Tag Archives: depression

Girl Talk: And I Thought My Addictions Were Strange…

Thanks to the new TV show, “My Strange Addiction,” I have nothing to feel ashamed about. The TLC series, which offers rubbernecking shock value, made my own struggles with addiction seem more commonplace. Keep reading »

Dear Wendy: “My Fiancé Has Cold Feet”

I am in my mid-twenties, currently engaged to and living with a man I love and respect very much. We got engaged after only nine months, and in total, we’ve only been together for a little over a year. His proposal was a total shock; I was perfectly happy to just be together without rushing things, but I have to admit, it feels right to be going ahead with this. About a week ago, when I brought up marriage plans over dinner, my fiancé got visibly upset, and started talking about how “some couples just don’t ever get married” and how he thinks that’s a good way to go. He also started talking about changing the wedding plans to something much smaller than we had discussed. He later even talked about putting the wedding off indefinitely. He assured me that he’s very much in love with me, and it’s not the thought of marrying ME that’s putting him off, but the idea of losing his independence and stagnating after he gets married. I want to reassure him and talk it over, but part of me thinks he probably just needs to stew over it for awhile (I did the same thing, to a lesser degree). My question is, do I give him his space to just work it out? How much space? At what point does it make sense to call off the engagement? I feel silly being engaged with no wedding on the horizon. Regardless, I’m still committed; I just need to know where I/we stand so I can make life plans. Advice? — Bride in Question

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Teen Romance, Even Worse Than You Remember

Turns out you can blame more than just your crappy prom night on that d-bag who broke your heart back in high school! A University Of Maine study has confirmed that the quality of a woman’s early romances can be seen as an indicator for depression. If a girl is constantly looking for reassurance in the form of a boyfriend, she’s more likely to become depressed, especially if the guys she’s gotten involved with are jerks. The biggest red flags were nagging your boo to tell you they love you all the time, complaining about the same things over and over again, and the “totally deep,” er, excessive discussion of your personal problems. So, basically, anything you liked to do with your BF when you were a teenager was bad for you. Bummer. (Yeah, those cigarettes you sneaked count too, but they’re not part of this study.) Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I May Be Single, But I Am Not Alone

I’ve always been kind of a loner. While I’m silly and funny and irreverent with one or two people, I clam up in social settings and in groups. I think this is why I’m a good interviewer: I focus very intently and intensely on one person. More specifically, I need a lot of time in my own head to think. The two activities that I love the most — writing and reading — both require being alone. As with anything, I’m sure I came to be like this with some combination of nurture and nature. I am the youngest of five kids, so I learned as a child to be in the physical presence of other people but still do my own thing. But my parents were pretty preoccupied with stuff going on in my brother’s life from the time that I was 14 years old onward, so I also learned how to be independent. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I’m An Extreme Emotions Junkie

I came to a new understanding about myself recently. At my session last week, after hearing me go on and on about a recent bout of man-related depression, my therapist cut me off with a revelation. “You know what you are?” Dr. A said. “You’re an extreme emotions junkie. Some people are adrenaline junkies — they get off of some sort of thrill, like jumping out of a plane — but you get off on feeling really good or really bad. It’s what makes you feel the most vibrant, the most alive.” Keep reading »

Girl Talk: How A Happy Light Saved Me From SAD

After Daylight Saving Time ended in November, the old adage “spring ahead, fall behind” began to ring true. I not only fell behind in projects, socializing, and errands, all I wanted to do was fall asleep. Yoga after work? No energy. Dinner and drinks? No thanks; I’d rather go snooze on my couch. One afternoon, I was sitting at my desk at The Frisky office when I looked out the window and it was pitch black – at 5 p.m. Even though it was so early, I felt anxious, like it was time to go home; I could no longer be productive. The bitter cold outside only made me want to hibernate more. Keep reading »

Girls Who Start Menstruating Early Are More Likely To Suffer From Depression

I got my first period when I was 12 about to turn 13. I, of course, felt like I was the last one. My friends Annie and Sarah both got their periods before me and, I swear, it bonded them in a way that made me insanely jealous. I wanted blood to flow out of my vagina too! I wanted Kirk Cameron to respond to my fan mail and I wanted to be a woman, dammit. When it finally happened, it didn’t take long for me to realize that having your period is basically a complete bummer. And it’s especially a bummer for girls who get their first visit from Aunt Flow at a younger age. According to the U.K.’s Daily Mail, a survey of 2,000 girls found that those who got their first visit from Aunt Flo before the age of 13-and-a-half were more likely to suffer from depression than girls who got their periods later. This is likely because menstruation comes as part of the package deal known as PUBERTY and puberty sucks. And if you’re going through puberty before other kids your age, well, that’s even crappier. “Early maturing girls may feel isolated, and faced with demands which they are not emotionally prepared for,” said Bristol University research Dr. Carol Joinson. There isn’t a conclusive link, however, between girls who got their periods early and depression in adulthood, but I’m pretty sure I can blame my mental issues on my hippie mom making me wear pads instead of tampons. [Daily Mail UK] Keep reading »

Gwyneth Paltrow Opens Up About Postpartum Depression

“[After the birth of her son, Moses,] I felt like a zombie. I couldn’t access my heart. I couldn’t access my emotions. I couldn’t connect.It was terrible, it was the exact opposite of what had happened when Apple was born. With her, I was on cloud nine. I couldn’t believe it wasn’t the same. I just thought it meant I was a terrible mother and a terrible person. About four months into it, Chris [Martin of Coldplay, her husband] came to me and said, ‘Something’s wrong. Something’s wrong. ‘I kept saying, ‘No, no, I’m fine.’ But Chris identified it, and that sort of burst the bubble … I thought postpartum depression meant you were sobbing every single day and incapable of looking after a child. But there are different shades of it and depths of it, which is why I think it’s so important for women to talk about it. It was a trying time. I felt like a failure.”

Gwyneth Paltrow opened up to Good Housekeeping about her bout with postpartum depression five years ago. Much like my own experience with depression, Gwynnie wasn’t a sobbing mess every day; instead, it just felt like the color was leeched out of her life. She’s super lucky her partner was able to identify her pain and support her recovery. I, for one, respect that she’s willing to follow in other actresses’ footsteps and talk publicly about it. [CNN] Keep reading »

Kirsten Dunst Talks About Depression

“I think most people in their twenties go through some sort of depression. If you’re successful at a young age, no matter the profession, there has to come a time when you reevaluate everything, what it means to you. Is this what I want to do for the rest of my life?”

Kirsten Dunst talks to New York about why we haven’t seen her in a while. Kirsten says she did a stint in rehab to treat her depression, which confuses me. Don’t you go to a therapist or a psych ward for depression? No judgment on getting help for it—I’ve been clinically depressed before, so I understand. Just seems odd to me. Either way, I’m glad Kirsten is back. [NYMag.com]

See why her role in “All Good Things” appealed to her so much, after the jump: Keep reading »

20 Ways To Beat The Winter Blues

We are less than three weeks away from the shortest day of the year and if you’re anything like me, you’re starting to feel the effects of the winter blues — or Seasonal Affective Disorder — begin to set in. Sure, we have a little distraction with the holidays, but come January if we haven’t set up some routine to break us out of a winter rut, we may find ourselves in danger of barely hanging on until spring. A few weeks ago, you shared some of your ideas for combating the winter blues, and after the jump is a roundup of some of those suggestions plus a few of my own to get us motivated to tackle the long months ahead. Keep reading »

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