Tag Archives: counterfeits

When A Label Knockoff Is Much More Than A Rip-Off

Most tourists that visit New York know that if you want a Coach bag, but don’t want to pay Coach prices, you can head down to Chinatown and buy a Coach knockoff for a fraction of the designer price. The counterfeit business is a multimillion dollar illegal industry, and you’d be surprised how many fashionistas are carrying fake Fendis. So, that’s one kind of counterfeiting; but there’s a whole other style of knockoffs — homemade knockoffs.

Not long ago, artist Luis Gispert became obsessed with logo counterfeiters — people who ripped off designer logos and made custom designs with them for their clothing, cars and in some extreme cases, houses. Gispert’s new solo show at New York’s Mary Boone Gallery, titled “Decepcion,” chronicles those logo obsessives, who see their work as more of an homage to the aspirational lifestyle of luxury brands than a desire to pass off their wares as genuine. Keep reading »

Are These Jeans Real True Religion Or Fake?

Find out after the jump.
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Tourist Fined €1000 For Buying €7 Counterfeit Louis Vuitton Bag

In an apparent effort to be as ridiculous as possible, Italian mayor Francesco Calzavara has instituted insane fines for people caught purchasing counterfeit goods. Ursula Corel, a 65-year-old tourist visiting from Vienna, learned this the hard way last week when she was fined €1000 while haggling for a €7 Louis Vuitton replica on the beach near Venice. We’re not fans of counterfeiting — it’s tacky and ethically questionable — but this still strikes us as a punishment totally not in keeping with the crime. True, without buyers, the €7 billion counterfeiting industry would be crippled, but putting that large a burden on the buyers seems more like a desperate attempt on the part of the state to bring in revenue than a legitimate punishment for buying a fake Louis. Thoughts? [The Guardian] Keep reading »

Should Fashion Knockoffs Be Illegal?

Over the weekend, a fashion industry caucus called the “Congressional Apparel Manufacturing and Fashion Business Caucus” was approved in Washington, DC. Boring though the name may be, the things they’d like to get done are actually pretty cool. Aside from the expected aim of curtailing design copying and counterfeiting, the caucus will also focus on getting funding for a design incubator program, scholarships for fashion students and saving New York’s Garment District. Third-term CFDA President Diane von Furstenberg has expressed interest in creating actual laws against design stealing, and this caucus could be a legit step towards that. Or it could prove to be yet another useless bit of Washington red tape. Do you think the relentless copycatting should be regulated? [Fashionologie] Keep reading »

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