Tag Archives: campaign for real beauty

3 Problems I Have With Dove’s “Campaign For Real Beauty”

Today, after 10+ years of relentless ads, Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” was named #1 in the Advertising Age list of top ad campaigns of the 21st century for its mission to, according to the magazine, “change societal notions about beauty.” Sorry, but I find that totally lame. I’m also really sick of hearing about this campaign. Of all the ad campaigns in the world, this one is the best? I think the campaign was thought up with positive intentions, and it definitely launched an important cultural conversation about societal norms – but changing norms? I’m not so sold on that one. Dove’s campaign does nothing to challenge the popular notion that beauty should be the most important thing in a woman’s life. It doesn’t aim to stop us from obsessing over looks, it just reframes the conversation about image to a supposedly more positive one. I hesitate to cut down any campaign that gets people thinking about what a monster the media body image machine is, and Dove has surely done some real good by encouraging self-acceptance. That said, it’s important to consider the problematic messages in Dove’s campaign and acknowledge it as a solid first step on a path to more ethical advertising rather than the authority on the subject.

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Wonderbra Plans The Largest Lingerie Shoot Ever

Wonderbra is trying to organize the world’s biggest underwear shoot ever, and let me tell you, there is a lot of competition in this category. They’re looking for 1,000 women in London to photograph in their new line of bras. We smell a bigger version of Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty. At least with so many models, the people will be so small that airbrushing won’t really be a factor. [MarieClaire.co.uk]

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Dove’s Side Of The Airbrushing Story

Dove finally issued a statement about the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty ads and whether they were airbrushed. They say that there wasn’t any major retouching on the photos, only removal of dust and minor color correction. Pascal Dangin, the retoucher, confirms this: “The recent article published by The New Yorker incorrectly implies that I retouched the images in connection with the Dove “real women” ad. I only worked on the Dove ProAge campaign taken by Annie Leibovitz and was directed only to remove dust and do color correction — both the integrity of the photographs and the women’s natural beauty were maintained.” Who can you believe? [JolieNadine.com via Jezebel]

Previously: Even “Real” Women Are Digitally Enhanced Keep reading »

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