Tag Archives: depression

Columbia University Freshman, 18, Jumps To Her Death From 14th Floor

There is no way to discuss this in a manner that’s particularly comfortable or even couth, so I’ll start with the facts: Martha Corey-Ochoa, an 18-year-old Columbia University incoming freshman, was found dead on Monday at around 11 p.m. following a fall from her 14th-floor dormitory on Manhattan’s West 114th Street, where her parents had dropped her off and helped her move in earlier in the day. Valedictorian of her graduating class at Dobbs Ferry High School in New York, the violinist and writer had planned to double major in English and mathematics. Her death was pronounced a suicide. Keep reading »

12 Self-Help Books That Actually Work

Self help books get a bad rap sometimes, I think. They’re seen as the province of walking, talking “Cathy” cartoons and hippie-dippie-fruit-loop types. That couldn’t be less true:  there are many different types of self-help books for all kinds of problems. Some books are more spiritual while others are more practical, as in teaching you techniques of coping with depression and anxiety. Not only is a good self-help book cheaper than paying for therapy — even if it’s just a co-pay!— but you can circle sections, fold over pages, and come back to them whenever you read.

I scoured my own bookshelf and that of The Frisky staff to find the best self-help books we’ve ever read — ones that actually work!

This piece is part of The Frisky’s How To Deal Week, in which we’re tackling mental health issues.

How To Deal
Life is hard. Sometimes we all need help dealing. Read More »
Giving Up Control
Being a control freak almost ruined Winona's life. Read More »

Let’s Go Ahead And Add This To Our Lengthy List Of Things To Have Anxiety About

How To Deal With Anxiety
Worried? Anxious? Panicked? Here are 10 ways to deal. Read More »
Chocolate for Health
A bar a day keeps the doctor away! Read More »
Stop Worrying!
Common first date fears you don't really need to worry about. Read More »

Great news, my fellow hand-wringing, self-flagellating, twitchy-eyed neurotics: our anxiety about life, death, and everything in between is actually going to help kill us! Oh, the irony. Even negligible levels of psychological distress, significantly lower than amounts that would encourage a formal diagnosis of anxiety or depression, have now been officially linked to an early death. Not a particular syndrome, or anything — just your regular, run-of-the-mill early death, meaning that if you’re a worrier and you happen to sustain an injury or develop basically any illness, your risk of mortality far exceeds that of calmer, better-adjusted people suffering from the same conditions. And the best part? Tom Russ, a clinical research fellow at Scotland’s University of Edinburgh and the author of the study, has no idea if treating symptoms of anxiety and depression can reduce this risk. Read: worry on, worriers, you’re going to die anyway. [Gawker via ABC News]

4 Ways To Help Your Man Fight Depression

You’ve noticed that your partner seems sad, irritable, or overly critical. Maybe he has expressed hopelessness or guilt. You have noticed a loss of interest in his usual activities, concentration trouble, or changes in his sleep pattern. All these could be signs that your man is struggling with some form of depression.

Depression isn’t only hard for him; mood disturbances also have a big impact on your relationship. But how do you bring up the subject? Many men have difficulty talking about their feelings in the first place. The prospect of having a mental healthdisorder is difficult to hear for anyone. Even gentle suggestions that the problem may lie within himself will likely not be appreciated.

As the saying goes, “People don’t care what you know until they know that you care.” So what can you do to help? Let me start by explaining what not to do.

1. Don’t say “Look on the bright side.” People with depression may have a long list of what is wrong with the world. You as a non-depressed person may not agree and will want to convince your partner otherwise. Read more …

Bad-Boy Club Drug Could Be The Answer To Depression

Wow, I never thought I’d see the day: Special K is about to get a makeover! Remember the drug’s sleazy clubbing days in the ’90s? The highly-addictive drug, called ketamine, started off as a humble animal tranquilizer but worked its ways into the hottest night spots, sending users into an ecstasy that made time stand still — or, more accurately, into a “dissociative anesthesia” that could lead to a psychotic breakdown.

But here’s the latest twist in ketamine’s history: It could revolutionize the way depression is treated. I’m not talking your garden-variety blues. This is for real, serious, deep, clinical depression. How could something so toxic for club kids be so helpful for people who are ill? Read more...

Girl Talk: In Defense Of Being Lazy

Explaining Depression
What does it really feel like to suffer from depression? Read More »
Be More Productive!
Here are nine surefire ways to make 2012 your most productive year yet! Read More »
Find A Therapist
therapist photo
Seven tips for finding the right therapist. Read More »

What do you do when one of the things you used to like about yourself the most, looking back, becomes one of the things that you like about yourself the least?

From as young as I can remember, a rocket ship of ambition propelled me forward in all that I did. I didn’t — and still don’t — have a wide variety of interests, because writing was where I excelled. I threw everything into it. My parents, of course, fanned the flames of this. They loved having a daughter who made them proud.

And I loved getting some attention. My older brother Eliot*, his bipolar disorder and his drug and alcohol addictions, consumed most of my parents’ energy and nearly all of their attention. I wrote a poem when I was 13 or 14 that I can remember to this day because it still applies to my life sometimes. It was called “Measuring Cups” and it was about parents struggling to measure out love and attention equally amongst their children, but failing. When I was that young, the best way I could find attention, short of developing a heroin addiction myself, was to impress my parents with awards and articles and prizes and accolades. There was no confusion about this lifestyle, no hard choices to make. All I had to do was whatever made me look the best. Keep reading »

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