Tag Archives: depression

Girl Talk: I Can’t Stop Sleeping

Free Ways To Feel Better
12 free, easy ways to improve your mental health! Read More »
Mental Health Days
In praise of mental health days. Read More »
Sleep Talk
What's the weirdest conversation you've ever had in your sleep? Read More »

This story begins in a basement waiting room in Brooklyn. My boyfriend and I stare at our phones on a dirty looking love seat across from the reception desk. There’s no service, and cellphone games give me headaches, so I pick up an issue of Parenting magazine, even though I am not a parent and — thank god — this isn’t that kind of doctor’s visit. I’m not thirsty, but I drink a lot of water from the water cooler to occupy myself. It takes almost an hour before my name is called. The nurse is friendly, but she mumbles and I keep having to ask her to repeat herself. I am relieved when she asks me how much I weigh rather than making me step on the scale, but the anxiety rises again when she measures my blood pressure. The machine squeezes my arm and then releases it in slow puffs — panic, panic, panic.

Actually, this story begins on Christmas night. And the night before. And the night after. And all of the nights that I went to bed too early. This story begins with me apologizing. This story begins with my mother’s worried face. It begins with an unquenchable, inexplicable desire for sleep, which actually begins nine years ago when I was in 12th grade and became addicted to going to bed. Because that’s what this is really about. That’s the reason I am waiting in a cold doctor’s office, picking nervously at my nail polish, listening to the paper crinkle each time I move, and wanting very badly to pee.

I’m tired. I’m tired all the time. Keep reading »

Diet Soda Linked To Depression

Yet another reason diet soda may not be as good a choice as you assumed: A new study links it to an increased risk of depression, LiveScience reports. More than 263,900 US adults answered questions about their beverage consumption between 1995 and 1996, and about 10 years later, they were asked if they had been diagnosed with depression since the year 2000. Those who regularly consumed four or more cans per day of any type of soda were 30 percent more likely to have been diagnosed with depression, but those who chose diet soda saw a 31% increased risk compared to just 22% for regular-soda-drinkers. Read more…

Girl Talk: Why Do I Feel So Depressed Around The Holidays?

Stressed?
Here's how to avoid a holiday-fueled freak out. Read More »
Single For The Holidays?
How to survive. Read More »
Happy Holidays!
The Frisky is here for you for this holiday season. Need gift ideas? Moral support? Read More »
christmas pug

The irony about people who cope with depression is that some of us are actually quite happy people. We are not, contrary to stereotype, slogging through life with the weight of one thousand sorrows dragging behind us. I may feel things intensely, sure. But I’m not someone whose blue-colored glasses see everyone screwed up and the world a terrible place.

That is, until the holidays come around. Keep reading »

Science Says That Diets Are Actually Depressing, Not Just Hyperbolically

Fuck Food Shame
family holiday
How handle the food shaming that comes with the holidays. Read More »

Dieting is probably my foremost hobby. It might even take precedence over my two other main interests, which are 1) lying on the sofa complaining of feeling faint like a Victorian anemic and 2) staring at myself in the mirror. Of course, dieting for me just means eating healthily, because my idea of eating whatever I want includes sandwiches composed of whole baguettes with an entire pig’s worth of prosciutto, several slices of pepperoni pizza, and entire pints of ice cream in one sitting. The world in which I can eat as I please is a world in which raw kale does not exist. (Baked kale chips can stay.)

So it only makes sense that, however unpleasant it may be, I force myself to eat in a reasonable, controlled manner, which means cutting out some of my favorite foods altogether. Once I get them in front of me, I cannot resist, and then I’m eating all of it, because food is my drug. Which leads me to this: much like the gravitational pull of your favorite flavors can put you induce a drug-like euphoria, being forced (by a self-imposed or otherwise mandatory diet) to stop eating high-fat and high-sugar foods can cause withdrawal symptoms and depression. It’s science! Keep reading »

Girl Talk: Going To A Nude Beach Made Me Feel A Little Better About Life

Reasons To Be Naked
You should be naked more often. Read More »
Free Mood Boosters
Free ways to improve your mental health. Read More »
First Time Nude
The first time this writer posed nude. Read More »

I am not a beach person. The way seagulls swoop over your head like rats with wings terrifies me. I hate that feeling of sand caked in every crevice.

But when my friend Thomas invited my husband and I to a nude federal beach in New Jersey, rumored to be filled with spectacularly hung men and tanned, pierced women, I decided it was something worth trying.

“I think we should go,” I told my husband.

He shrugged.

Maybe it was because I needed a change. Spring had been of those staying-in-bed-smoking-cigarettes instead of going out seasons. I found myself fighting a constant drowsiness and listening to Jewel. Some days it took an effort to look both ways before crossing the street. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: It Got Better

I Have Depression
Jessica has struggled with depression all her adult life. Read More »
Mental Health Days
In praise of mental health days. Read More »
Explaining Depression
What does it really feel like to suffer from depression? Read More »

I used to be the sort of person who was always looking for the next big thing. In high school, I wanted to be in college. In college, I wanted to have a job. Every job I had, I wanted to be more successful.

I didn’t learn about stillness, about just being, until I had to. And I don’t think it’s coincidental that the more I just be and the more gratitude I have for my life, the happier I am.

My bouts of depression have always had a chicken-and-the-egg quality to them. Was I on a downward spiral of depression throughout my mid-20s? Or was it from my stressful and demanding job and how hard I was on myself about not being the most amazing person ever? Did I feel depressed because I studied abroad in Eastern Europe away from my family and my friends? Or was I depressed already and that trip just exacerbated it?

I don’t think there are necessarily answers other than “both.” Just the way my mom is inclined to bruise easily if she knocks her leg on a coffee table, I’m inclined to get depressed easily. I wouldn’t have chosen to be this way if I had the choice. But since this is what the lottery stuck me with, I’ve learned how to cope with it. Keep reading »

Columbia University Freshman, 18, Jumps To Her Death From 14th Floor

There is no way to discuss this in a manner that’s particularly comfortable or even couth, so I’ll start with the facts: Martha Corey-Ochoa, an 18-year-old Columbia University incoming freshman, was found dead on Monday at around 11 p.m. following a fall from her 14th-floor dormitory on Manhattan’s West 114th Street, where her parents had dropped her off and helped her move in earlier in the day. Valedictorian of her graduating class at Dobbs Ferry High School in New York, the violinist and writer had planned to double major in English and mathematics. Her death was pronounced a suicide. Keep reading »

12 Self-Help Books That Actually Work

Self help books get a bad rap sometimes, I think. They’re seen as the province of walking, talking “Cathy” cartoons and hippie-dippie-fruit-loop types. That couldn’t be less true:  there are many different types of self-help books for all kinds of problems. Some books are more spiritual while others are more practical, as in teaching you techniques of coping with depression and anxiety. Not only is a good self-help book cheaper than paying for therapy — even if it’s just a co-pay!— but you can circle sections, fold over pages, and come back to them whenever you read.

I scoured my own bookshelf and that of The Frisky staff to find the best self-help books we’ve ever read — ones that actually work!

This piece is part of The Frisky’s How To Deal Week, in which we’re tackling mental health issues.

How To Deal
Life is hard. Sometimes we all need help dealing. Read More »
Giving Up Control
Being a control freak almost ruined Winona's life. Read More »

Let’s Go Ahead And Add This To Our Lengthy List Of Things To Have Anxiety About

How To Deal With Anxiety
Worried? Anxious? Panicked? Here are 10 ways to deal. Read More »
Chocolate for Health
A bar a day keeps the doctor away! Read More »
Stop Worrying!
Common first date fears you don't really need to worry about. Read More »

Great news, my fellow hand-wringing, self-flagellating, twitchy-eyed neurotics: our anxiety about life, death, and everything in between is actually going to help kill us! Oh, the irony. Even negligible levels of psychological distress, significantly lower than amounts that would encourage a formal diagnosis of anxiety or depression, have now been officially linked to an early death. Not a particular syndrome, or anything — just your regular, run-of-the-mill early death, meaning that if you’re a worrier and you happen to sustain an injury or develop basically any illness, your risk of mortality far exceeds that of calmer, better-adjusted people suffering from the same conditions. And the best part? Tom Russ, a clinical research fellow at Scotland’s University of Edinburgh and the author of the study, has no idea if treating symptoms of anxiety and depression can reduce this risk. Read: worry on, worriers, you’re going to die anyway. [Gawker via ABC News]

4 Ways To Help Your Man Fight Depression

You’ve noticed that your partner seems sad, irritable, or overly critical. Maybe he has expressed hopelessness or guilt. You have noticed a loss of interest in his usual activities, concentration trouble, or changes in his sleep pattern. All these could be signs that your man is struggling with some form of depression.

Depression isn’t only hard for him; mood disturbances also have a big impact on your relationship. But how do you bring up the subject? Many men have difficulty talking about their feelings in the first place. The prospect of having a mental healthdisorder is difficult to hear for anyone. Even gentle suggestions that the problem may lie within himself will likely not be appreciated.

As the saying goes, “People don’t care what you know until they know that you care.” So what can you do to help? Let me start by explaining what not to do.

1. Don’t say “Look on the bright side.” People with depression may have a long list of what is wrong with the world. You as a non-depressed person may not agree and will want to convince your partner otherwise. Read more …

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