Tag Archives: depression

Daisy Coleman, Teen Rape Victim In Missouri, Hospitalized After Suicide Attempt

Girl, 14, Raped In Maryville
14-Year-Old Girl Is Raped And Left To Freeze On Her Front Porch, Town Rallies Behind Her Attacker
14-year-old Daisy Coleman from Maryville, MO, is raped. Read More »
Daisy On CNN
Daisy Coleman and her mother speak about Maryville rape on CNN. Read More »
2nd Maryville Victim Talks
paige parkhurst maryville rape victim
Paige Parkhurst, second Maryville victim, speaks. Read More »
daisy coleman maryville rape

Daisy Coleman, the Maryville, Missouri, teenager whose rape by a politically well-connected classmate attracted nationwide attention, tried to commit suicide this week.

Daisy was raped in 2012 at age 14 by some of her male classmates at a party she attended with a girl friend. Both girls were given alcohol by older boys and allegedly raped while drunk; one of the rapes was allegedly recorded with an iPhone camera and passed around school. The night, the boys dropped Daisy and her friend, Paige Parkhurst, off at Daisy’s home. While Paige made it inside, Daisy was left outside on the front lawn overnight in freezing temperatures while drunk. Her alleged rapist, high school football player Matthew Barnett, then 17, had all charges dismissed against him. Matthew is the grandson of a MO state representative. Keep reading »

Chiara De Blasio, Daughter Of NYC’s New Mayor, Describes Her Depression And Battle With Substance Abuse

“Getting sober is always a positive thing."

I would like to applaud Chiara de Blasio, the 19-year-old daughter of New York City’s new mayor Bill de Blasio, for her bravery in speaking frankly and honestly about her struggle with clinical depression and using marijuana and alcohol to cope. The Santa Clara University sophomore just completed an outpatient group therapy program for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse, and in the video above, released by the de Blasio campaign today, Chiara discusses her recovery. “Removing substances from my life has opened so many doors for me,” she says. “I was actually able to participate in my dad’s campaign … Now I’m doing well in school and actually getting to explore things that aren’t just partying.” Keep reading »

Remembering Ned Vizzini (1981 – 2013)

ned vizzini

On Friday morning I had just sat down at my desk at work when I got the message: my friend Ned committed suicide the day before.

What? No, not Ned. No. No. What? Why? Why now?

I don’t have anything original to say about grief, other than that incredulity, anger and sadness are on rapid spin cycle.

Yes. Yes, Ned. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Accepting The Holiday Mehs

Girl-Talk-Holiday-Mehs

I hate the term holiday blues. I think that’s because when I was 19, December rolled around and I fell into a full-blown depression, complete with sleepless nights, loss of appetite and thoughts of suicide. The holiday blues sound like an uptempo jazz standard compared to the nightmarish thoughts blaring in my head. I’m hardly the only college student who has teetered on the brink of a breakdown. It’s practically a cliche to experience some sort of mental and emotional suffering when you’re that age. But at the time, it didn’t feel like a cliche. It felt like the fight of my life, the recovery from which, with the help of therapy, was an epic journey up from an underworld I feared I might inhabit for the rest of my life. Months later, sitting in my therapist’s office, trying to solve a Rubick’s Cube that she kept on her desk, I clicked one row of orange squares together and felt a spark of hope. I woke up the next morning and thought, What’s for breakfast? I knew I was doing a lot better — at least enough to begin to function again.

I’ve never suffered another episode of depression, but ever since then, I’ve never experienced a happy holiday season either. I know that this is a particularly difficult time of year for many people. Especially those who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder or those who are grappling with more tangible hardships like financial struggles or a death in the family. I wish I could say I had a definitive reason to feel so meh in December. It’s much harder to pin down my discomfort around this time of year because it’s not related to my external circumstances — I have a wonderful family, great friends, a happy relationship and a job I love. I have much to be grateful and joyous about and I know it. The thing is, I consider myself a more-or-less happy person — at least for big pockets of time year-round. I understand how to access joy more often as I get older — positive thoughts, low expectations, balance. Even still, at this time of year, despite my best efforts, despite all my blessings, I  find myself  hanging on tight and crossing my fingers that I don’t spiral into darkness again.  Keep reading »

Study: Casual Sex Might Be Making Teenagers Sad

Study: Casual Sex Might Be Making Teenagers Sad

A new study from Ohio State University in the Journal of Sex Research suggests that casual teenage sex has a reciprocal relationship with poor mental health – and that they contribute to one another over time.

An important thing to note is that this link was found to be the same for both men and women. “That was unexpected because there is still this sexual double standard in society that says it is OK for men to have casual sexual relationships, but it is not OK for women,” said assistant professor of human sciences Claire Kamp Dush, Ph.D. In this sense, it seems that both genders have the same relationship to casual sex — if only pop culture would catch on to that! Keep reading »

The 5 Different Categories Of Boredom (As Determined By Scientists)

Not many kids dream of growing up and spending their days studying the nuances of the most apathetic feeling known to the human race, yet, Thomas Goetz, a professor of empirical educational research at the University of Konstanz in Germany, found the subject of boredom at least marginally interesting enough to delve deeper into it.

“Given the high frequency of boredom in various situations encountered in daily life and the variety of detrimental experiences to which boredom is related, it is rather surprising that to date there has been little research conducted on this specific emotion,” Goetz wrote in the study published this week in the Journal Motivation and Emotion.

He makes a good point I suppose. People feel bored a lot. So, Goetz and his colleagues recruited a group of high school students (who better?) and group college students for their boredom study. The results were staggering. Well, not really, but they discovered that there are five distinct categories of boredom. Find out which one you might be experiencing right this moment. Keep reading »

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