rent “Planet Earth” so he can remember that this planet is pretty dope, too. [CNN] Keep reading »

Alexa Ray Joel, Evangelist For “Heartbreak-Related Depression”

When songstress Alexa Ray Joel landed in the hospital after trying to OD on a handful of homeopathic pain pills in her NYC apartment, our hearts went out to her. Joel, 24, was apparently distraught over her breakup with band mate Jimmy Riot, 38, and swallowed the pills in a “cry for attention.” And no matter how famous your parents are—in Alexa’s case, Billy Joel and Christie Brinkley—breakups always make you feel like s**t. The good news is Joel is finding positive ways to work through her issues: She’s writing songs and she told New York Daily News she is at work on a project to teach “young girls with something I feel I know a great deal about: heartbreak-related depression.” Wait—what? Don’t nearly all breakups cause “heartbreak-related depression,” especially if you’re on the being-dumped side of things? Keep reading »

Dear Wendy: Depressed Husband Is Emotionally Abusive

Let me first start off by saying that I love my husband more than anything else on earth. We have been together for 10 years (no kids yet) and we have a very strong connection and bond, but we have one major problem that is starting to weigh on our marriage. My husband is depressed. He has been as long as I have known him due to a very troubled and unhappy childhood. I have grown to look past it, but it is becoming worse than ever and I can no longer ignore it. The thing is, his depression has a very ugly side. He becomes emotionally abusive to me, often calling me names or making me feel worthless. Although I understand that he is projecting the feelings he has for himself onto me, it still hurts and I am having a very difficult time maintaining my own happiness. He has been out of work lately, which is only adding to his depression. He becomes very angst-ridden and restless and starts to feel like the walls are closing in. He says it has nothing to do with me and that I am the best thing in his life. When I told him that something has to give because I can no longer tolerate the way he treats me, he told me that this is who he is and if I don’t like it, I need to ask him to leave and he will. But I don’t want him to leave! I love this man with all I’ve got! There are moments of happiness, but they are usually few and far between and usually only come when we have some money to spend on things other than bills. He is not one to take anti-depressants (his mother became highly addicted to them) and we are financially unable to afford a therapist. How can I maintain my own happiness and help him at the same time? I must reiterate that I love him and I want nothing more than for us to make it through this. — Depressing Love

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